KASU

health

Soy has been widely accepted as a heart-healthy food for nearly two decades.  Manufacturers of packaged food products have claimed that soy protein reduces the risk of coronary heart disease, and labeled their products thusly.

Now, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration isn’t so sure and is seeking an unprecedented revocation of the authorized claim.  With an authorized claim, manufacturers get a stamp of approval from the FDA to directly state a health benefit — calcium, for instant, helps stymie osteoporosis.

The agency said a review of evidence linking soy protein to improved heart health wasn’t conclusive enough to warrant an authorized claim. 

Douglas Balentine, director of the Office of Nutrition and Food Labeling, said studies have evolved since the authorized claim for soy's heart benefits was approved in 1999.

ST. LOUIS (AP) - The husband of Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill of Missouri is in a hospital intensive care unit.

McCaskill said Monday on Twitter that Joseph Shepard "has a very big heart but right now not working very well. Currently in ICU. Thanks for your prayers in advance."

McCaskill spokeswoman Sarah Feldman says Shepard is hospitalized in St. Louis, but she said she had no further details about his condition.

Beth Smith, Director of the Northeast Arkansas Race for the Cure 2018, standing with artist Sarah Howell.  Howell made a painting commemorating the 2017 NEA Race for the Cure.  The painting is on display at the ASU-Jonesboro Cooper Alumni Center.
KASU

Watch live as officials for the Northeast Arkansas "Race for the Cure" make a special announcement for the next event in 2018.

This is the 6:04 KASU newscast for Wednesday, October 4th.  

This is the 6:04 KASU newscast for Thursday, September 28th.  

This is the 6:04 KASU newscast for Monday, September 25th.  

Here are the stories reported this morning:

Potential operators of medical marijuana cultivation facilities and dispensaries came together at a half-day symposium in Little Rock Wednesday to discuss their expectations of what the new industry will be like.

Among the attendees was TV host Montel Williams, who gave the keynote address at the event organized by the Arkansas Medical Marijuana Association. Williams has multiple sclerosis, and has long advocated for medicinal cannabis use. His visit had added significance, since he recently accepted a position on the association’s board.

This is the 6:04 KASU newscast for Thursday, September 21th.  

This is the 6:04 KASU newscast for Wednesday, September 20th.  

Vietnam veteran James Kaelin stands on a dirt road staring into an empty scrub forest once part of Fort Chaffee, a U.S. Army Training camp east of Fort Smith, Arkansas. 

“They won’t even admit to this being a test site to anybody,” Kaelin says. “But I have information showing the Army tested Agent Orange, Agent White and Agent Blue on seven different locations on Fort Chaffee in 1966 and 1967 without knowledge to the general public. It was top secret.”

Would-be growers and distributors of Arkansas' initial medical marijuana crop have flooded a state office building waiting for their turn to submit applications.

Ahead of Monday afternoon's deadline, there was about a three-hour wait for applicants at the Department of Finance and Administration Building. Agency spokesman Scott Hardin said that before noon, the office had distributed paperwork to more than 100 groups or individuals. Fewer than half the applicants had been called in for clerks to review paperwork to ensure it was in order.

ST. JOSEPH, Mo. (AP) — The Missouri State Highway Patrol troopers will all be carrying an opioid overdose reversal medication once they complete training.

The News-Press reports troopers, park rangers and conservation agents gathered at the patrol's headquarters on last month for training on how to use Naloxone, also known as Narcan.

This is the 6:04 KASU newscast for Tuesday, September 19th.  Here are the stories reported this morning:

This is the 6:04 KASU newscast for Monday, September 18th.  Here are the stories reported this morning:

NPR

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — A government agency survey says the percentage of Arkansas residents with health care insurance is on the rise, putting the state above the national average.

The number of uninsured residents dropped last year by almost 46,000 to nearly 231,800, according to the survey conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau.

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