KASU

Arkansas

Protests over construction of the Dakota Access Oil Pipeline near the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota has triggered sympathy demonstrations across the nation, including in Arkansas. But Arkansas activists are also protesting a newly permitted 440-mile long underground oil transport project called the Diamond Pipeline.

The ever-increasing Republican majority in Arkansas has a shot a passing some legislation that a toehold of Democrats managed to hold-off, or at least mitigate on occasion in the last session.

Brandon Tabor, KASU News

There are many stories in the history books about African-Americans in Civil Rights Activism.  Here in Arkansas, most people remember the story of 9 Black students who were integrated into Central High School in Little Rock or Daisy Bates. 

However, African Americans in Arkansas made more contributions to civil rights than what was recorded in the history books.  The Arkansas Humanities Council wants the public to hear the stories of civil rights activism in the state. 

Arkansas voters approved medical marijuana earlier this month and the governor says he’s open to seeing if the voter-approved tax structure should be changed in January’s legislative session. Speaking to reporters at the state Capitol on Monday, Governor Asa Hutchinson said he hasn’t yet made up his mind on new taxes or shifting where marijuana revenue should go.

Governor Asa Hutchinson is continuing his push to find so-called efficiencies in state government with a pair of re-organizing proposals for the legislative session beginning in January. At a press conference on Monday, the Republican governor announced he wants to move the Office of Energy from the state Economic Development Commission to the Department of Environmental Quality and to reduce the number of Criminal Detention Facilities Review Committees from 28 to eight.

Hutchinson said moving the Office of Energy out of AEDC is a move for “mission alignment.”

Kimberly O’Guinn has been appointed by the governor to one of three slots on the Arkansas Public Service Commission. The body regulates Arkansas utilities such as natural gas, electricity, water, and pipelines. Commissioners serve six-year terms.

Little Rock director Jeff Nichols’ movie Loving, about the Supreme Court case that extirpated anti-miscegenation laws in 1967, opens nationwide today. But what does that mean for folks in Arkansas City, where the nearest movie theater is the Hollywood in Monticello, about 50 miles away, where it's not playing anyway?

Representatives of the U.S. State Department met with more than two dozen teachers and nonprofit leaders inside the Ron Robinson Theater today to share work and celebrate the close of the first-in-the-nation Declaration of Learning pilot program in schools throughout Arkansas.

It was, in some ways, the culmination of an agenda set forth by then Secretary of State Hillary Clinton in the waning days of her tenure.

pixabay.com

Arkansas is one of 37 states that is encouraging more girls and women to enter into STEM careers.  

STEM stands for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math.  Careers that fall into these categories are traditionally male-dominated.  A national push is underway to change that trend, and get more women involved.  The national effort is called Million Women Mentors. 

White Christian Nationalist organizers, including two groups operating in Arkansas, are lauding the election of Donald Trump to the U.S. presidency.

After the election, Thomas Robb, founder and national director of the Knights Party, a faction of the Ku Klux Klan based in Boone County, issued a press release declaring that the white voting majority has finally spoken.

“I have been saying for a long time there’s been an anger among white middle class working class America,” Robb says, “who’ve been betrayed by the political establishment.”

Arkansas State University

Encouraging young girls and women to pursue education and careers in the STEM disciplines is the goal of a new national movement in which Arkansas State University is taking a lead role.

Million Women Mentors (MWM) is being promoted in Arkansas by Walmart, STEMconnector® and Lt. Gov. Tim Griffin, who will be keynote speaker for the campus launch of the program Tuesday, Nov. 15.  MWM wants to engage a million mentors by the year 2019.

At 8 years old, Jeremiah Adams is starting to read for the first time. He was delayed several years in public school because of his slow reading, but his family says this new private school is changing him. He notices his surroundings in new ways, approaches learning differently, even insists on going to school.

As we get closer to the holiday season, Travel Writer Kim Williams has the scoop on some fun events that you will want to sink your teeth into them.

Williams takes you to a city in Northwest Arkansas where they are hosting a special wine and dinner event.  You can also participate in cooking classes  and experience exquisite tastes.

