KASU

Morning Edition Feature

Johnathan Reaves, KASU News

Guns on campus, a new funding model, and the introduction of a new chancellor.  Those were the highlights from yesterday’s Fall Faculty Conference at Arkansas State University.  The topic that has caused a lot of concern from the campus community is a state law that was passed this year that will allow for concealed carry on the state’s colleges and universities.  Arkansas State University System President Dr. Charles Welch says many concerns were addressed to state lawmakers about the bill, which led to numerous concessions…however, at the end of the day.

Talk Business & Politics

Representative Rick Crawford talks with KASU News Director Johnathan Reaves about Charlottesville, what should be done about Confederate statues, where to go from here on Obamacare, and opening the China market to Arkansas agriculture.  Click on the Listen button to hear the interview.  

Senator Boozman Official Website

U.S. Senator John Boozman discusses several issues with KASU News Director Johnathan Reaves.  He discusses the latest situation with North Korea, Republicans wanting to repeal and replace Obamacare, China's agricultural markets, and why he has not attended town hall meetings that have been held during this recess.  Click on the "Listen" button to hear the interview.  

"The Circle" Dedicated

Aug 7, 2017
Ann Kenda, Arkansas Public Media

Four separate residence halls for graduate students and medical students at Arkansas State have been dedicated as The Circle.  The halls are named to honor the first African American professors and administrators at Arkansas State.  They came to Arkansas State in the 1970s.  Dr. Wilbert Gaines, Dr. Herman Strickland, and the families of the late Dr. C. Calvin Smith and the late Dr. Mossie Richmond were honored during the ceremony.  Associate Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs at Arkansas State University is Dr. Lonnie Williams.

Downtown Jonesboro BBQ & Music Festival Plans Announced

Jul 27, 2017
Talk Business and Politics

This is a press release:

The Jonesboro Advertising and Promotion Commission’s Downtown Jonesboro BBQ and Music festival announced plans for their 9th annual event Saturday, September 30th.

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The Craighead County Quorum Court unanimously approved 13-thousand-dollars for a needed upgrade to the radio system that rural firefighters use.  The analog systems will be converted to digital signals and improvements will be made in the 911 center for dispatchers to communicate with firefighters a lot easier.  Jeff Presley is the director of Jonesboro and Craighead County’s E-911

“It will be a command control radio system that will integrate into the current system and bring it up to date,” says Presley. 

City of Jonesboro

The Jonesboro City Council is accepting applications to fill a vacancy on the council.  

Darrel Dover resigned his position at last week’s meeting.  He is moving to Bentonville with his wife to spend more time with their grandchildren. 

Applicants who are interested in applying for the position must live in Ward 5.  Applicants must fill out paper work and submit at resume at the Jonesboro City Clerk’s Office, which is located in the City Clerk’s Office. 

The deadline for filing will be Tuesday afternoon at five.  The unexpired term lasts for the next 17 months.  

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The Jonesboro City Council passed a resolution supporting state and federal legislation that would enforce the collection of sales taxes from online transactions.  The resolution now goes to the Arkansas Municipal League in Little Rock, where officials will ask for Governor Asa Hutchinson to call for a special session in a few weeks to consider the legislation.  The state legislature voted down this legislation in the last session.  Last night’s city council vote was not unanimous as eight aldermen voted in support of the resolution and four voted against.  Jonesboro Mayor Harold Perrin.

Johnathan Reaves, KASU News

A Jonesboro Alderman is stepping down from the city council.  Darrel Dover was recognized by Jonesboro Mayor Harold Perrin for years of service on the council.  Dover was elected to the council in 2003.  He tells KASU news he has enjoyed his time of service on the council.

Johnathan Reaves, KASU News

Arkansas State University has launched the A-State Innovation System.  The system is designed to provide opportunities for entrepreneurs to access resources and bring ideas to the marketplace.  Grand opening ceremonies for the Innovation System were held Monday.  Ty Keller is the director of the A-State Innovation System.

Johnathan Reaves, KASU News

The Arkansas Highway and Transportation Department has released an initial drawing of a proposal to extend Commerce Lane from Interstate 555 to Highway 49 in Jonesboro.  Ruby Johnson is Public Involvement Section Head with the Highway Department.  She says the project is in the initial planning stages and could change over time. 

Talk Business and Politics

A split Jonesboro City Council did not pass an ordinance that would have allowed for a large apartment complex to be built on South Caraway Road in Jonesboro.  The vote was 6 voting for the project and 5 against the project...the ordiance needed 7 votes.  Alderman Chris Gibson was absent for the meeting.  The complex would have established 300 multi-family units.  The property is currently zoned for commercial property and the request was for the area to be rezoned for residential property.

