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Jonesboro City Council looks over 2018 proposed budget

Jonesboro Mayor Harold Perrin says the key to Jonesboro’s success in the future lies in how it can attract more people to not only come to the city, but decide to stay. Perrin says some of next year’s budget has specific items that will address quality of life issues, such as this example from the city’s Parks and Recreation budget. “We had four tournaments that were rained out this year and that means that $70,000 in sales tax revenue has been lost because we couldn’t hold those tournaments,...

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Music & Arts Connection

(From left) No Time Flatt — Becky Weaver, Patrick Cupples, Kevin Wright, Kevin Keen and Steve Moore.
Arkansas State University

KASU Bluegrass Monday: No Time Flatt

JONESBORO – The band No Time Flatt will perform a concert of bluegrass music Monday, Nov. 27, at 7 p.m. at the Collins Theatre, 120 West Emerson Street, in downtown Paragould. The concert is part of the Bluegrass Monday concert series presented by KASU 91.9 FM, the 100,000-watt public broadcasting service of Arkansas State University. Formed in 2015, No Time Flatt has quickly assembled a large group of devoted fans known as “Flattheads.” Based in West Tennessee, this band released its first...

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NPR Connection

'Butcher Of Bosnia' Ratko Mladic Guilty Of Genocide, Crimes Against Humanity

Updated at 8 a.m. ET After a 5 1/2-year trial, the former Bosnian Serb military commander blamed for orchestrating the murders of thousands of ethnic Muslims has learned his own fate. On Wednesday morning, judges at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia in The Hague handed down a guilty verdict for one count of genocide, five counts of crimes against humanity and four counts of violations of the laws or customs of war, out of the 11 counts against 74-year-old Ratko...

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Updated at 6:38 p.m. ET

For a span of some four months earlier this year, demonstrators swarmed Venezuela's city streets in protest of ballooning inflation, diminishing food and President Nicolas Maduro's tightening grasp on power — until, that is, Maduro's efforts to derail the opposition bore fruit. By August the protests ebbed from view, as a new lawmaking body packed with Maduro's preferred politicians took the country's reins.

Still, while the protests have all but disappeared, the economic woes that helped inspire them remain as obstinate as ever.

The Trump Organization is severing ties with the controversial Trump SoHo building in New York City.

The development, which is a hybrid hotel-condominium building where owners of units can only live in their properties for a certain amount of time each year, has the potential to be a thorn in the side of President Trump — linking him to murky financing arrangements, allegations of fraud and a Russian-born developer with a criminal past.

The closed-circuit television footage is silent, but that makes it no less dramatic.

A jeep speeds through the North Korean countryside, crossing what is known as the 72-Hour Bridge.

Inside the vehicle is a North Korean soldier, making a desperate escape. All but the headlights disappear behind tree cover.

I have covered many wars during my years at NPR, but never did I encounter such a monstrous man as Ratko Mladic, the Bosnian Serb army commander likely to spend the rest of his life in prison.

I first heard his name when I was staying in Sarajevo in June 1992. It was a time of constant and brutal shelling carried out on the explicit orders of Mladic, who was intent on terrorizing and dividing the city and killing or expelling all non-Serbs.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

While the word "audit" all by itself doesn't sound very fun, for the Colorado Secretary of State it's absolutely celebratory. Following the 2017 off-year election, the state is performing a first-in-the-nation risk-limiting audit of the statewide results.

"We're here to celebrate the fact that we've finally reached this milestone in our nation," Secretary of State Wayne Williams said.

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KASU Listeners' Trending Stories

New Arkansas Industrial Wood Pellet Mill Raises Green Stakes

More than 150 wood pellet manufacturing mills operate across the U.S., many supplying the domestic woodstove pellet market with home heating fuel. More than a quarter are industrial pellet mills, grinding thousands of acres of forest into biomass for overseas export to electrical utilities stoking retrofitted coal-fire furnaces with "densified" wood. The largest mills, concentrated in the southeastern U.S., claim to sustainably harvest timber, from both hardwood and softwood forests. But a new mill, Highland Pellets in Pine Bluff, which harvests only fast-growing Southern softwood pine may be among the greenest. Still, the calculated ecological costs and benefits of forest biomass remain hazy.

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Arkansas Business and Politics

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