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Morning Edition

Weekdays 5:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m.

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosted by Steve Inskeep, David Greene and Rachel Martin, Morning Edition takes listeners around the country and the world with multi-faceted stories and commentaries every weekday.

For over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has prepared listeners for the day ahead with up-to-the-minute news, background analysis and commentary. Regularly heard on Morning Edition are familiar voices, including commentators Cokie Roberts and Frank Deford, as well as the special series StoryCorps, the largest oral history project in American history.

Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors -- including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award. 

Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. Morning Edition, it's a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne with congratulations to R.J. Balson and Son. The butcher shop on the south coast of England has been named Britain's oldest family-run business, and is it ever. Balson's began selling sausages and bacon in 1535 when Henry VIII was king and still married to Ann Boleyn. Twenty-five generations later, owner Richard Balson tells the Daily Mail his son will join the business next year, and that son has a son, too. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Pakistan has opened the door to billions of dollars worth of new trade with India. The decision might help reduce political and military tensions between the two rival nations.

Afghan Security Under Fire As Troops Leave

Nov 4, 2011

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Last weekend brought the deadliest attack yet on NATO forces in Kabul, one of a series of attacks bold enough to make headlines, beginning with the 20-hour siege of the American embassy. Those attacks over several weeks raised new concerns about security in Afghanistan's capital. One militant group in particular, the Haqqani Network, is thought to have orchestrated the most spectacular attacks. Seth Jones is the author of "In the Graveyard of Empires." Good morning.

SETH JONES: Good morning, Renee.

Remembering even the smallest details of her life can be hard for Gweneviere Mann. She has suffered from short-term memory loss since 2008, caused by complications from an operation. But that's not enough to stop Mann and her boyfriend, Yasir Salem, from running a marathon — with a unique strategy.

Recently, Mann, 41, sat down with Salem, 34, to talk about her daily life.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Nailah Lymus is a 27-year-old aspiring designer who had her first runway show during New York's Fashion Week in September, and she has just had another one.

Lymus began designing jewelry when she was 7, and now has a line of clothing called Amirah Creations. She is a devout Muslim, but her dresses will surprise you.

Students are borrowing more money to pay for college than ever before. New data shows that students who graduated in 2010 carried 5 percent more debt than in the previous year. And education debt is expect to grow in the coming years, as students struggle to pay higher tuition costs.

Police are on the hunt for the bandits who robbed a Union Pacific Railroad car after it made an emergency stop in Victorville, Calif. They made off with 20 boxes. Police told the Victorville Daily Press that the robbers couldn't have known what was in the car; they made off with $200 worth of pigs feet.

The pro basketball season still hasn't started, but Kevin Durant got a workout. The Oklahoma City star drove across the state to a flag football game. On Twitter the other night, he wrote, "This lockout is really boring. Anybody playing flag football?" An Oklahoma State student invited Durant to join a game his team had planned.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep with tales of British alcohol. The one stop shop in Essex refused to sell whiskey to Diane Taylor. She didn't have proper I.D., and the shop said rules are rules, even though she is 92. Ms. Taylor at least caused less trouble than the ghost supposedly inhabiting a pub in Birmingham, England. At Halloween, the ghost has smashed bottles of wine it didn't like. It's not clear why the staff thinks it's a ghost and not a customer. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Much of Mindy Kaling's humor is rooted in something that might seem unfeasible: using logic to explore American culture. But it works — and works well — because Kaling uses a type of circular logic that's all her own. Just consider this recent Tweet: "Can everyone buy my book please? I wanna quit the business and homeschool my kids real weird."

MF Global Files For Bankruptcy

Oct 31, 2011

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with bad bets and a big bankruptcy.

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Is Europe's Bailout 'A Gigantic Con Game'?

Oct 31, 2011

Italy needs the backing of Europe's bailout fund. But Italy's a huge economy — much, much bigger than Greece, Portugal, and Ireland combined. And the Europeans don't want to put enough money into their bailout fund to back Italy.

So they're getting creative.

The rest of Europe is likely offer investors insurance that will pay back the first 20 percent of any losses on new Italian bonds.

The New EU Rescue Fund: Where Will Money Come From?

Oct 31, 2011

A $1.4 trillion rescue fund is a central part of the deal reached by European leaders to stave off financial catastrophe on the continent. But there are many big question marks about the fund.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

A baseball fan named David Huyette used a word you don't hear so much. The word was honorable. Mr. Huyette ended up holding the homerun ball that won Game 6 of the World Series for the St. Louis Cardinals. It could've been worth thousands, but Mr. Huyette returned the historic ball. He said it was the honorable thing to do. And he was rewarded with another baseball, an autographed bat and tickets to Game 7 of the World Series. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

'Rock Center': Serving Hard News, But Will It Sell?

Oct 31, 2011

At 10 p.m. on Monday, NBC anchor Brian Williams will do something that hasn't been done in nearly 20 years: launch a new network TV newsmagazine.

Hosted live from NBC's Rockefeller Center headquarters — thus the name, Rock Center — it's an ambitious attempt to showcase both Williams' serious news skills and his signature dry wit. And if it's going to succeed, he and NBC may have to reinvent the newsmagazine for a new age.

Giant Lego Man Washes Up On Florida Beach

Oct 28, 2011

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A Romance Sparked By Pepper Spray

Oct 28, 2011

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ARI SHAPIRO, host: Good morning, I'm Ari Shapiro. She was an Occupy Wall Streeter in tears from pepper spray. He was a volunteer medic who rushed to her side. Their eyes met, and the energy between them felt like a show of excessive force. The cooing new couple told the New York Daily News, nothing strengthens a relationship like a chemical agent. The police officer who fired the pepper spray was stripped of ten days vacation. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

"What if" — two words that ignite the plot of Roland Emmerich's new movie Anonymous, which conjures up an Elizabethan England rife with dark motivations, political maneuverings and bold conspiracy, and dares to imagine a different identity for the world's most celebrated playwright. John Orloff wrote the screenplay for the movie, which starts with the premise that Shakespeare didn't write Shakespeare.

On Halloween 70 years ago, an iconic American monument was completed — Mount Rushmore. It took 14 years of blasting and chiseling granite to finish the work. And chief stone carver Luigi Del Bianco, an Italian immigrant, was there for most of them. Del Bianco was responsible for many of the finer details in Lincoln's face.

Del Bianco's daughter Gloria and her nephew, Lou, recently sat down at StoryCorps to share their memories of him and the work he did. The Mount Rushmore project began in 1927, when Del Bianco was 35. And it ended 14 years later.

Economy Shows Modest Growth

Oct 27, 2011

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with the economy still treading water.

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