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NPR Story
3:00 am
Mon March 26, 2012

Business News

Royal Dutch Shell can't pay the $1 billion it owes Iran because of sanctions imposed on the Middle East country by the United States and European Union. The sanctions have made it nearly impossible to transfer the money. Reuters reports that Shell is trying to wrap up its business dealings with Iran.

NPR Story
3:00 am
Mon March 26, 2012

Businessman Chosen As Hong Kong's Next Leader

A selection committee in Hong Kong has chosen a former Cabinet chief as the southern Chinese financial hubs next leader. The voters were handpicked by Beijing. Leung Chun-ying's term will start in July.

NPR Story
3:00 am
Mon March 26, 2012

Michigan Furniture Maker Celebrates 100 Years

Originally published on Mon March 26, 2012 5:45 am

Transcript

DAVID GREEENE, HOST:

Steelcase, the world's largest office furniture maker, is celebrating 100 years in business. But sales of the metal filing cabinets Steelcase is named for are declining - same with cubicles and other large pieces of office furniture.

LINDSEY SMITH, BYLINE: So, as Michigan Radio's Lindsey Smith reports, Steelcase says it's changing its identity.

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Asia
3:00 am
Mon March 26, 2012

Global Nuclear Summit Opens In South Korea

Originally published on Mon March 26, 2012 4:15 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning to you. I'm David Greene.

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Business
3:00 am
Mon March 26, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Mon March 26, 2012 6:17 am

Transcript

DAVID GREEENE, HOST:

And today's last word in business is an appetite for "The Hunger Games." Apparently a lot of people spent part of their weekend at the movie theater watching Katniss Everdeen run through the woods. The adventure film collected $155 million at box offices this weekend. That's the most ever for a film that is not a sequel.

Speaking of sequels, "Hunger Games" producers must be liking their odds in the future. They already have a sequel in the works. It is scheduled to start filming this fall.

Law
3:00 am
Mon March 26, 2012

Supreme Court Watchers Vie For Front Row Seats

Originally published on Mon March 26, 2012 4:29 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Today the U.S. Supreme Court begins hearing oral arguments on the president's health care law. Six hours of arguments will be spread over three days. The court rarely takes that much time for a case. There are only 400 seats available inside the court. Outside the court, people began lining up as early as last Friday to get what they think could be a front row seat to history. NPR's Sonari Glinton reports from the steps of the Supreme Court.

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Law
3:00 am
Mon March 26, 2012

Employers Monitor Health Care Law Arguments

The Supreme Court won't rule on President Obama's health care case until June. Republicans vow to repeal the law if they win big in November. David Wessel, economics editor of The Wall Street Journal, talks to David Greene about how the ruling could affect doctors, hospitals, employers and consumers.

Latin America
11:01 pm
Sun March 25, 2012

Some Cuban-Americans Wary As Cuba Welcomes Pope

A man rides his bicycle past a billboard welcoming Pope Benedict XVI, just days before his arrival, in Havana, Cuba. Pope Benedict's trip to Latin America includes Mexico and Cuba.
Javier Galeano AP

Originally published on Mon March 26, 2012 2:05 am

In 1998, when Pope John Paul II made his historic visit to Cuba, few Cuban-Americans made the pilgrimage across the Florida straits.

But when Pope Benedict XVI arrives in Cuba on Monday, hundreds of Cuban-Americans will be on hand in Santiago de Cuba when he celebrates Mass.

Carlos Saladrigas is well-known in Miami's Cuban-American community. He's a prominent businessman and co-chairman of the Cuba Study Group, an organization working to make Cuba a free and open society. He'll be in Antonio Maceo Revolution Square for Mass.

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Shots - Health Blog
11:01 pm
Sun March 25, 2012

Cheney Operation Underscores Heart Transplant Issues

Dick Cheney is interviewed in New York in August 2011. The former vice president is recovering after having heart transplant surgery on Saturday.
Richard Drew AP

Former Vice President Dick Cheney is recovering from a heart transplant he received Saturday at Inova Fairfax Hospital in Falls Church, Va.

The operation makes Cheney among more than 2,300 Americans who get heart transplants every year.

Heart transplantation has come a long way since Christiaan Barnard stitched the heart of a young woman into the chest of a middle-aged man in South Africa in 1967. That transplant recipient died 18 days later. Today, recipients can expect to get a decade or more of life from their new hearts.

