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Jefferson County Courthouse - Pine Bluff, Arkansas

PINE BLUFF, Ark. (AP) — A former Arkansas lawmaker who became Jefferson County's chief administrative officer after leaving the Legislature will resign after a federal prosecutor revealed he had received $100,000 in bribes while serving in state government, according to a newspaper report.


LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Arkansas officials and a medical supply company want to toss out a lawsuit over the firm's claims the state misleadingly obtained an execution drug now that the prison system's supply of the drug has expired.


ST. LOUIS (AP) — A Missouri death row inmate whose life was spared by a last-minute stay of execution four years ago is asking the U.S. Supreme Court for another reprieve, claiming the process of killing him could cause blood-filled tumors to burst inside his head.


LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) - A federally funded study focusing on two Arkansas cities will serve as an outline for statewide efforts to reduce pedestrian deaths.


LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — An Arkansas judge said Friday he'll rule by the middle of next week on whether to allow the state to issue its first licenses for companies to grow medical marijuana after hearing complaints from an unsuccessful applicant challenging the permitting process.

The Arkansas Public Service Commission is expected to close a docket soon that could substantially lower a cash incentive for Arkansans (and Arkansas companies) who invest in solar and wind energy production.

The commission is the representative authority over investor-owned utilities, sanctioned monopolies. The commission can affect utility rates — that is, bills. The docket’s been open for three years.

At issue is something called “net metering,” the act of sending electricity (generated by solar power system or windmill) out onto the grid from home or business and getting bill credits from the electrical utility. Created by Act 1781 of 2001, Arkansas’s net metering rate structure currently is 1-to-1. 

(Left to Right):  Rex Nelson, Arkansas Democrat-Gazette; Wes Brown, Talk Business & Politics; and Roby Brock, Talk Business & Politics
Talk Business and Politics

Everyone needed spring break this week to recover from last week’s end of the fiscal session and three-day special session of the Arkansas Legislature.  Two gentlemen who did not take the week off are Talk Business’ Wes Brown and Arkansas Democrat-Gazette’s Rex Nelson.  Talk Business’ Roby Brock sits down with Brown and Nelson to talk about the sessions, medical marijuana, and Governor Hutchinson’s big “smaller” idea.

File photo of the premiere of the "Mamma mia" play at the Terazije Theatre
Dalibor Tonkovic / Wikipedia

Arkansas Department of Parks and Tourism Travel Writer Kim Williams talks about the following events happening in Arkansas during the weekend of March 23!

The Justice Complex, Jonesboro. Taken by KASU Photojournalim-Graphics Designer Intern Cynthia Barnhill
Cynthia Barnhill / KASU Photojournalim-Graphics Designer Intern

The Craighead County District Court is again offering amnesty for some minor offenses, which comes amid a lawsuit filed by a company who has managed the county's probation program for over 20 years.

Arkansas Public Media reported that the Justice Network filed a lawsuit against the county and district Judges David Bowling and Tommy Fowler.  The Memphis-based company claimed that they lost revenue because of the program.

Arkansas State Capitol

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Arkansas lawmakers wrapped up a three-day special session Thursday by completing work on legislation pertaining to pharmacy reimbursement rates, highway funding and college savings plans, just as Gov. Asa Hutchinson was saying he hopes such special sessions don't become routine.

Jerry Adams, CEO of the Arkansas Research Alliance, speaking with Roby Brock of Talk Business and Politics
Talk Business and Politics

The Arkansas Research Alliance is a non-profit that ties together the states 5 research institutions:  Arkansas State University, University of Arkansas School for Medical Sciences, University of Arkansas-Pine Bluff, University of Arkansas-Little Rock, and University of Arkansas-Fayetteville.  Roby Brock with Talk Business and Politics speaks with Jerry Adams, CEO of the Alliance.  Adams has spearheaded the organization for 10 years.  They discuss the impact the alliance has on the state’s economy, their mission, and their future plans.

Breaking Grass from left to right, Tyler White, Zach Wooten, Cody Farrar, Britt Sheffield, Jody Elmore

The band Breaking Grass will perform a concert of bluegrass music on Monday, March 26, at 7:00 p.m. at the Collins Theatre, 120 West Emerson Street, in downtown Paragould, Arkansas.  The concert is part of the Bluegrass Monday concert series presented by KASU 91.9 FM.  KASU will literally “pass the hat” to collect money to pay the group.  The suggested donation is $5 per person.

Pulaski County Circuit Judge Wendell Griffen
KUAR Public Radio

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — An Arkansas judge on Wednesday temporarily blocked the state from awarding its first licenses for companies to grow medical marijuana in response to complaints about the state's process for reviewing applications for the facilities.


  LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — The U.S. Department of Agriculture has designated 61 drought-stricken Arkansas counties as disaster areas, making farmers and ranchers in the counties eligible for natural disaster assistance.

A bill is up for vote by the general assembly  that would protect hog farmers from lawsuits for certain environmental issues once their waste permits are approved.

The legislation was approved by the Arkansas General Assembly today, and it's meant to reassure hog farmers as well as the banks who lend them money.