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Morning Edition

Weekdays 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m.

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosted by Steve Inskeep, David Greene, Rachel Martin,  and Noel King, Morning Edition takes listeners around the country and the world with multi-faceted stories and commentaries every weekday.

For over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has prepared listeners for the day ahead with up-to-the-minute news, background analysis and commentary. Regularly heard on Morning Edition are familiar voices, including commentators Cokie Roberts and Frank Deford, as well as the special series StoryCorps, the largest oral history project in American history.

Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors -- including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award. 

Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. Morning Edition, it's a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

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A Flock Of Seagulls And Pepperoni

Apr 4, 2018

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Why do good employees sometimes go on to be bad bosses? Kelly Shue, a professor of finance at Yale University, says it may have to do with what's known as the 'Peter Principle.'

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Type your name into Google...

(SOUNDBITE OF TYPING)

Farmers around Arkansas are feeling optimistic about the chances of corn producing a healthy harvest this year.  Nationally, corn hit a record yield in 2017 and prices averaged $3.50 per bushel, making corn among the best paid of the major row crops.

Arkansas may not be part of the traditional corn belt of the U.S. but still makes a great place to grow corn, according to Bono farmer Tyler Nutt.  He said much of corn’s success is due to Arkansas’s status as the second most poultry-producing state with almost unlimited demand for corn to feed chickens.

“You put a pencil to it, and whatever pays out better, that’s typically the crop you plant,” Nutt said.

He said corn is also good for the soil, and needs far less water than rice.

Arkansas farmers who grew cotton in 2017 will be getting rebate checks this spring from a boll weevil eradication program that’s been considered a success.  The rebate is 75 cents per cotton acre.

Regina Coleman, Arkansas Boll Weevil Eradication Foundation’s executive director, said the rebate is possible because the foundation was able to pay off a federal loan for the program early and currently holds a cash reserve. 

Farmers paid into the program at a rate of three dollars per acre last year.  The 2017 assessment was lower than a previous rate of four dollars per acre.

State and local leaders are considering how best to treat Arkansas’s opioid crisis if their coalition lawsuit succeeds against opioid drug makers and distributors.

A group of Arkansas cities and counties made national headlines when it came together last week to launch a lawsuit against 65 opioid drug makers, distributors, and others.

Colin Jorgensen is an attorney for the Arkansas Association of Counties who worked on the lawsuit. He says the case seeks a payout large enough to fix the state’s growing opioid epidemic.

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Last night, the Irish kept fighting. It was the Women's National Basketball title game, and it came down to one final shot. Here's ESPN's Adam Amin on the call.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

ADAM AMIN: Ogunbowale for the win.

Ethiopia Bans All Foreign Adoptions

Apr 2, 2018

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