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Shots - Health Blog
11:01 pm
Sun March 25, 2012

Bird Flu Studies Getting Another Round Of Scrutiny By Panel

Health Department officials cull birds and put them in sacks after bird flu virus was detected in Bhubaneswar, India.
Biswaranjan Rout AP

Originally published on Mon March 26, 2012 7:50 am

In June of 2009, a committee met at the University of Wisconsin-Madison to do a routine safety review of proposed research projects.

One of those projects involved genetically modifying flu viruses. And during the review, the committee brought up the idea of "dual-use" research. "Dual use" means legitimate scientific work that's intended to advance science or medicine, but that also might be misused with the intent to do harm.

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Judging The Health Care Law
11:01 pm
Sun March 25, 2012

Supreme Court Word Search: Health Care

When the U.S. Supreme Court hears challenges to the Obama administration's health care law this week, the arguments will be complex, with questions about states' rights, mandatory insurance, and Medicaid.

To introduce those concepts — and to give the rest of us something to do while the court hears six hours of arguments — we offer a word search game. The grid below features many words you'll likely hear this week, as NPR's Nina Totenberg reports from the court.

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Shots - Health Blog
11:01 pm
Sun March 25, 2012

4 Questions That Could Make Or Break The Health Care Law

Does the Supreme Court have the jurisdiction to rule on the constitutionality of the health care law right now? That's the question the justices will consider during Monday's oral arguments.
Adam Cole NPR

It's the hottest ticket in Washington, D.C. Even the flossiest lawyers in town can't get a seat. Senators, congressmen, Cabinet and White House officials are all vying for a place.

At the U.S. Supreme Court, people have been lining up for days, waiting to hear this week's historic oral arguments on President Obama's health care law. The arguments will last for six hours over a three-day period, the longest argument in more than 40 years.

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Environment
11:01 pm
Sun March 25, 2012

Pipe Down! That Noise Might Affect Your Plants

Pinon pine trees like this one dominate Rattlesnake Canyon.
Jeff Mitton

Researchers haven't given much thought to the effect of noise and noise pollution on plants. After all, plants don't have ears — at least, not the kind you hear with — so there doesn't seem to be much point. But thanks to ecologist Clinton Francis, that could be about to change.

Francis is a postdoctoral researcher at the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center in North Carolina. But he has spent the past few years in northwestern New Mexico, studying noise pollution in Rattlesnake Canyon.

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Shots - Health Blog
11:01 pm
Sun March 25, 2012

Facebook May Not Be So Friendly For Those With Low Self-Esteem

Low self-esteem and Facebook aren't the best mix.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon March 26, 2012 7:44 am

Posting on Facebook is an easy way to connect with people, but it also can be a means to alienate them. That can be particularly troublesome for those with low self-esteem.

People with poor self-image tend to view the glass as half empty. They complain a bit more than everyone else, and they often share their negative views and feelings when face to face with friends and acquaintances.

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Health Care
3:33 pm
Sun March 25, 2012

Health Care Law Puts Free Clinics At A Crossroads

The Duchesne Clinic in Kansas City, Kan., is just one free clinic that might have to adjust the way it operates under the new health care law.
Elana Gordon KCUR

Originally published on Sun March 25, 2012 4:06 pm

Free health clinics have long been places people turn to when they don't have health insurance or any money to pay for care. But the health law's expansion of coverage puts free clinics in uncharted territory.

While the law goes before the Supreme Court this week, health providers are already gearing up for a surge in patients with insurance.

Around the country, hundreds of free clinics have been established over the past 50 years to treat patients like Patsy Duarte.

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Music Interviews
3:00 pm
Sun March 25, 2012

Susan Justice: Sometimes You Just Have To 'Eat Dirt'

To get away from a strict religious family, Susan Justice fled to New York in 2001 to busk on the streets.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon March 26, 2012 9:21 am

In a busy New York subway station, a man serenades passersby with a beat-up guitar. A few of them look up from their BlackBerrys and toss a little change in his guitar case. It's a scene that plays out in subways and streets around the world.

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Around the Nation
2:00 pm
Sun March 25, 2012

The Hooded Sweathshirt Becomes Unlikely Target

The hooded sweatshirt has become an unlikely but potent symbol since the shooting of Trayvon Martin. Fox's Geraldo Riviera went so far as to say that wearing a hoodie might have contributed to Trayvon's death last month. But for the organizer of the "million hoodie march" in New York, and for many young black men in Florida, wearing a hooded sweatshirt has become a form of protest against racial profiling in the wake of Trayvon's shooting. NPR's Joel Rose reports.