Arkansas State University

This is an interview between KASU News Director Johnathan Reaves and the next Chancellor for Arkansas State University, Dr. Kelly Damphousse.  He starts work July 1.  In this interview, Damphousse discusses his plans for his first 100 days, his long-term goals and priorities at Arkansas State, his views on the challenges higher education face today, and more.  Click on the Listen button to listen to the interview.    

Wikipedia

A provision that allows a portion of U-S Highway 67 to have an interstate designation is now law.  Highway 67-167 from North Little Rock to Walnut Ridge now has an additional designation as “Future I-57”.  The provision was authored by U-S Senator John Boozman.  Arkansas State Highway Transportation Department spokesman Danny Straessle says the state has spent hundreds of millions of dollars over the past 50 years to make Highway 67 an interstate-quality road.  He tells what is next in the process to make the highway an interstate.

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The Jonesboro Advertising and Promotion Commission will not fund any convention centers…at this time.   Chairman Jerry Morgan says the project the city put 75-thousand dollars toward has had problems securing funding for the project.  Last month, the Commission required the Northeast Arkansas Hotel and Convention Center group return the money until the project was nearing completion on construction.  It had also asked for several stipulations to be met by the group, which were not.  

During the 60th anniversary of KASU, it is only appropriate to turn attention to the future of KASU.  What will the next 60 years hold for KASU?  To answer that question, it is important to look at how public broadcasting stations are funded. 

During our KASU Sixtieth Anniversary celebration, we’ve been broadcasting historical features like this one, produced by station manager Mike Doyle.  Mike interviewed an A-State alumnus who has had a long career in broadcast and print media advertising sales after working at KASU during his years as a student majoring in radio-television.  Listen to the entire interview above.  

KASU is a station that has had many broadcasting "firsts" in its 60 years.  In this story, we will look at some of the ways KASU has been the first station in the region, and in some cases, in the state at certain accomplishments.  The series started with the mention that KASU is the oldest non-commercial radio station in Arkansas.  Notice I said it is not the FIRST non-commercial radio station.  Retired Department Chair of Radio-TV and KASU station manager Richard Carvell explains:

Johnathan Reaves, KASU News

40 faculty of the University of Arkansas are on a bus tour of the state.  The 800-mile tour covers 24 counties in the state to learn more about the people and places that make the state unique.  Arkansas State University in Jonesboro hosted a lunch and participated in some of the tours of the ASU Heritage Sites.  

The universities are already involved in a handful of collaborations, including a dual degree program involving poultry sciences signed earlier this year. 

Today, we have a wide range of choices when it comes to programming.  No matter whether it is TV, radio or other forms of media, there are lots of choices.  KASU gets a lot of its programming from NPR, which comes to the station through satellite feeds.  Which made me wonder...what was it like during the early days of KASU?  How did KASU fill those hours of programming?  Professor in the Department of Media Dr. Mary Jackson-Pitts says in the 1950s, many newly formed FM stations had a hard time finding programming.

Friday, May 17th, 1957.  KASU radio station signed on the air on the campus of Arkansas State College in Jonesboro.  The frequency is 91.9 FM.  The station broadcasted out of the Wilson Hall building and the signal strength was 760 watts…which gave the station a coverage distance of 20 miles.  Dr. Carl R. Reng was extremely pleased with KASU.  He gave the opening speech when KASU signed on the air…the Arkansas State Band performed a concert…and interviews were conducted on air with students and faculty members.  Reng was the president of Arkansas State College.

For KASU, I’m Johnathan Reaves.  60 years ago, KASU signed on to the air with these words:

"Good afternoon, everyone.  KASU, an educational non-commercial radio station, now begins broadcast operations on this day, the seventeenth of May, 1957."       

Mike's Music News

Congressman Rick Crawford joins KASU News Director Johnathan Reaves for an interview about President Trump's air strike on Syria, Russia relations and the next move with health care reform.  

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Encouraging lawmakers to make informed policy decisions when it comes to legislation about science…that is the goal of a march that occurs this month at the state capitol in Little Rock.  The theme for the event is “Stand Up for Science.” Dr. Michele Merritt is assistant professor of philosophy at Arkansas State University.  She came up with the idea of a March for Science. 

"You don't have to be a scientist to appreciate science," says Merritt.  "I am not a science professor, but I rely on science and I wanted to protect what I see is valuable research that is going on."

Arkansas State University

The 23rd Delta Symposium at Arkansas State University starts Wednesday, April 5th and runs through Saturday, April 8th.  Listen to the entire interview to get information about the festival.  The interview features Dr. Gregory Hansen with Arkansas State.  Learn more about the lineup of the festival symposium here.    

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