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A split Jonesboro City Council did not pass an ordinance that would have allowed for a large apartment complex to be built on South Caraway Road in Jonesboro.  The vote was 6 voting for the project and 5 against the project...the ordiance needed 7 votes.  Alderman Chris Gibson was absent for the meeting.  The complex would have established 300 multi-family units.  The property is currently zoned for commercial property and the request was for the area to be rezoned for residential property.

Arkansas State University

This is an interview between KASU News Director Johnathan Reaves and the next Chancellor for Arkansas State University, Dr. Kelly Damphousse.  He starts work July 1.  In this interview, Damphousse discusses his plans for his first 100 days, his long-term goals and priorities at Arkansas State, his views on the challenges higher education face today, and more.  Click on the Listen button to listen to the interview.    

Wikipedia

A provision that allows a portion of U-S Highway 67 to have an interstate designation is now law.  Highway 67-167 from North Little Rock to Walnut Ridge now has an additional designation as “Future I-57”.  The provision was authored by U-S Senator John Boozman.  Arkansas State Highway Transportation Department spokesman Danny Straessle says the state has spent hundreds of millions of dollars over the past 50 years to make Highway 67 an interstate-quality road.  He tells what is next in the process to make the highway an interstate.

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The Jonesboro Advertising and Promotion Commission will not fund any convention centers…at this time.   Chairman Jerry Morgan says the project the city put 75-thousand dollars toward has had problems securing funding for the project.  Last month, the Commission required the Northeast Arkansas Hotel and Convention Center group return the money until the project was nearing completion on construction.  It had also asked for several stipulations to be met by the group, which were not.  

During the 60th anniversary of KASU, it is only appropriate to turn attention to the future of KASU.  What will the next 60 years hold for KASU?  To answer that question, it is important to look at how public broadcasting stations are funded. 

During our KASU Sixtieth Anniversary celebration, we’ve been broadcasting historical features like this one, produced by station manager Mike Doyle.  Mike interviewed an A-State alumnus who has had a long career in broadcast and print media advertising sales after working at KASU during his years as a student majoring in radio-television.  Listen to the entire interview above.  

KASU is a station that has had many broadcasting "firsts" in its 60 years.  In this story, we will look at some of the ways KASU has been the first station in the region, and in some cases, in the state at certain accomplishments.  The series started with the mention that KASU is the oldest non-commercial radio station in Arkansas.  Notice I said it is not the FIRST non-commercial radio station.  Retired Department Chair of Radio-TV and KASU station manager Richard Carvell explains:

Johnathan Reaves, KASU News

40 faculty of the University of Arkansas are on a bus tour of the state.  The 800-mile tour covers 24 counties in the state to learn more about the people and places that make the state unique.  Arkansas State University in Jonesboro hosted a lunch and participated in some of the tours of the ASU Heritage Sites.  

The universities are already involved in a handful of collaborations, including a dual degree program involving poultry sciences signed earlier this year. 

Today, we have a wide range of choices when it comes to programming.  No matter whether it is TV, radio or other forms of media, there are lots of choices.  KASU gets a lot of its programming from NPR, which comes to the station through satellite feeds.  Which made me wonder...what was it like during the early days of KASU?  How did KASU fill those hours of programming?  Professor in the Department of Media Dr. Mary Jackson-Pitts says in the 1950s, many newly formed FM stations had a hard time finding programming.

Friday, May 17th, 1957.  KASU radio station signed on the air on the campus of Arkansas State College in Jonesboro.  The frequency is 91.9 FM.  The station broadcasted out of the Wilson Hall building and the signal strength was 760 watts…which gave the station a coverage distance of 20 miles.  Dr. Carl R. Reng was extremely pleased with KASU.  He gave the opening speech when KASU signed on the air…the Arkansas State Band performed a concert…and interviews were conducted on air with students and faculty members.  Reng was the president of Arkansas State College.

For KASU, I’m Johnathan Reaves.  60 years ago, KASU signed on to the air with these words:

"Good afternoon, everyone.  KASU, an educational non-commercial radio station, now begins broadcast operations on this day, the seventeenth of May, 1957."       

Mike's Music News

Congressman Rick Crawford joins KASU News Director Johnathan Reaves for an interview about President Trump's air strike on Syria, Russia relations and the next move with health care reform.  