Arts & Life
2:00 pm
Sun March 25, 2012

Three-Minute Fiction: Round 8 Deadline

Originally published on Sun March 25, 2012 4:37 pm

Author Luis Alberto Urrea reminds listeners that the deadline for Round 8 of Three-Minute Fiction is tonight, Sunday, March 25, at 11:59 p.m. ET. All submissions must be received by then to be considered a valid entry in the contest. The story must begin with the sentence: "She closed the book, placed it on the table, and finally decided to walk through the door". As always, the story must be 600 words or less. To submit a story, go to npr.org/threeminutefiction.

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Around the Nation
2:00 pm
Sun March 25, 2012

Was Promise Of Pet Care After The Rapture A Hoax?

Originally published on Sun March 25, 2012 4:06 pm

Transcript

LAURA SULLIVAN, HOST:

An update now on a story we first told you about last spring. Bart Centre of New Hampshire claimed he was running a pet rescue business for animals in case they were left behind by owners during the rapture, or the end of times, as some Christians believe.

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Health Care
2:00 pm
Sun March 25, 2012

Obama's Health Care Law: Past, Present And Future

Tomorrow morning the Supreme Court begins a three-may marathon of oral arguments challenging President Obama's landmark health care law, the Affordable Care Act. Weekends on All Things Considered guest host Laura Sullivan previews the arguments with NPR legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg. She also speaks to Mark Gross, owner of a professional line standing service, who is poised to have a lucrative week, and Jeff Rother of the National Coalition on Health Care walks us back through health reform's tempestuous path to the Supreme Court.

Author Interviews
1:06 pm
Sun March 25, 2012

Teddy Roosevelt's 'Doomed' War On New York Vice

The Bowery, under the shadow of the elevated train tracks in New York City, bustled at night with colored lights and cane-swirling barkers, in places such as the Lyceum Concert Garden.
E. Idell Zeisloft Courtesy Doubleday

New York in the gilded age was a city of epic contrasts. Top-hatted swells in glossy carriages promenaded uptown, while just a few blocks south, poverty, crime and overcrowding were the order of the day.

And vice, let's not forget vice. New York was what was called a "wide-open" town, with gambling, prostitution and liquor available on almost every corner. The cops and the Democratic machine politicians of Tammany Hall mostly looked the other way — when they weren't actively involved.

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The Two-Way
12:20 pm
Sun March 25, 2012

Cheney Recovering After Heart Transplant

Former Vice President Dick Cheney is recovering from a heart transplant he received at a Virginia hospital.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

Former Vice President Dick Cheney is recovering Sunday from a heart transplant he received at a Virginia hospital.

As NPR's Don Gonyea reported: "Cheney had been on a waiting list for a new heart for more than 20 months, ever since surgery in 2010 to install a pump and external battery to deal with was described as 'end stage heart failure.'"

A statement released Saturday by a Cheney aide said that the former vice president and his family do not know the donor's identity. The statement said the family will be "forever grateful for this lifesaving gift."

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Music Interviews
9:07 am
Sun March 25, 2012

Lost In The Trees: A Golden Memorial Of Orchestral Folk

A Church That Fits Our Needs is Lost In The Trees' second album, a tribute to the late mother of frontman Ari Picker (second from left).
Annalee Harkins Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon March 26, 2012 7:51 am

The newest album from the folk outfit Lost in the Trees is a very personal one. Ari Picker, the creative force behind the band, began writing the songs for A Church That Fits Our Needs after the death of his mother, Karen Shelton. She was an artist herself, one who struggled with mental illness throughout her life. In 2008, she killed herself.

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Media
7:00 am
Sun March 25, 2012

Supreme Court Doesn't Budge On Push For Cameras

Not one second of the six hours of arguments on the health care law will be either seen or heard in real time by anyone not at the Supreme Court. The nation's highest court has turned down requests to allow live broadcasts of this week's historic proceedings.

Politics
7:00 am
Sun March 25, 2012

Cheney Begins Heart Transplant Recovery

Former Vice President Dick Cheney underwent a heart transplant Saturday, after waiting 20 months for a donor.

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