LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Arkansas could be in for some wild weather next week as spring-like temperatures give way to thunderstorms and a cold front that could be packing snow and freezing rain.

The National Weather Service says high temperatures will reach into the 60s and 70s Monday before a cold front pushes in from the Plains to the state, triggering showers and thunderstorms. Forecasters say some of the storms could be severe across southeast Arkansas.

The coldest temperatures of the year in Arkansas are expected to arrive later this week.

Meteorologist Jeff Hood with the National Weather Service said the temperatures, which have already been unseasonably low, are expected to drop even lower. Rain is expected for much of the state, but no significant snowfall is anticipated.


Some residents in Pemiscot County, Missouri may have felt an earthquake Friday morning.

Johnathan Reaves, KASU News


The City of Jonesboro is spending over one-and-a-half-million dollars on trying to fix drainage issues in Jonesboro.  This after record flooding in May where six inches of rain fell in a three hour time frame.   Jonesboro is dedicating full time resources to five major projects that include clearing out and stabilizing over 60 miles of ditch maintenance in the city.  However,  that work might not be enough.

City of Jonesboro

Jonesboro’s mayor says clearing out the city’s ditches will be a full time job.  The Jonesboro City Council has approved the purchase of a Caterpillar excavator and hiring two employees to the city’s street department.  Harold Perrin tells KASU news the new equipment and manpower will be clearing out and maintaining the more than 60 miles of ditches in the city that are blamed for historic flooding that occurred in May.  He says it was deemed to be more cost effective to do it this way than to bring in an outside contractor to do the work “one-time”.

Arkansas State University

    Arkansas State University has conducted a full assessment of damage that was sustained after record flooding hit Jonesboro and much of Craighead County May 24th.  Between four to six inches of rain fell in a few hours, causing extensive damage to parts of the campus.  Executive Director of Marketing and Communications at Arkansas State is Dr. Bill Smith.  Smith says the turf field at Centennial Bank Stadium will have to be replaced.


  Even though Craighead County has officially been declared a disaster area, a call center may not be set up in the area until sometime next week. 

Craighead County Office of Emergency Management Director David Moore told the Jonesboro Sun Monday the Arkansas Department of Emergency Management told him to expect a delay in establishing the call center. 


  Craighead County has been declared a disaster area by Governor Asa Hutchinson. 

The official announcement came from a press release of the Craighead County Office of Emergency Management over the weekend.  Public Assistance Programs and Individual Assistance Programs have been authorized to assist eligible applicants affected by the May 24th Flood. 

City of Jonesboro

The city of Jonesboro is asking residents who have sustained damage from this week’s flooding event to contact them immediately.  City officials Thursday estimated 75 properties that sustained flood damage and are expecting the number to increase.  Reports of damage will be used to help the city receive state and federal assistance to help those affected.  

Please read the press release below for  more details on how to contact the city for assistance:

Brandon Tabor, KASU News

    Jonesboro city officials continue to assess the response after record rainfall pounded Jonesboro Tuesday night.  Over six inches of rain fell in a few hours, leading to hundreds of calls to 911, dozens of vehicles being stranded, 56 people being evacuated out of homes and led to shelter, 18 streets flooded out, and a 13-year-old boy being saved from rushing water.  In a press conference, Jonesboro Mayor Harold Perrin says he has been talking with other officials about the response to Tuesday’s

Brandon Tabor, KASU News


After a line of weekend storms moving through the area, 3 rivers in the KASU listening area have been placed under a flood warning until Wednesday.

The Associated Press reports forecasters said residents of Independence, Jackson, and Lawrence counties could be affected by the flooding of the Black River at Black Rock.  Sunday morning, the river was reported to be a little over 15 feet at minor flood stage; just about 1 foot above its 14 feet flood stage.


Wednesday Night storms caused major flooding around Jonesboro.  E-911 reported 32 calls within an hour for vehicles that were stalled out or flooded.   

Flash flooding on the east side of the city also prompted emergency officials to open the Allen Park Community Center on Race Street for shelter.

Storms also caused major to minor flooding for various rivers in the area.  The National Weather Service in Memphis reported major flooding at Nonconnah Creek at Riverport Road in Shelby County.  The river was observed at about 63 feet; about 17 feet above flood stage.

FEMA: 2 NEA Counties have 2 Weeks to Apply for Aid

Mar 22, 2016

Two Northeast Arkansas counties have about 2 weeks to receive federal relief from severe storms that hit the state in December and January.

The Associated Press reports the Federal Emergency Management Agency says residents in Jackson and Lee Counties have until April 5th to register for federal disaster aid.

11 counties who were affected by severe storms are eligible for assistance.  Funds can be used for rental assistance, repairs, and other damages caused by disasters not covered by insurance.


  The deadline for Missourians affected by winter flooding early in the year is today. 

KOLR-TV reports that 33 counties have been approved for individual assistance from the Federal Emergency Management Agency.  Scott County in the KASU listening area is the only county to have been granted assistance.