All Things Considered

Weekdays 3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. and weekends 4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m
Melissa Block, Michele Norris & Robert Siegal

Since its debut in 1971, this afternoon radio newsmagazine has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Heard by more than 13 million* people on over 600 radio stations each week, All Things Considered is one of the most popular programs in America. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block, Michele Norris, and Robert Siegel present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. Guy Raz hosts a one-hour edition of the program on Saturday and Sunday.

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Latin America
2:00 pm
Sun November 6, 2011

In Nicaragua, Ortega Poised For Re-Election

Originally published on Sun November 6, 2011 5:59 pm

Transcript

LAURA SULLIVAN, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Laura Sullivan.

It's Election Day in Nicaragua where President Daniel Ortega is running for an unprecedented third term. The country's constitution sets a two-term limit, but the Supreme Court declared that unconstitutional. The longtime Sandinistan leader has been leading in the polls. NPR's Jason Beaubien reports from Managua.

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Latin America
2:00 pm
Sun November 6, 2011

Nicaragua, Guatemala: '80s Rebels Seek Leadership

Originally published on Sun November 6, 2011 5:59 pm

Transcript

LAURA SULLIVAN, HOST:

Nicaragua isn't the only country in Central America holding elections today. In Guatemala, people are also headed to the polls to choose a new president. And in both countries, the elections are fraught with history.

Back in the 1980s, Guatemala and Nicaragua were facing civil war and revolution. Twenty-five years later, both countries are still embattled but with different issues.

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Interviews
2:00 pm
Sun November 6, 2011

What Do Occupy Wall Street Protesters Want?

Originally published on Sun November 6, 2011 5:59 pm

Transcript

LAURA SULLIVAN, HOST:

Occupy Wall Street is in its second month of protest, and the frustration with financial big wigs continues to grow. Tomorrow's protesters will track 11 miles from Upper Manhattan to Lower Manhattan, ending in Zuccotti Park, the place where it all started seven weeks ago. They're calling the walk End to End for 99%.

These events are becoming a familiar sight to bankers looking down from their high-rise windows onto the tent city below. But what's Wall Street really thinking about the so-called 99 percent just outside their offices?

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Music
3:48 pm
Sat November 5, 2011

From Samba To Flamenco, A Latin Grammy Preview

The Los Angeles band La Santa Cecilia is nominated in the Best Tropical Song category at this year's Latin Grammys.
Rene Miranda Courtesy of the artist

The 2011 Latin Grammy Awards will take place this Thursday in Las Vegas. For those unfamiliar with the categories and nominees, Betto Arcos of KPFK's Global Village returns to weekends on All Things Considered to play songs from a few of his favorite nominated performers. Included are a samba artist best known for his film role as a singing sailor, the reigning king of flamenco, one of Mexico's biggest bands and an L.A. ensemble that channels the various sounds of its city.

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Author Interviews
2:29 pm
Sat November 5, 2011

A Tale Of Forgiveness From The Tragedy Of Masada

Alice Hoffman is the author of more than 30 books.
Deborah Feingold alicehoffman.com

Originally published on Sat November 5, 2011 5:33 pm

When Jerusalem fell in 70 AD, hundreds of Jews journeyed through the desert and settled in the haven of Masada. In what is now southern Israel, Masada was an old fortress of King Herod's that sits atop an enormous rock plateau surrounded by steep cliffs.

"When I was there, I felt so moved and so connected," author Alice Hoffman tells Laura Sullivan, guest host of weekends on All Things Considered.

Hoffman was so struck by the beauty of Masada's rocky terrain, she says, that she chose to make it the backdrop in her new novel, The Dovekeepers.

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Art & Design
1:54 pm
Sat November 5, 2011

The Red Solo Cup: Every Party's Most Popular Guest

In 2009, the red Solo cup got extra grips and a square bottom.
Courtesy of Solo Cup Co.

Originally published on Sat November 5, 2011 5:44 pm

On most Saturday nights in college towns across the country, students get ready to party. The one thing all those parties will likely have in common — besides the keg, of course — is a stack of red plastic cups.

