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Social Issues

updated 11:44 am - LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — A Roman Catholic bishop who has led prayers at Arkansas anti-abortion rallies says he will not take part this year because its featured speaker is a public official who actively pushed for the state's aggressive execution schedule last year.

Bishop Anthony Taylor wrote an open letter to the state's 125,000 Catholics inviting them to special Masses instead of attending the event featuring Attorney General Leslie Rutledge.

An Arkansan has a newly minted role near the top of Congress’s budget-making hierarchy. U.S. Representative Steve Womack out of northwest Arkansas’s 3rd District is the new chair of the House Budget Committee. Congressman Womack talked with KUAR’s Jacob Kauffman as Friday’s government shutdown looms. Womack also addresses his initial support of the President’s immigration comments about Africa and Haiti.

Take a listen in the link above.

Participants of the 2017 Craighead County Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day parade walking across the Jonesboro Main St. bridge.
Johnathan Reaves, KASU News

2018 will be an important year for the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.  April 2018 will mark the 50th Anniversary of King’s assassination in Memphis, TN.

Communities across the nation have been remembering King’s legacy in January since 1986, and Craighead County has been no exception.  I sat down with one of the organizers of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Day parade for Craighead County, Dr. Lonnie Williams.  He is also the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs at Arkansas State University.  We talked about the parade, Dr. King’s legacy, and where he was when he heard the tragic news of King's assassination.  You can listen to the conversation below.


Arkansas State University Museum

A new exhibit at Arkansas State University’s Museum takes a look at racial identity and stereotypes in thrift store donations.  The exhibit is called “Sorting out Race”.  It will be held Monday through March 10th.  Director of the A-S-U Museum Dr. Marti Allen.

“This is on loan to us through the Kauffman Museum at Bethel College in North Newton, Kansas,” says Allen.  “This is the first time that this exhibit has been loaned to an institution east of Kansas so we are pleased to have this exhibit at Arkansas State.”

ST. LOUIS (AP) - A lawsuit alleging that Missouri's new voter identification law was intended to make it harder for poor and minority residents to cast their ballots has been dismissed.

Cole County Circuit Judge Jon Beetem on Tuesday dismissed the suit filed in June by the ACLU and the Advancement Project on behalf of the Missouri NAACP and the League of Women Voters.

Missouri voters overwhelmingly approved a November 2016 ballot measure instituting voter ID. The law became effective June 1.

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. (AP) — Roy Reed, who covered key events during the civil rights movement for The New York Times before returning to his native Arkansas to write and teach, has died. He was 87.

Reed died Sunday night at Washington Regional Medical Center in Fayetteville, according to his wife, Norma Reed. He had a severe stroke on Saturday at his home in the nearby unincorporated community of Hogeye.

After stints at the Joplin Globe in Missouri and the Arkansas Gazette, Reed reported on the civil rights movement during the 1960s for The Times.

Pixabay

updated  on 12/8/17 at 10:26 am

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) - The Latest on a judge ordering Arkansas to stop issuing birth certificates (all times local):

10:20 a.m.

Arkansas officials say they won't issue or amend birth certificates in response to a judge's order halting the program until the state complies with a U.S. Supreme Court ruling to amend a state birth certificate law it says illegally favors heterosexual parents.

Race violence expert Guy Lancaster, who serves as editor of the Encyclopedia of Arkansas History and Culture, has edited a new a collection of essays titled, “Bullets and Fire: Lynching and Authority in Arkansas 1840 to 1950." The book is published by the University of Arkansas Press.

Pixabay

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) - More than a dozen Arkansas residents are headed to Washington, D.C., to join thousands from across the country at a rally in support of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals.

The Arkansas Democrat-Gazette reports that the group of residents left Little Rock on Tuesday. Officials with the organizing groups United We Dream and the Fair Immigration Reform Movement say they expect up to 17,000 people to attend Wednesday's rally.

McCrory, AR water tower
Wikipedia

MCCRORY, Ark. (AP) - A city in east-central Arkansas has settled a federal lawsuit brought by a national civil rights organization over an attempt to ban mobile homes worth less than $7,500.

Talk Business and Politics

Roby Brock with Talk Business and Politics on this episode talks about sexual misconduct in the national headlines and how the national discussion impacts Arkansans.  Brock is speaking with Weekend Anchor Janelle Lilley of KATV in Little Rock and Tamika Edwards of Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families.


This is the 6:04 KASU newscast for Tuesday, September 26th.  

Here are the stories reported this morning:

Seven months after the Arkansas Supreme Court ruled Fayetteville's LGBT-inclusive civil rights ordinance did not comport with state law, a lower court must now decide if that law is even constitutional.

In Washington County Circuit Court before Judge Doug Martin, lawyers on both sides argued over discovery motions and the right to stay administration of Fayetteville's civil rights ordinance and enforcement commission. In place for two years, the ordinance was established explicitly to protect LGBT residents and visitors from discrimination -- because state law does not. 

This is the 6:04 KASU newscast for Monday, September 25th.  

Here are the stories reported this morning:

Elizabeth Eckford only had one concern before her first day of school. She wanted to make sure her white dress was finished so she could wear it. The next morning she was wearing the dress as her father paced back and forth in the hallway. She took a city bus to Little Rock Central High School. It was Sept. 4, 1957.

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