Morning Edition

Weekdays 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m.
Steve Inskeep & Renee Montagne
Steve Inskeep

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Renée Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. Morning Edition, it's a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

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Strange News
6:20 am
Thu October 27, 2011

Long-Lost Pets Resurface

"Jack the Cat" became an Internet sensation when he disappeared in baggage claim at New York's Kennedy airport. Two months later, American Airlines says, Jack has resurfaced at customs. A Jack Russell terrier named Petey traveled a bit farther: from Tennessee to Detroit — nearly 600 miles.

Strange News
6:12 am
Thu October 27, 2011

For One Arizona Bride, Something Blew

A wedding video shows a couple pouring two bottles of sand into one to represent their union. Then a lot more sand arrives as a full-fledged Arizona sandstorm blasts through, turning the scene dusty red.

NPR News Investigations
4:00 am
Thu October 27, 2011

Native Survivors Of Foster Care Return Home

When Dwayne Stenstrom was 8 years old a state worker told him that he and his brother were going to a special camp for the summer. Instead, he spent 12 years in foster care.

John Poole NPR

Originally published on Thu November 15, 2012 5:02 pm

Part 3 of a three-part investigation

Dwayne Stenstrom is a professor of American history. His office is lined with towers of obscure books and poetry on the walls. There's even a copy of the Declaration of Independence in a binder.

He teaches this document like many other professors, beginning with, "We hold these truths to be self evident." But he stops on another phrase — "the inhabitants of our frontiers, the merciless Indian savages."

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NPR Story
3:00 am
Thu October 27, 2011

Occupy Oakland Protester Hurt, Police Criticized

Originally published on Tue November 1, 2011 7:25 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Protestors in Oakland, California gathered again in front of City Hall. Oakland's Occupy Wall Street last night was much more peaceful than the night before, when police used tear gas and non-lethal bullets to disperse the crowd. The confrontation left one protester hospitalized and it left allegations of excessive police force under investigation. NPR's Carrie Kahn reports.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERING AND APPLAUSE)

CARRIE KAHN, BYLINE: Protesters by the hundreds streamed into Oakland's downtown city hall plaza.

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Strange News
6:19 am
Wed October 26, 2011

Man Who Lost Ageism Suit Says Judge Was Too Old

Manhattan violinist Martin Stoner, 60, sued the nonprofit Young Concert Artists after it barred him from a contest based on age restrictions. When his ageism suit was thrown out, reports the New York Daily News, Stoner moved to have the 88-year-old judge replaced, saying the judge isn't qualified — because he's too old.

Strange News
6:15 am
Wed October 26, 2011

Actress Sues Amazon For Posting Her Age Online

An unnamed actress is suing Amazon for more than a million dollars for revealing her age on the Amazon-owned Internet Movie Database, or IMDB. The lawsuit says the actress is many years older than she looks, and that being "perceived to be over the hill" will hurt her career.

NPR Story
3:00 am
Wed October 26, 2011

Hurdles Facing EU Leaders At Brussels Debt Summit

Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, host: This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Ari Shapiro.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host: And I'm Renee Montagne.

The European Union is facing the worst crisis in its history and it has to the potential to affect us all. The meltdown in Greece could eventually imperil the entire global financial system. Today in Brussels, Europe's leaders will make another attempt at finalizing a eurozone survival plan. But time is short and the stakes could not be higher. The key players have big national issues to worry about.

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Business
3:00 am
Wed October 26, 2011

Business News

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, host: NPR's business news starts with the government's insider trading probe.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MONTAGNE: Federal prosecutors are set to file criminal charges today against a prominent business executive. Rajat Gupta was head of the consulting firm MacKenzie and a board member of Goldman Sachs.

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NPR Story
3:00 am
Wed October 26, 2011

Most Reliable Cars: Toyota At Top; Jaguar At Bottom

Originally published on Wed October 26, 2011 6:49 am

Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Consumer Reports has come out with its ranking of car reliability. Toyota's Scion brand topped the list. Luxury carmaker Jaguar was at the bottom. Chrysler was rated most improved. NPR's Sonari Glinton has more.

SONARI GLINTON, BYLINE: Okay, here's the Consumer Reports top 10 list: Scion, Lexus, Acura, Mazda, Honda, Toyota, Infiniti, Subaru, Nissan and Volvo. Not one American car brand.

DAVID CHAMPION: I think the fortunes have changed for the Big Three, in some ways.

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Strange News
5:42 am
Tue October 25, 2011

Savory Cotton Candy Wins Caesar Salad Award

Originally published on Tue October 25, 2011 5:50 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne with news of an unusual winning entry in Houston's annual Caesar salad competition. Best Presentation went to a Caesar salad cotton candy. As the Houston Press reports, the cotton candy was spun onto a cone made of romaine lettuce. Shredded parmesan cheese and black pepper were woven into the candy's pink fibers. It's not the most surprising entry. Last year's event included Caesar salad cupcakes and Caesar sorbet. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Strange News
5:35 am
Tue October 25, 2011

How To Get Rid Of Invasive Snakehead? Eat It

Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, host: Good morning. I'm Ari Shapiro.

Here's one way to get rid of an invasive species - eat it. The snakehead fish arrived in Washington almost a decade ago. It's a scary looking marine predator that can even slither over land. In Asia, snakeheads are a delicacy, so tonight in Maryland a group of celebrity chefs will prepare the fish to appeal to American palates. One chef deep fries snakehead nuggets for a dish he calls frankenfish tacos. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

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