Little Rock Nine

Little Rock Central High School in Arkansas is no stranger to protest. Sixty years ago, following the Supreme Court's historic Brown v. Board of Education ruling, Central drew national attention as nine black students attempted to integrate the previously all-white school.

The story of the 1957 desegregation of Little Rock’s Central High School by nine black students is well known. But overshadowed is phase two of the school district’s desegregation plan, which involved 25 students attending five previously all-white junior high schools in 1961 and 1962.

This is the 6:04 KASU newscast for Tuesday, September 26th.  

Here are the stories reported this morning:

The anniversary of the desegregation of Central High School in Little Rock has brought national attention to Little Rock and renewed interest in the nine students who made history this month 60 years ago, even as a number of Little Rock residents talk of re-segregation of the school district and the ongoing state control of the city's public schools.

This is the 6:04 KASU newscast for Monday, September 25th.  

Here are the stories reported this morning:

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Former President Bill Clinton is returning to his home state of Arkansas to speak at an event marking the 60th anniversary of Little Rock Central High School's desegregation.

Organizers announced Wednesday that the 42nd president will deliver the keynote address at the Sept. 25 ceremony. The event will take place in the Roosevelt Thompson Auditorium at the school.

As Arkansas governor, Clinton hosted the nine black students at the Governor's Mansion in 1987 where they all gathered in Little Rock for the first time since the 1957-1958 school year.

Brandon Tabor, KASU news

Students, lawmakers, and activists celebrate the nonviolence philosophy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. while honoring the Hoxie school integration at the 16th Annual Nonviolence Youth Summit at Arkansas State University. 

The theme of Monday's summit was “Remember Hoxie.” 

DuShun Scarbrogh, Arkansas Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Commission CEO,  explains to the youth in attendance the reason for honoring Hoxie:

Ethel Tompkins served as the keynote speaker for the summit.  Tompkins was the first African American woman to graduate from Hoxie Public Schools.