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Europe
6:03 pm
Fri November 4, 2011

Greek Prime Minister Survives Confidence Vote

Greek Prime Minister George Papandreou survived a confidence vote in parliament. For more, Guy Raz talks to NPR's Sylvia Poggioli, who is in Athens.

Presidential Race
3:30 pm
Fri November 4, 2011

Lawyer For Cain Accuser Issues Statement

The lawyer for one of the women who have received settlements after filing sexual harassment complaints against GOP presidential candidate Herman Cain released a public statement. It rebuts Cain's statements that the claim was baseless. Robert Siegel talks to NPR's Tamara Keith for more.

The Picture Show
2:06 pm
Fri November 4, 2011

At 75, 'Life' Revisits Its First Cover Story

Alfred Eisenstaedt Life

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 10:17 am

Seventy-five years ago this month, Henry Luce, who had launched Time magazine in the 1920s, created his third great magazine: Life. Over the coming years it would come to be known as the weekly with the most and the best photographs. It would show Americans what war and peace looked like. There were photographs in Life of the Spanish Civil War and of V-J Day in Times Square that are rare cases for which the term "iconic" truly makes sense. And there were dozens of others, too.

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Books
2:07 pm
Thu November 3, 2011

'The Art Museum': A Case For The Printed Book?

If The Art Museum were a real museum and not just a book, there would hardly be need for another. At 18 pounds and 922 pages, the expansive book is organized into thematic "galleries," and within those "rooms" dedicated to solo artists, like Picasso.
Phaidon

Originally published on Mon December 5, 2011 2:01 pm

Publisher Phaidon's latest art endeavor, The Art Museum, presents the collection of an imaginary museum with the greatest works from art collections around the globe. That museum would have to be imaginary — the book itself weighs in at 18 pounds, measures 16 1/2 by 12 5/8 inches and runs nearly 1,000 pages.

The Art Museum is divided into 25 galleries, as opposed to chapters, and each gallery is divided into several rooms, which all told include reproductions of more than 2,700 works.

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NPR Story
2:00 pm
Thu November 3, 2011

Greek Drama Dominates Talks At G-20 Summit

President Obama speaks with (from left) French President Nicolas Sarkozy, German Chancellor Angela Merkel and British Prime Minister David Cameron at the G-20 summit in Cannes, France, on Thursday. The talks were dominated by Greece's financial woes.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Thu November 3, 2011 6:37 pm

Greece's decision to scrap a referendum on new austerity measures added a note of urgency to the G-20 summit meeting that began in Cannes, France, on Thursday. President Obama and other G-20 leaders are trying to prevent the Greek debt crisis from spreading to the rest of Europe and beyond.

Before the G-20 summit formally got under way, Obama met privately with the leaders of France and Germany — Europe's two biggest economies. They're also the architects of a continental debt rescue plan.

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World
2:00 pm
Thu November 3, 2011

Papandreou Nixes Referendum On Bailout

The Greek government is teetering on the brink of collapse Thursday, following the decision of Prime Minister George Papandreou to call off a referendum on the Europe bailout package for his country. The finance minister and other party colleagues have turned against Papandreou, amid talk of a national coalition government to prepare for new elections. Guy Raz talks to Joanna Kakissis, who has the latest from Athens.

Business
2:00 pm
Thu November 3, 2011

Filene's Basement To Close Its Doors

Filene's Basement, the storied discount store, has filed for bankruptcy and plans to close down all its locations by the new year. Its parent company, Syms Corp., has also filed for Chapter 11.

Europe
2:00 pm
Thu November 3, 2011

Why Put The Bailout To A Referendum In Greece?

Robert Siegel speaks to Mark Mazower, a professor of history at Columbia University and an expert on contemporary Greece, about the tensions between democracy and the need for decisive action in dealing with the euro crisis. Mazower says that the speed of financial markets, and the slowness of the democratic process, has increased this tension during the crisis.

Deceptive Cadence
1:52 pm
Thu November 3, 2011

Hey, Kids, It's Vinny Pookh Time! Cartoon Music From The USSR

1969's Vinny Pookh V Gosti ("Winnie The Pooh Goes Visiting"), with music by Mieczysław Weinberg.
YouTube

Twentieth-century Russian music is often thought of as dark and brooding, a reflection of life under the thumb of a brutal state. When it was funny, it usually had a kind of gallows humor.

