KASU

Justice

This is the 6:04 KASU newscast for Friday, October 6th.  

This is the 6:04 KASU newscast for Thursday, October 5th.  

This is the 6:04 KASU newscast for Wednesday, October 4th.  

This is the 6:04 KASU newscast for Tuesday, October 3rd.  

This is the 6:04 KASU newscast for Monday, October 2nd.  

This is the 6:04 KASU newscast for Friday, September 29th.  

This is the 6:04 KASU newscast for Thursday, September 28th.  

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — A federal judge has blocked an Arkansas anti-loitering law that opponents say unfairly targets panhandlers, calling it "plainly unconstitutional" and saying that other laws address the safety concerns state officials cited as the need for the restrictions.

This is the 6:04 KASU newscast for Wednesday, September 27th.  

This is the 6:04 KASU newscast for Tuesday, September 26th.  

Here are the stories reported this morning:

The anniversary of the desegregation of Central High School in Little Rock has brought national attention to Little Rock and renewed interest in the nine students who made history this month 60 years ago, even as a number of Little Rock residents talk of re-segregation of the school district and the ongoing state control of the city's public schools. 

At a symposium on Saturday, the Little Rock Nine and their families told stories about segregation. Ernest Green’s sister Judy said their parents inspired them to stand up.

Seven months after the Arkansas Supreme Court ruled Fayetteville's LGBT-inclusive civil rights ordinance did not comport with state law, a lower court must now decide if that law is even constitutional.

In Washington County Circuit Court before Judge Doug Martin, lawyers on both sides argued over discovery motions and the right to stay administration of Fayetteville's civil rights ordinance and enforcement commission. In place for two years, the ordinance was established explicitly to protect LGBT residents and visitors from discrimination -- because state law does not. 

Potential operators of medical marijuana cultivation facilities and dispensaries came together at a half-day symposium in Little Rock Wednesday to discuss their expectations of what the new industry will be like.

Among the attendees was TV host Montel Williams, who gave the keynote address at the event organized by the Arkansas Medical Marijuana Association. Williams has multiple sclerosis, and has long advocated for medicinal cannabis use. His visit had added significance, since he recently accepted a position on the association’s board.

Arkansas' highest court says Pulaski County judges can hold resentencing hearings for seven inmates sentenced to life terms as juveniles, potentially setting a course for how courts statewide should handle cases from similar inmates in other counties.

The U.S. Supreme Court has said juvenile offenders cannot be sentenced to life terms without at least a chance at parole. Arkansas legislators subsequently declared such inmates parole-eligible after a term of years, but Pulaski County judges want each inmate to receive an individualized resentencing hearing.

This is the 6:04 KASU newscast for Friday, September 22th.  

Here are the stories reported this morning:

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Government lawyers want Arkansas' highest court to reverse a ruling that requires prison officials to reveal more information about their execution drugs, saying further disclosure would make it impossible for the state to acquire lethal injection drugs.

This is the 6:04 KASU newscast for Thursday, September 21th.  

Judge to decide if state must provide execution drug labels

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — An Arkansas judge has opened a hearing on whether the state must give a lawyer package labels from recently acquired execution drugs.

Lawyer Steven Shults says the state's Freedom of Information law requires Arkansas to hand over information about the drugs.

Lawyers for the state say a different portion of the law says the material must be kept secret.

ST. JOSEPH, Mo. (AP) — The Missouri State Highway Patrol troopers will all be carrying an opioid overdose reversal medication once they complete training.

The News-Press reports troopers, park rangers and conservation agents gathered at the patrol's headquarters on last month for training on how to use Naloxone, also known as Narcan.

This is the 6:04 KASU newscast for Tuesday, September 19th.  Here are the stories reported this morning:

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — An Arkansas trial has been delayed for a Tennessee rapper and his bodyguard, who face federal weapons charges

The scheduled Monday trial of Ricky Hampton, who performs as Finese2Tymes, and bodyguard Kentrell Gwynn, both of Memphis, was postponed on Friday until March 19.

Hampton is charged with being a felon in possession of a firearm in connection with a shooting outside a nightclub in eastern Arkansas and Gwynn is charged with providing a felon with a firearm and with providing armed security to a felon.

Both have pleaded not guilty.

This is the 6:04 KASU newscast for Monday, September 18th.  Here are the stories reported this morning:

This is the 6:04 KASU newscast for Thursday, September 14th.  Here are the stories reported this morning:

MOUNTAIN HOME, Ark. (AP) — Voters in Baxter County have approved two sales tax measures that will expand the county jail and fund Mountain Home's fire and police departments.

Voters on Tuesday approved an eight-month, 1 percent sales tax that will pay for 50 new beds at the Baxter County jail, along with a 0.25 percent sales tax to pay for maintenance and operation of the jail.

This is the 6:04 KASU newscast for Tuesday, September 12th.  Here are the headlines reported this morning:

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