KASU

Arkansas

Potential operators of medical marijuana cultivation facilities and dispensaries came together at a half-day symposium in Little Rock Wednesday to discuss their expectations of what the new industry will be like.

Among the attendees was TV host Montel Williams, who gave the keynote address at the event organized by the Arkansas Medical Marijuana Association. Williams has multiple sclerosis, and has long advocated for medicinal cannabis use. His visit had added significance, since he recently accepted a position on the association’s board.

Arkansas' highest court says Pulaski County judges can hold resentencing hearings for seven inmates sentenced to life terms as juveniles, potentially setting a course for how courts statewide should handle cases from similar inmates in other counties.

The U.S. Supreme Court has said juvenile offenders cannot be sentenced to life terms without at least a chance at parole. Arkansas legislators subsequently declared such inmates parole-eligible after a term of years, but Pulaski County judges want each inmate to receive an individualized resentencing hearing.

Elizabeth Eckford only had one concern before her first day of school. She wanted to make sure her white dress was finished so she could wear it. The next morning she was wearing the dress as her father paced back and forth in the hallway. She took a city bus to Little Rock Central High School. It was Sept. 4, 1957.

This is the 6:04 KASU newscast for Friday, September 22th.  

Here are the stories reported this morning:

Arkansas State University

Arkansas State University officials and Governor Asa Hutchinson are in Querétaro near Mexico City, Mexico for the dedication ceremony of the new ASU-Campus Querétaro.  All live video of the dedication is courtesy of Arkansas State University.

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Government lawyers want Arkansas' highest court to reverse a ruling that requires prison officials to reveal more information about their execution drugs, saying further disclosure would make it impossible for the state to acquire lethal injection drugs.

Williams Baptist receives University status

Sep 21, 2017
Williams Baptist University

This press release is from Williams Baptist University:

Williams Baptist College in Walnut Ridge announced Wednesday that, starting next fall, it will be known as Williams Baptist University.

“This is a monumental day in the history of this institution, reflecting a major step forward.  Williams has provided an outstanding, Christian higher education for the past 76 years, and being known as Williams Baptist University will help us to advance our programs even further,” said WBC President Dr. Tom Jones.

This is the 6:04 KASU newscast for Thursday, September 21th.  

This is the 6:04 KASU newscast for Wednesday, September 20th.  

Carl R. Reng Student Union
Arkansas State University

The Arkansas State University Board of Trustees recently approved a resolution to honor the late James E. and Wanda Lee Vaughn.  The Carl R. Reng Student Union's student lounge will be named after them. Watch the live video of the dedication of the new student lounge.

Judge to decide if state must provide execution drug labels

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — An Arkansas judge has opened a hearing on whether the state must give a lawyer package labels from recently acquired execution drugs.

Lawyer Steven Shults says the state's Freedom of Information law requires Arkansas to hand over information about the drugs.

Lawyers for the state say a different portion of the law says the material must be kept secret.

Vietnam veteran James Kaelin stands on a dirt road staring into an empty scrub forest once part of Fort Chaffee, a U.S. Army Training camp east of Fort Smith, Arkansas. 

“They won’t even admit to this being a test site to anybody,” Kaelin says. “But I have information showing the Army tested Agent Orange, Agent White and Agent Blue on seven different locations on Fort Chaffee in 1966 and 1967 without knowledge to the general public. It was top secret.”

At the ranch on County Road 766 in Jonesboro, a pretty silvery-white calf born just three days earlier was happily playing and running around on a field. He’s one of the newest members of Arkansas’s collective herd, population 1.75 million.

“The last bull we bought cost $3,600, and he’s a good bull, but probably the next one we buy will be higher than that.  You have to look for traits that will improve the calves that you already have,” said rancher Eric Grant. 

There’s a dent in the fence from when a massive bull tried to hurl himself through it to get to a cow.  The bull seems to have an uncanny sense for when a cow is in heat even several fields away, Grant said.

For interested onlookers like Arkansas Energy Office program manager Chet Howland, the filing today by the Net Metering Working Group is a not-unexpected, slight disappointment.

The group is the creation of the Public Service Commission (at the request of the General Assembly) to examine net metering: the practice of pushing the electricity generated by windmills or solar power systems back onto the grid, and getting credit for it from energy utilities.

Work is progressing ahead of a ceremonial groundbreaking on Nov. 9 for a National World War I Memorial in Washington, DC commemorating the service of Americans in the military. The memorial likely won’t be completed as initially hoped in time for 100th anniversary of the end of the war, but substantial work should be visible by then.

Would-be growers and distributors of Arkansas' initial medical marijuana crop have flooded a state office building waiting for their turn to submit applications.

Ahead of Monday afternoon's deadline, there was about a three-hour wait for applicants at the Department of Finance and Administration Building. Agency spokesman Scott Hardin said that before noon, the office had distributed paperwork to more than 100 groups or individuals. Fewer than half the applicants had been called in for clerks to review paperwork to ensure it was in order.

This is the 6:04 KASU newscast for Tuesday, September 19th.  Here are the stories reported this morning:

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — An Arkansas trial has been delayed for a Tennessee rapper and his bodyguard, who face federal weapons charges

The scheduled Monday trial of Ricky Hampton, who performs as Finese2Tymes, and bodyguard Kentrell Gwynn, both of Memphis, was postponed on Friday until March 19.

Hampton is charged with being a felon in possession of a firearm in connection with a shooting outside a nightclub in eastern Arkansas and Gwynn is charged with providing a felon with a firearm and with providing armed security to a felon.

Both have pleaded not guilty.

This is the 6:04 KASU newscast for Monday, September 18th.  Here are the stories reported this morning:

Arkansas State University

The Arkansas State University Board of Trustees are meeting today at the Cooper Alumni Center on the Jonesboro campus.  Here is a video of the meeting:

NPR

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — A government agency survey says the percentage of Arkansas residents with health care insurance is on the rise, putting the state above the national average.

The number of uninsured residents dropped last year by almost 46,000 to nearly 231,800, according to the survey conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau.

JONESBORO, Ark. (AP) — The board of trustees for Arkansas State University is considering plans to build facilities in Imboden and Walnut Ridge for use in a disaster preparedness training program.

The board meets Friday and will consider long-term lease agreements between the university and the two cities. The Jonesboro Sun reports that the proposed facilities would allow university students and local emergency personnel to practice simulations of emergency situations.

This is the 6:04 KASU newscast for Friday, September 15th.  Here are the stories reported this morning:

Delta Regional Authority

This is a press release from the Delta Regional Authority:  

President Donald J. Trump has announced his intent to nominate Christopher Caldwell of Little Rock, Arkansas, to be Federal Co-Chairman of the Delta Regional Authority (DRA), pending approval by the U.S. Senate. The nomination follows the August 10th appointment of Federal Alternate Co-Chairman Peter D. Kinder of Missouri.

Arkansas Licensed Lay Midwives are regulated by the Arkansas Department of Health. Current rules require mothers to prove they are medically fit to endure a midwife-assisted birth by undergoing two medical assessments with a qualified medical provider or public health clinician. Midwives must relinquish care of any client found to be at risk, or risk losing their license.

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