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Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosted by Steve Inskeep, David Greene and Rachel Martin, Morning Edition takes listeners around the country and the world with multi-faceted stories and commentaries every weekday.

For over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has prepared listeners for the day ahead with up-to-the-minute news, background analysis and commentary. Regularly heard on Morning Edition are familiar voices, including commentators Cokie Roberts and Frank Deford, as well as the special series StoryCorps, the largest oral history project in American history.

Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors -- including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award. 

Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. Morning Edition, it's a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

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How Fast Can You Read This Headline?

Jul 7, 2017

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Five Mualimm-ak remembers the first time he saw his son Omar, and all the preparation he did for that moment.

"I went to classes. I had like 50 books, so that I could help deliver you," Five tells Omar. "I wanted to make sure I was the first person to touch you."

The night Omar was born, Five says he fell asleep in the hospital holding him.

"I think it was the most joyous time in my life," he says.

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President Trump is on his way to Germany. Earlier this morning, he was in Poland, where he stood beside Poland's president, Andrzej Duda. And he promised to confront the threat from North Korea, quote, "very strongly."

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Good morning, I'm Mary Louise Kelly. And never let it be said that Aurora, Ill., doesn't throw good party. They celebrated the 25th anniversary of "Wayne's World" by breaking the Guinness World Record for head-banging.

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President Trump is praising Poland as a staunch U.S. ally.

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Two weeks ago, in a remarkable move, the State Plant Board of Arkansas voted to ban the sale and use of a weedkiller called dicamba. It took that action after a wave of complaints about dicamba drifting into neighboring fields and damaging other crops, especially soybeans.

That ban is still waiting to go into force. It requires approval from a committee of the state legislature, which will meet on Friday.

When Kelly Barrales-Saylor was a new mom, she got a lot of children's books as gifts. Most were simple books about shapes, colors and letters. There were none about science — or math.

"My editorial brain lit up and said there must be a need for this," says Barrales-Saylor, who works as an editor for a publishing company outside Chicago.

Halfway across the world, Chris Ferrie was similarly unsatisfied.

When reading to his kids, Ferrie noticed that most books used animals to introduce new words. In today's world, that just didn't make sense to him.

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The state of Arkansas today begins accepting applications for marijuana licenses, both to grow it and sell it commercially. It becomes the first so-called Bible Belt to do so, and the 29th state nationally to have a state-regulated marijuana cultivation and retail industry.

Of course, it’s still a  Schedule I narcotic under the Controlled Substances Act and illegal under federal law.

On the eve of this Independence Day weekend, Arkansas Public Media offers you this interview of John Hudak, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and the author of Marijuana: A Short History, by managing editor Bobby Ampezzan. 

Arkansas university and college administrators and faculty have been busy this summer drafting new policies to accommodate a new state law allowing concealed weapons on campuses this coming school year. Northwest Arkansas Community College in Bentonville, with an enrollment of 12,000 last semester, formed a special task force in April to consider the change. 

Teresa Taylor is the interim executive director of Institutional Policy, Risk Management and Compliance for the college.

“We held very open public town hall meeting forums to explain the laws that exist already, and what that means for our campus,” she says.

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In China, a futuristic new kind of urban transport that was intended to beat traffic jams appears now to have gone off the rails. NPR's Anthony Kuhn has the story from Beijing.

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Two things we know - interest rates are low; consumer confidence is high, which means the housing market should be hot. But it is not. It's just OK.

NPR's Chris Arnold has been asking, why?

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