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Arkansas drivers may soon have access to a digital driver’s license in addition to a hard copy. The Arkansas Senate advanced a bill on Monday that would create and offer a digital license as an equivalent to the physical license at traffic stops and the like.

Alongside a physical license drivers could pay $10 for a digital copy provided by the Office of Drivers Services.

A late attempt to significantly alter a resolution limiting attorneys fees and injury lawsuit awards failed to get approval from the Arkansas House of Representatives Friday. 

Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Arkansas, faced more than 2,000 people at his town hall Wednesday evening in Springdale. Many of those in attendance expressed anger and frustration about issues ranging from the impending repeal of the Affordable Care Act to the proposed border wall with Mexico. You can listen to the full town hall below. It's been divided into two parts. Cotton began the town hall with the Pledge of Allegiance.


JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens is shunning the state plane and instead relying on private donors and campaign funds to pay for his flights.

Since taking office in January, the Republican governor has not flown on a state airplane. That's a significant departure from his Democratic predecessor, Jay Nixon, who frequently used state airplanes.

Greitens' Chief of Staff Michael Roche says the governor is committed to spending as little of the taxpayers' money as possible on travel.

A push to call for a convention of the states to propose amendments to the U.S. Constitution to redefine marriage and abortion rights narrowly failed in the Arkansas Senate. Article V of the U.S. Constitution allows for states to join together to propose amendments. It’s never been used before, but speaking on the floor on Monday state Senator Jason Rapert said it’s the only tool he has left.

Rapert proposed two separate resolutions. The first would redefine marriage as between one man and one woman. The second would say life begins at conception and effectively ban abortion.

President Donald Trump’s popularity in Arkansas has not diminished since the November election despite national polling that suggests voter attitude shifts. Meanwhile, Arkansas voters still solidly approve of the job Gov. Asa Hutchinson is doing a little more than halfway through his first term.

Trump Meets Netanyahu, Annotated

Feb 15, 2017
NPR

President Trump is the latest in a succession of U.S. presidents pledging unbreakable support for Israel. Last year, for instance, the US signed a $38-Billion military aid package with the Israelis even as Washington pressed Israel to make peace with the Palestinians. As a presidential candidate, Donald Trump signaled an intent to bolster Israel in even more demonstrative ways. But lately, in the early days of the Trump administration, the language of support has become somewhat less robust. 

Talk Business & Politics

In this congressional interview, KASU News Director Johnathan Reaves asks Congressman Rick Crawford listener questions about President Trump's executive order concerning travel bans, repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act and his thoughts on government funding of the arts, humanities and the Corporation of Public Broadcasting.  He was also asked about a new farm bill and regulations.  Click on the Listen button to hear the interview.  

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Tennessee lawmakers are scrambling to get their legislative proposals submitted before Thursday's filing deadline.

Among the last batch of bills is a renewed effort to require transgender students to use bathrooms and locker rooms corresponding to the gender listed on their birth certificates. Other recently filed bills would allow people with handgun carry permits to be armed in schools, drop a ban on Sunday liquor sales and get rid of open primary voting in Tennessee.

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Lawmakers are questioning a newly revised policy allowing visitors to bring firearms into the Missouri Capitol.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch (http://bit.ly/2k83UVx) reports that Gov. Eric Greitens' administration lifted a month-old prohibition Monday on allowing people with concealed-weapon permits to carry their guns into the statehouse.

Members of a Senate panel recommended Wednesday to look at potentially changing the rules that govern what happens with firearms inside the Capitol.

Gov. Asa Hutchinson is suggesting the Arkansas Legislature might be able to wrap up the 2017 session earlier than expected. Wednesday he praised lawmakers for "setting aside peripheral issues" and focusing on important matters.

The Republican governor has seen passage of three key issues he had for this session: a tax cut for low income residents, an exemption of income taxes for the pensions of military retirees and a change to the state’s higher education funding model. Hutchinson's comments came immediately after signing the bill moves funding for public colleges and universities from being based on enrollment to a "performance-based" formula.

A bill to require Arkansas political candidates file their campaign finance reports through an online system advanced out of a committee in the Arkansas House of Representatives Wednesday.