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Encouraging lawmakers to make informed policy decisions when it comes to legislation about science…that is the goal of a march that occurs this month at the state capitol in Little Rock.  The theme for the event is “Stand Up for Science.” Dr. Michele Merritt is assistant professor of philosophy at Arkansas State University.  She came up with the idea of a March for Science. 

"You don't have to be a scientist to appreciate science," says Merritt.  "I am not a science professor, but I rely on science and I wanted to protect what I see is valuable research that is going on."

Arkansas State University

The 23rd Delta Symposium at Arkansas State University starts Wednesday, April 5th and runs through Saturday, April 8th.  Listen to the entire interview to get information about the festival.  The interview features Dr. Gregory Hansen with Arkansas State.  Learn more about the lineup of the festival symposium here.    

Johnathan Reaves, KASU News

Arkansas State University Athletics Director Terry Mohajir introduced the next men’s basketball coach at Arkansas State.  Mike Balado spent the last four season as an assistant coach at the University of Louisville.  

Arkansas State University

In this interview, KASU's News Director Johnathan Reaves talks with Dr. Adam Long with the Hemingway-Pfeiffer Museum and Educational Center in Piggot.  Dr. Long talks about the center and the upcoming spring trip to Cuba.  Several openings are still available for the trip.  Learn more by listening to the entire interview.    

Arkansas State University

A partnership between Arkansas’ two major universities will allow students to get a dual degree in poultry sciences.   

Arkansas leads the nation in poultry production.  With Tyson Foods in northwest Arkansas and Ozark Mountain Poultry and Peco Foods in eastern Arkansas, more graduates are needed in the field of poultry science. 

Arkansas State University

An annual music festival to celebrate the music of the Man in Black is literally being moved to the Johnny Cash Boyhood Home…or that is, next to the home.  

In 2011, Arkansas State University started the process of acquiring and restoring the Johnny Cash Boyhood Home in Dyess.  In order to raise funds for the project, the Johnny Cash Music Festival was held in Jonesboro. 

Over the years, the boyhood house, the old theatre building and the administration building have been restored under the first phase of the project, thanks to the proceeds from the music festival. 

KASU News

In this interview with U.S. Senator John Boozman, KASU's News Director Johnathan Reaves asks about the confirmation process of President Donald Trump's picks, executive orders, and answers listener's questions.  

Craighead County-Jonesboro Public Library

In 2017, the Craighead County-Jonesboro Public Library turns 100 years.   Public Relations Manager Brandi Hodges talks with KASU News Director Johnathan Reaves about the history of the museum and how the museum is evolving in a digital age.  Click on the Listen button for the entire interview.  

governor.arkansas.gov

UPDATE 1/6/17:  Due to Inclement Weather, the Political Animals Meeting has been canceled today. 

City of Jonesboro

Sidewalks are a must for all future construction in Jonesboro.  That was the message the Jonesboro Metropolitan Planning Commission received from concerned citizens in a recent meeting.  For over an hour, citizens pleaded with commissioners to require developers to make sidewalks part of their building plans.  The commissioners were considering ordinance changes to forward to the Jonesboro City Council about rezoning and sidewalks.  In the 1960’s, codes required sidewalks, but those regulations were relaxed and sidewalks were no longer required, which led to many areas of Jonesboro withou

Arkansas State University

Arkansas State University is using the current salary threshold in determining who is eligible for overtime.  Assistant Vice Chancellor for Human Resources Lori Winn says last week’s preliminary injunction from a federal court is what is behind the move. 

The new Fair Labor Standards Act, which would have been enacted this week, would require that salaried employees making under 47-thousand dollars would be eligible for overtime.  The new rules would have required those employees to clock in and clock out of a new Time Tracker System. 

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Arkansas is one of 37 states that is encouraging more girls and women to enter into STEM careers.  

STEM stands for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math.  Careers that fall into these categories are traditionally male-dominated.  A national push is underway to change that trend, and get more women involved.  The national effort is called Million Women Mentors. 

Johnathan Reaves, KASU News

Arkansas State University may not have a polling site for the mid-term elections.  Craighead County Clerk Kade Holliday says a lack of a road near the Military Science Building, and lack of parking, made it difficult for voters to cast their ballots.  

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