After dinner, you must eat desert.  Williams knows of another event in the central part of the state in the mountains where you can partake of delicious treats of the holidays.

Brandon Tabor, KASU News

What do California, Nevada, Arizona, Massachusetts, Maine, Florida, North Dakota, and Montana have in common with Arkansas this election season?  In those states, voters will decide on issues revolving around marijuana.  Voters in Arkansas, Florida, North Dakota, and Montana will specifically decide on the medicinal uses for the cannabis plant. 

Brandon Tabor, KASU News

This is part 2 of a series of reports entitled "What's the Issue?"  I spoke with Craighead County Clerk Kade Holliday about the issues that are on the November ballot.  We are talking about what each issue on the ballot is and what a "for" or "against" vote means.  Issue number 3 is titled "An Amendment to the Arkansas Constitution Concerning Job Creation, Job Expansion, and Economic Development" and Holliday says that this issue is a little complex.

Brandon Tabor, KASU News

Many would agree that this has been a very contentious election year as voters prepare to select the next leaders of our municipal, state, and national governments.  However, after voting on your preferred candidate you're then face with a list of amendments and acts on your ballot--asking if you are "for" or "against."  Do you know about the issues on the ballot and what what they mean?  

Pixabay

Gov. Asa Hutchinson said he will commit $10 million in additional funding for higher education in fiscal year 2019 – the first across-the-board funding increase for the state’s colleges and universities since 1996 and the first increase of any kind in six years.

governor.arkansas.gov

This is a statement that Arkansas Governor Asa Hutchinson released as part of his weekly column:  

Imagine my surprise when I heard the news about issue seven only minutes after going to the polls myself for early voting. I just cast my vote in Rogers when I found out the Arkansas Supreme Court had disqualified one of the marijuana measures.

Brandon Tabor, KASU News

The Arkansas Supreme Court in a 5-2 opinion has disqualified the Arkansas Medical Cannabis Act – Issue 7 – from the November ballot, with the majority opinion saying the act sponsors “failed to meet the constitutional requirements” related to the signature gathering process.

Brandon Tabor, KASU News

GOP Presidential nominee Donald Trump hasn’t seen his poll numbers slide any in the last month, despite controversies and lackluster debate performances. As a matter of fact, the Republican standard-bearer slightly grew his lead over Democrat Hillary Clinton in the former First Lady of Arkansas’ one-time home state.

In the U.S. Senate race, the contest has tightened between incumbent Republican Sen. John Boozman and Democratic challenger Conner Eldridge, but Boozman still maintains a comfortable 18-point lead.

A new Talk Business & Politics-Hendrix College survey shows that opposition remains stronger than support for two medical marijuana proposals that will be on the November ballot.

The poll, conducted statewide among 463 likely Arkansas voters on October 21, 2016, has a margin of error of 4.6%.

Arkansas’s unemployment rate is up, though not by very much. The state also still rests below the national average in the September report from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

After three months of flat unemployment numbers Arkansas’s rate ticked up from 3.9 percent in August to 4 percent in September. 

Johnelle Shaw is a 27-year-old first-time mother with a two-month old son, Logan. She is visiting a lactation consultant at The Pulaski County Health Unit in Southwest Little Rock. Logan has a cold and is back for a breastfeeding check-in.  The consultant weighs him in at 7.6 ounces, a full pound bigger than he was at his last visit a month before.

Marvell-Elaine schools bus driver Larry Greer’s route twists through the Arkansas Delta, between the White and Mississippi Rivers. “All together I go from Elaine to Snow Lake, 65 miles round trip,” he said, while elementary school kids filed onto his bus for the afternoon ride home.

These are country bus stops along country roads. The way is long. In the morning, Greer says, he will wait only so long at an empty stop before he snaps his levered doors closed again. “If they don’t come out, they’re not going that day.”

You can look at your November ballot before you go to the polls.  Craighead County Clerk Kade Holliday says the Arkansas Secretary of State’s office has established a website that allows you to view your ballot, as well as change any voter registration information.  Holliday says this site is not new to the state, but it is new to Craighead County.

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