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens has appointed two new heads of the state's emergency management and fire safety divisions.

Greitens appointed Ernie Rhodes to be the director of the State Emergency Management Agency and Tim Bean as the state Fire Marshal in an announcement Wednesday at the St. Louis Fire Academy.

Rhodes currently serves as the fire chief for the West County EMS and Fire Protection District. He previously served as the director of Emergency Management in St. Charles, Missouri.

Wikipedia

ST. LOUIS (AP) — Three months after losing his bid for the U.S. Senate, former Democratic Missouri Secretary of State Jason Kander is launching an organization that's taking a new approach to fight what he calls voter suppression efforts.

Kander on Tuesday announced an organization called Let America Vote. A 27-member advisory board includes elected officials from across the country, communications leaders, and activists that include Martin Luther King III, the son of the slain civil rights leader.

A bill headed to the Arkansas Senate would give the governor more long-lasting authority to fill a vacant U.S. Senate seat. The Arkansas House approved the measure on Monday, which re-affirms the governor’s power to appoint a temporary, replacement Senator while extending the period of time before an election would be held.

Eric Greitens Official Facebook Page

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Republican Gov. Eric Greitens is signing a bill to make Missouri the 28th right-to-work state on Monday, delivering a big win for primarily GOP supporters who have worked for years to pass the measure banning mandatory union fees and dues.

The bill signing in Missouri comes amid a national push to implement the policy. Republicans in Congress have introduced a version of right-to-work legislation that would, for the first time, allow millions of workers to opt out of union membership.

KASU News

In this interview with U.S. Senator John Boozman, KASU's News Director Johnathan Reaves asks about the confirmation process of President Donald Trump's picks, executive orders, and answers listener's questions.  

Republican State Rep. Jana Della Rosa of Rogers is renewing her effort to make Arkansas political candidates’ campaign finance reports more searchable. Della Rosa filed a bill this week requiring legislative, judicial and constitutional office candidates to enter their campaign finance information electronically through a new online system.

The Arkansas Secretary of State’s office is currently installing the system. Della Rosa says the measure will allow people to more easily see who contributes to candidates.

Arkansas’s federal office holders are roundly praising President Donald Trump’s U.S. Supreme Court pick. Members of the state’s all-Republican congressional delegation weighed in late Tuesday after Neil Gorsuch was nominated the nation’s highest court.

U.S. Senator Tom Cotton (R-Dardanelle) commended the pick and had a favorable first impression. In a statement, Cotton noted the pick will have an impact for decades to come.

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — A partner at a global management consulting firm who was hired as Missouri's first chief operating officer is set to begin his job of increasing state government efficiency next month.

The Springfield News-Leader (http://sgfnow.co/2jc9WZL) reports that the start date for Drew Erdmann is Feb. 13.

Press secretary Parker Briden wouldn't say how much Erdmann will be paid. Salary figures for employees of the governor's office are a public record, but not so for Erdmann as he has not yet officially started work.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Republican Gov. Bill Haslam is scheduled to release his second major priority item for the 2017 legislative session on Thursday.

Haslam's office says the governor will discuss his proposal before a visit to Cane Ridge High School in Nashville. A news release didn't elaborate on the subject of his announcement, other than to say it is part of his larger effort of "building and sustaining economic growth and the state's competitiveness for the next generation of Tennesseans."

A revamped effort to establish a voter identification requirement in Arkansas is making headway in the state Legislature.

Republican Rep. Mark Lowery of Maumelle is the sponsor of HB1047, which would amend the Arkansas Constitution and require voters to show photo identification at the polls. It’s the second attempt to bring a voter ID statute to the state.

In Washington the Republican-controlled Congress is speeding toward a repeal of the Affordable Care Act. While GOP leadership at the Arkansas state Capitol has said lawmakers should wait and see what happens, some conservative members of the legislature want action now.

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Airport, trucking and business officials all are urging Missouri lawmakers to change state driver's license laws to comply with federal identification requirements.

A Senate committee heard testimony Thursday on legislation that would allow two options for driver's licenses — one that complies with the federal Real ID act and another that doesn't.

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