All Things Considered

Weekdays 3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. and weekends 4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m
Melissa Block, Michele Norris & Robert Siegal

Since its debut in 1971, this afternoon radio newsmagazine has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Heard by more than 13 million* people on over 600 radio stations each week, All Things Considered is one of the most popular programs in America. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block, Michele Norris, and Robert Siegel present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. Guy Raz hosts a one-hour edition of the program on Saturday and Sunday.

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Music Interviews
12:19 pm
Sat November 19, 2011

We Are Augustines: Old Wounds Inspire Recovery Songs

We Are Augustines' debut album is Rise Ye Sunken Ships. Left to right: Eric Sanderson, Rob Allen, Billy McCarthy.
Arwen Hunt Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue September 4, 2012 3:32 pm

Billy McCarthy lost his mother to suicide when he was a teenager. He cared for his schizophrenic brother as best he could after that, but his brother landed in solitary confinement in prison, where he eventually took his own life, too. Somehow, McCarthy found a way to rise above his anguish — as a songwriter. He began playing music while living in foster care in California.

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Author Interviews
12:01 pm
Sat November 19, 2011

Kurt Vonnegut Was Not A Happy Man. 'So It Goes.'

Author Kurt Vonnegut, shown in 1979 in New York City, died in 2007 at age 84.
Marty Reichenthal AP

Kurt Vonnegut was a counterculture hero, an American Mark Twain, an avuncular, jocular friend to the youth — until you got to know him.

"Kurt was actually rather flinty, rather irascible. He had something of a temper," author Charles Shields tells weekends on All Things Considered host Laura Sullivan. Shields is the author of a new biography of Vonnegut, called And So It Goes: Kurt Vonnegut: A Life.

"But as I also point out in the book," Shields adds, "he was a damaged person."

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Music Interviews
4:41 pm
Fri November 18, 2011

A.A. Bondy: Making His Own World

A.A. Bondy performs at The Waiting Room in Omaha, Neb. He says it took him eight days to write his new album, Believers.
Hilary Stohs-Krause

One Friday night at The Waiting Room in Omaha, Neb., more than 150 people are milling around waiting for A.A. Bondy to take the stage. His new album, Believers, came out two months ago and caught fans like Andre Steinbergs by surprise.

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Asia
2:46 pm
Fri November 18, 2011

Myanmar's Ghost Capital Rises From The Jungle

People offer prayers at the newly completed Uppatasaniti Pagoda in Naypiydaw earlier this year. It's unclear when construction on the new capital began or how much it has cost this impoverished nation where round-the-clock power is a rarity.
Soe Than Win AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue February 28, 2012 11:31 am

The government of Myanmar bars or severely restricts reporting by foreign correspondents. NPR is withholding the name of the veteran journalist who recently entered the country and filed this story, in order to protect his identity and his ability to return in the future.

The newest — and nicest — road in Myanmar is, paradoxically, one of the emptiest as well: Only a handful of cars travel along the desolate four-lane highway to nowhere, or so it seems.

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NPR Story
2:00 pm
Fri November 18, 2011

'Managed' Apple Creates A Buzz

Melissa Block talks with John Seabrook, staff writer at The New Yorker. His latest article, "Crunch," delves into the world of the SweeTango — a new hybrid apple that is part Honeycrisp, part Zestar. It's sweet and tangy. There's a hint of cinnamon, a hint of pineapple and a whole lot of crunch.

NPR Story
2:00 pm
Fri November 18, 2011

Army Successfully Tests Hypersonic Missile

Originally published on Fri November 18, 2011 7:02 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

Imagine flying from L.A. to New York in about 30 minutes. That's roughly eight times the speed of sound. And yesterday, the U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command managed to launch a missile that flew at that speed. The test missile was sent from Hawaii to hit a site on the Kwajalein Atoll in the South Pacific about 2,400 miles away, and within a half hour, the missile struck its target. And the military is hoping to speed it up even more.

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NPR Story
2:00 pm
Fri November 18, 2011

Analysts: Fate Of Egyptian Revolution At Stake

Originally published on Fri November 18, 2011 7:02 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

In Egypt today, a rare move. Islamists and secular activists joined forces in several cities for a protest. They want to pressure their military rulers to cede control to an elected civilian government. The protest was sparked by a document floated by the interim government. It would give the Egyptian armed forces unchecked power.

NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson went back to Cairo's now famous Tahrir Square and found tens of thousands of demonstrators.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHANTING CROWD)

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NPR Story
2:00 pm
Fri November 18, 2011

Future Of Ministry Uncertain After Cathedral's Sale

The Crystal Cathedral in Garden Grove, Calif., known for its Hour of Power broadcasts, is being sold to the Roman Catholic Diocese of Orange.
Jae C. Hong AP

Originally published on Fri November 18, 2011 7:02 pm

The Roman Catholic Church is about to buy a beacon of Protestant televangelism.

The Crystal Cathedral, a temple of glass in Garden Grove, Calif., will be sold to the Catholic Church for $57 million — a decision that left some congregants furious and their future up in the air.

When the Crystal Cathedral declared bankruptcy last year, it soon became clear that the legendary building would have to be sold. There were several offers, but in the end, the church's board favored the Catholic diocese in Orange County.

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Digital Life
2:00 pm
Fri November 18, 2011

Cow Clicker Founder: If You Can't Ruin It, Destroy It

Zynga, the company behind popular Facebook games such as Farmville and Cityville, is expected to have its initial public offering before the end of the year. Zynga is a phenomenon. More than 200 million people play its games each month. One person who doesn't feel Zynga's success is cause for celebration is video game designer Ian Bogost. Bogost thinks Zynga's games are mindless, designed to suck money out of players' pockets. To make his point he created a parody game of his own. As On the Media's P.J.

Analysis
2:00 pm
Fri November 18, 2011

Week In Politics: Gingrich, Debt Panel

Melissa Block speaks with our regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and Brookings Institution and David Brooks of The New York Times.

Sports
2:00 pm
Fri November 18, 2011

NBA In Turmoil As MLB Takes Care Of Business

While the professional basketball season is on the verge of collapse, Major League Baseball and its players wrapped up a new contract. Guy Raz talks with sportswriter Stefan Fatsis about what's next in the NBA negotiations and what's new for baseball with this agreement.

NPR Story
4:49 pm
Thu November 17, 2011

Obama Turns Focus On Pacific Allies

Originally published on Thu November 17, 2011 4:59 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

From NPR News, it's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Guy Raz.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. President Obama arrived in Indonesia today, the latest stop in a 10 day trip across the Pacific. He's used the trip to send a message that the U.S. is shifting its attention to the Asia Pacific region, both for economic and security reasons. That includes the announcement yesterday that the U.S. will deploy 2,500 Marines to Australia.

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Author Interviews
3:49 pm
Thu November 17, 2011

U.S. Behind The Curve In Drunk Driving, Author Finds

A new book called One for the Road explores the history of drunk driving and attitudes around it.
iStockphoto.com

When Barron Lerner was writing his book on the history of drunk driving in America — and efforts to control it — he carried out an experiment at home that involved a bottle of vodka, a shot glass and a Breathalyzer. He was the guinea pig.

"I was trying to figure out just how drunk you had to be in order to not drive safely," says Lerner, a professor of medicine and public health at Columbia University, who wrote One for the Road. He decided to drink and test his levels — but he didn't actually get into a car.

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Europe
3:09 pm
Thu November 17, 2011

Discovery Of Neo-Nazi Crime Spree Roils Germany

Germany has been rocked by allegations that a small, underground neo-Nazi group calling itself the Nationalist Socialist Underground carried out a 13-year-long crime spree that included murder, robbery and bombing. Here, a screen shot from a promotional DVD reportedly made by neo-Nazis Uwe Mundlos and Uwe Boenhardt. The two men committed suicide earlier this month.
Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 18, 2011 3:30 am

Germany is reeling from revelations this week that a small neo-Nazi group carried out a deadly, decade-long crime wave. Authorities blame the underground cell for the murders of nine immigrants and a policewoman, a string of bank robberies and a bombing. Two suspects are dead and two others are in custody.

The identity of the suspects came as a shock to many in a country that has worked hard to overcome the stain of Nazism. Now, the focus is on the apparent shortcomings of Germany's domestic security services.

