Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a writer and producer who currently works on The Two Way, NPR's flagship news portal. In the past, he has edited and coordinated digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as All Tech Considered and The Salt.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to being the lead writer and editor on the London 2012 Olympics blog, The Torch. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR.org.

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, the site won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between legacy and digital departments.

Prior to joining NPR in late 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage out of Qatar during the Iraq war.

Chappell's work for CNN also included producing Web stories and editing digital video for SI.com, and editing and producing stories for CNN.com's features division.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

Actor Dean Jones, who starred in The Love Bug, That Darn Cat! and other classic Walt Disney movies, has died at age 84. In addition to his film work, Jones played the role of Bobby in the original Broadway cast of Stephen Sondheim's Company in 1970.

Jones died in Los Angeles on Tuesday, according to his publicist, Richard Hoffman. The cause of death is reportedly related to Parkinson's disease.

More than two years after accusations arose that Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat's 2004 death was the result of polonium-210 poisoning, French judges say there isn't enough evidence to support the claim that Arafat was murdered.

"At the end of the investigation ... it has not been demonstrated that Mr Yasser Arafat was murdered by polonium-210 poisoning," the judges said, according to France 24.

He was already serving a lengthy prison sentence; now onetime St. Louis Rams running back Lawrence Phillips is being charged with murder in the death of his cellmate. Phillips was convicted of assaulting his girlfriend and other charges in 2006.

The new charges against Phillips, 40, stem from the death of his fellow inmate at the Kern Valley State Prison in California this past spring. Officials are accusing Phillips of strangling Damion Soward, 37.

In what reportedly is a first, five ships from China's navy have been spotted in the Bering Sea, operating in international waters off the Alaskan coast, Pentagon officials tell The Wall Street Journal.

The newspaper reports:

Both the Nasdaq and the Dow Jones index were hit by losses Tuesday, as concerns again rose about China's economy. The Dow is now down nearly 10 percent in 2015, after falling 469 points Tuesday to close at 16,058.

Markets in Europe and Asia also suffered, after renewed worries about a slowdown in China, the world's second-largest economy.

"The latest evidence is China's purchasing manager's index," NPR's John Ydstie reports, "which shows the country's manufacturing sector contracting."

More than a month after his trial on murder charges ended in a mistrial for the second time, former Eutawville, S.C., police Chief Richard Combs has been sentenced to a year of home detention. Combs agreed to plead guilty to misconduct in office Tuesday.

Combs, who is white, was the head of the police department in the small town of Eutawville back in May 2011, when he shot and killed 54-year-old Bernard Bailey, who was black, as Bailey tried to drive away from the Eutawville Police Department.

In the latest high-profile change for the Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games, organizers withdrew their games' official logo Tuesday, after weeks of heavy criticism. A graphic designer had filed a lawsuit over the resemblance to his own work.

Belgian designer Olivier Debie first complained about the logo soon after it was unveiled in July, saying the image presented by Japanese designer Kenjiro Sano was too similar to one he created for the Theatre de Liège in 2011. Debie had noted that his logo was widely shared on Pinterest.

In a resolution that could have wide effects, California's prison system has agreed to change how it handles solitary confinement — and to review the cases of nearly 3,000 prisoners who are currently in solitary. The changes are part of the terms of a newly settled class-action lawsuit.

As part of the settlement, the state is agreeing to a central demand of the plaintiffs: to stop placing inmates in solitary confinement solely because of a gang affiliation.

"Lawyers for the prisoners say more than 1,500 people could be moved out of solitary," NPR's Carrie Johnson reports.

A jury has found Frazier Glenn Cross Jr., also known as Frazier Glenn Miller Jr., guilty of murder for killing three people in attacks at a Jewish community center and a Jewish retirement home near Kansas City, Mo. The jury will next decide whether he should be executed.

In their deliberations, the jurors took less than two hours to return the guilty verdict, The Kansas City Star reports.

Terry Loewen, who pleaded guilty to attempting to drive an explosives-laden vehicle and detonate it at an airport in Wichita, Kan., has been sentenced to 20 years in federal prison. Loewen, an avionics technician, had an employee access card at the airport.

Loewen was arrested in 2013; investigators said he spent months planning his attack, discussing his work with what he thought was a group of conspirators — but was actually a team of undercover FBI agents.

From member station KMUW in Wichita, Abigail Wilson reports:

The ride-hailing service Uber has served more than 1 million customers in Philadelphia, despite operating under disputed terms for nearly a year. Now the city's regulators are taking the company to court.

Uber says it doesn't plan to stop operating in the city where it first launched service last October.

