KASU

Craighead County Justice of the Peace

Johnathan Reaves, KASU News

Monday night was the first Craighead County Quorum Court meeting without a longtime Justice of the Peace.  

Jim Bryant passed away recently after an illness.  He represented District 3.  Bryant served on the Quorum Court for 27 years.  Craighead County Judge Ed Hill said it was hard being at the meeting last night without Bryant.  Hill told what he remembered most about how Bryant served on the Quorum Court.

Wikipedia

It was not a unanimous decision, but the Craighead County Quorum Court passed an ordinance that serves as a nepotism policy.  

The ordinance says that relatives of those who work for Craighead County may not work for a relative that is “in the immediate line of supervision.”  Relatives can work for the county, as long as it is in another position, or in another department. The ordinance would also require that county workers disclose any business the county does with a family member of a county worker…and it deals with potential conflicts of interest. 

Craighead County

A spirited debate over Craighead County’s proposed nepotism ordinance. 

The full ordinance defines that family members would not be allowed to work with each other under a nepotism policy that is being debated by the Justices of the Peace. 

The ordinance would also require that county workers disclose any business the county does with a family member of a county worker…and it deals with potential conflicts of interest. 

Johnathan Reaves, KASU News

Arkansas State University may not have a polling site for the mid-term elections.  Craighead County Clerk Kade Holliday says a lack of a road near the Military Science Building, and lack of parking, made it difficult for voters to cast their ballots.  

Craighead Co. JPs to Get Docked Pay

Dec 16, 2015

  The Craighead County Quorum Court is deciding whether to dock the pay of several justices of the peace this month for missing meetings earlier in the year. 

The Jonesboro Sun reports about $4,000 was mistakenly paid to justices this year since January 1.  Since then, 5 justices missed a combined 16 meetings. 

Arkansas law only allows justices to be compensated for 1 missed meeting a year.  Also, state law requires justices to be compensated per meeting.  In the Sunday paper of the Sun, it was revealed the justices were still compensated even after missing one meeting.