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The Record
3:00 pm
Thu November 17, 2011

A Televised Singing Competition With A Mission

Pia Maria Holmgren (Sámi in Sweden) performs at last year's Liet International minority song contest.
Sandro Weltin/Council of Europe

Auditions are now underway for next May's Eurovision Song Contest — that often-ridiculed television spectacle that has drawn millions of viewers around the world every year since 1956. In 2012 the host country will be Azerbaijan, since that country fielded last year's winner.

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History
2:06 pm
Thu November 17, 2011

Dead Sea Scrolls On Display In Times Square

The ancient texts can be seen up close — right in the middle of New York City. There are some theatrics, but NPR's Margot Adler reports that the exhibit is happily understated.

NPR Story
2:00 pm
Thu November 17, 2011

Boston Occupy Movement Reaches Second Phase

Melissa Block checks back in with Jason Potteiger with the Occupy Boston movement. The recent college graduate was unemployed when we first talked to him last month. Now he's got a job, but he continues to work with the movement on various projects.

NPR Story
2:00 pm
Thu November 17, 2011

Pelosi Makes Joke At Perry's Expense

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi poked fun at GOP presidential candidate Rick Perry when she responded to his challenge to debate her next Monday. Pelosi said she had three other engagements that day — but forgot the third.

NPR Story
2:00 pm
Thu November 17, 2011

Occupy Protesters Fan Out Across New York

Occupy Wall Street protesters march to mark the movement's second month. Joel Rose

NPR Story
2:00 pm
Thu November 17, 2011

Calif. Prop 8 Supporters Can Defend Gay Marriage Ban

The California Supreme Court ruled today that the sponsors of the state's voter-approved amendment banning same-sex marriage have the right to defend the ban in court. Last year, a judge ruled Proposition 8 unconstitutional. The amendment's sponsors asked to defend the ban at the appellate level since both the governor and the attorney general have declined to do so. Richard Gonzales

Opinion
11:15 am
Thu November 17, 2011

National Book Award Winner Tells Tale Of Katrina

istockphoto.com

Jesmyn Ward's novel, Salvage the Bones, won this year's National Book Award in fiction.

When you live on the Mississippi Gulf Coast, stories of hurricanes are passed down through generations. For my parents the storm was called Camille, and on Aug. 17, 1969, it made landfall.

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Music Interviews
3:39 pm
Wed November 16, 2011

R.E.M., R.I.P.

R.E.M. in the early days. Left to right: Michael Stipe, Mike Mills, Bill Berry, Peter Buck.
Laura Levine

Originally published on Wed November 16, 2011 5:02 pm

They were four guys out of Athens, Ga., with a three-letter name — and one hell of an impact on rock. R.E.M. was Michael Stipe singing lead, Mike Mills on bass and harmonies, Peter Buck on guitar and Bill Berry on drums, until Berry left the band in 1997.

"We never expected the thing to last any longer than a couple of years to begin with," Stipe says. "And then when it did, and we were making records and people were interested in it, the band started getting bigger and bigger and bigger."

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Monkey See
3:35 pm
Wed November 16, 2011

DVD Picks: 'West Side Story'

'Tonight' Music: Richard Beymer and Natalie Wood played Tony and Maria in the 1961 film of West Side Story.
Fox Home Entertainment

Originally published on Wed November 16, 2011 5:02 pm

Time now for a home video recommendation from movie critic Bob Mondello. This week he's looking back a half-century, to a ground-breaking musical that won ten Oscars, West Side Story.

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Books News & Features
2:51 pm
Wed November 16, 2011

Ann Patchett Opens Parnassus Books In Nashville

The world of independent bookstores has a new member: Parnassus Books in Nashville, Tenn., opened its doors on Wednesday. The store has a marquee name behind it — best-selling novelist Ann Patchett, author of Bel Canto and State of Wonder, is the co-owner.

NPR Story
5:04 pm
Tue November 15, 2011

Lawmakers Consider Counting Pizza As a Veggie

Lawmakers say pizza and french fries deserve to keep their place in school cafeterias. New nutrition standards aimed at putting more fresh and healthy food in front of kids are being revised in a current House agriculture appropriations bill. The latest version says the tomato sauce on a slice of pizza is the equivalent of a vegetable. Critics are likening it to the "ketchup-as-a-vegetable-controversy" during the Reagan administration.

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