Yet many of the same composers whose concert works often reflected a dark reality also wrote cartoon music for kids. Thursday night, the Brooklyn Philharmonic is playing some of these cartoon scores in Brighton Beach — the heart of the Russian-American community in New York City. For some of its creators, cartoon music offered a certain kind of escape.

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Author Interviews
5:02 pm
Wed November 2, 2011

Punk Rock Grows Up, And Grays, In 'Other F Word'

Punk rockers like Lars Frederiksen of Rancid, shown with his son, struggle to reconcile their rebellious identities with their roles as devoted dads.
Oscilloscope Laboratories

Originally published on Wed November 2, 2011 5:40 pm

Punk rock bands like Blink-182 and Rancid are no strangers to obscenity — it's an integral part of their anti-establishment vernacular. But as the figureheads of raucous teenage rebellion age, they've had to encounter a different kind of "F-word"-- fatherhood. A new documentary film explores this paradox, as serious punk-rock performers make the transition from rebels to responsible family men.

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NPR Story
2:00 pm
Wed November 2, 2011

A Look At Papandreou's Motives

When Greek Prime Minister George Papandreou decided to put the eurozone debt deal to a referendum, he stunned the continent. Why he did it is still unknown. To try and gain some insight into the prime minister's motives, Guy Raz talks with Nick Malkoutzis, deputy editor of Greek daily Kathimerini.

'Darkhorse' Battalion And The Afghan War
2:00 pm
Wed November 2, 2011

Strategy Behind A Marine Unit's Dangerous Mission

The Marines of Darkhorse Battalion suffered a high rate of casualties during their seven-month deployment to southern Afghanistan. Their mission was to go after the Taliban in a place called Sangin — a crossroads of insurgency and drug trafficking. At the time, officials in the military and all the way up to the secretary of defense asked why the Darkhorse Battalion was taking so many casualties. NPR Pentagon correspondent Tom Bowman is reporting all week on the battalion.

National Security
2:00 pm
Tue November 1, 2011

Senators Grill Officials On ATF Operations

Senators grill a high-level Justice Department official about why they didn't do or say more about two Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosive gun trafficking operations that resulted in hundreds of guns going missing in Mexico.

Your Money
2:00 pm
Tue November 1, 2011

BofA Cancels Plans For Debit Card Fee

Bank of America canceled plans to impose a $5 monthly fee on customers who use debit cards in stores and restaurants. The bank's original decision to charge the fee came under sharp attack from consumer groups and individual customers.

NPR Story
2:00 pm
Tue November 1, 2011

Book Review: 'Mrs. Nixon'

11/22/63 is the latest book from author Stephen King.

NPR Story
2:00 pm
Tue November 1, 2011

Rick Perry Video Gomes Viral

Video of a speech Texas Gov. and GOP presidential candidate Rick Perry delivered in New Hampshire last week has gone viral.

NPR Story
2:00 pm
Tue November 1, 2011

Investigators Scour Books Of MF Global

Originally published on Tue November 1, 2011 4:40 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

GUY RAZ, HOST:

And I'm Guy Raz. Investigators are poring over the books of MF Global today. They're trying to figure out what happened to several hundred million dollars. The investment firm, run by former New Jersey Governor Jon Corzine, filed for bankruptcy yesterday. It failed in large part because it made ill-timed multibillion dollar bets on European debt. NPR's Yuki Noguchi reports on where all that missing money could have gone.

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World
2:00 pm
Tue November 1, 2011

E.U. Leaders Frustrated By Greek Referendum

Markets slumped from Asia to Europe to the U.S. on word that the Greek prime minister will put the European Union rescue package to a referendum. What now? Guy Raz speaks with NPR's Eric Westervelt for more.

Television
2:00 pm
Tue November 1, 2011

Kardashians Made Bank From Wedding

Guy Raz speaks with Leslie Bruce, senior writer the Hollywood Reporter, about the money behind reality star Kim Kardashian's wedding to basketball player Kris Humphries. The reportedly multimillion dollar wedding actually earned the Kardashian family money through various deals with entertainment television and magazines. But Kardashian filed for divorce Monday after 72 days of marriage.

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