Wayne Dyer, the writer, philosopher and motivational speaker who encouraged millions of people to look at their lives in a new way, died this weekend at age 75. Over four decades, Dyer sought to motivate people to explore their passions and turn away from negativity.

Dyer died late Saturday in Maui, according to his publisher, Hay House.

After a last-ditch effort to reach a settlement in the legal dispute over the NFL's four-game suspension of quarterback Tom Brady, a federal judge says he'll issue his ruling on Brady's appeal on either Tuesday or Wednesday.

On Monday morning, Brady and NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell attended discussions about a possible settlement. But after it became clear that the two sides don't intend to give ground, District Judge Richard Berman held a brief hearing to announce that he'll rule on the case early this week.

Al Arbour, who set an NHL record by coaching 1,500 games, has died at age 81. As the head coach of the New York Islanders, he led the team to four Stanley Cup championships in 19 seasons. He also won four NHL titles as a player.

"Al will always be remembered as one of, if not the, greatest coaches ever to stand behind a bench in the history of the National Hockey League," Islanders President and General Manager Garth Snow said, as the team announced Arbour's death Friday.

One week before the school's football season starts, the University of Illinois has fired head coach Tim Beckman, saying a review had found "efforts to deter injury reporting and influence medical decisions that pressured players to avoid or postpone medical treatment and continue playing despite injuries."

Illini Director of Athletics Mike Thomas fired Beckman on Friday. A school statement says the decision was made "in the best interests of student-athletes."

His power and talent tested the nuts and bolts of basketball — literally. Darryl Dawkins, who became famous for backboard-shattering dunks after he was the first NBA player to skip college altogether, has died at age 58.

Lehigh Carbon Community College, where Dawkins coached for two seasons, says:

For elite Jamaican runner Usain Bolt, Thursday's 200-meter sprint was like many other races he's won — until a mobile cameraman lost control of his Segway and took the world's fastest man down from behind. Bolt, who had been waving to the crowd, collapsed in a heap. He had been walking barefoot on the track.

Seven deputies in Klamath County, Ore., have been on leave this week, after county commissioners agreed to their request. The move comes a month after Klamath County Sheriff Frank Skrah learned he was being investigated by Oregon's Department of Justice.

Citing an attorney who represents the Klamath County Peace Officers Association, Oregon Public Broadcasting says the deputies feared retaliation from the sheriff, after they were interviewed by the Oregon Department of Justice.

The U.S. financial markets finally closed on a high note Wednesday, with gains of nearly 4 percent seen in both the Dow Jones index and the S&P 500 — and even higher gains for the Nasdaq index.

The rally follows six days of losses for markets that have been shaken by news about China's currency and economy.

NPR's Joel Rose reports:

Vester Lee Flanagan, who police say shot and killed two of his former colleagues from a Virginia TV station before dying hours later of a self-inflicted gunshot wound, seems to have sent a 23-page fax to ABC News that discusses his reasons for the attack.

"We are sad to report that the smaller of the two panda cubs has died," the National Zoo announced Wednesday, in an update on the twin giant pandas that were born Saturday.

The two cubs were born hours apart; the zoo staff had been attempting to give both of them access to their mother, Mei Xiang, but they reportedly had difficulty in switching the cubs.

"Haven't been able to swap cubs since 2p 8/24," the zoo tweeted around midday Tuesday, adding, "Mei has larger cub. Smaller cub's behaviors are good; still high-risk time."

Amelia Boynton Robinson, who went from being beaten on a bridge in Selma, Ala., in 1965 to being pushed across the bridge in a wheelchair alongside the president of the United States, has died at age 104.

Her daughter, Germaine Bowser, confirmed to Troy Public Radio's Kyle Gassiott that Boynton Robinson died early Wednesday morning. She had been hospitalized after suffering several strokes this summer.

Nearly one month after its release, the Windows 10 operating system has been installed on more than 75 million devices, according to Microsoft. That figure reflects worldwide adoptions of the OS that, for now at least, is a free upgrade. Windows 10 is Microsoft's most substantial update since 2012.

Microsoft Vice President Yusuf Mehdi announced Tuesday that the new operating system is running in 192 countries, and on a wide range of devices, including ones made as early as 2007.

More than a month after Sandra Bland died in a Texas jail, a city is naming the street on which Bland was arrested after her. Bland, 28, was found dead in her cell on July 13; her mother and other supporters were present for Tuesday night's Prairie View City Council vote.

From Houston Public Media, Syeda Hasan reports for our Newscast unit:

With angry street protests complaining about both political dysfunction and a garbage-collection crisis, members of Lebanon's Cabinet rejected the winning waste management bid Tuesday.

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