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Joe Serna served three tours in Afghanistan as a Green Beret. Judge Lou Olivera is a veteran, too, who served in the Army as an intelligence officer. But when they met, it wasn't on base. It was in a North Carolina courtroom. Serna had been struggling to adapt to life back home, and, after violating probation on DWI charge, he was sentenced by Olivera to a night in jail. He would have spent that time in his cell alone with his thoughts, if Olivera hadn't joined him. One year later, during a...

The Nobel committee made a bit of a surprising announcement Thursday morning: Bob Dylan was awarded the Nobel Prize in literature for, according to the Swedish Academy, "having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition." Dylan has written more than 900 pages of lyrics, but the Nobel Prize is primarily awarded to essayists, novelists and playwrights. Princeton University professor and historian Sean Wilentz says that Dylan fits right in with that crowd. Wilentz,...

Here at Goats and Soda, we're trying something new: We want to know what you want us to investigate. The first topic is girls in developing countries. Earlier this month, we gathered over 100 questions from our readers. We put three of them up for vote. More than 600 people voted, and this question was the winner: I would like to know more about about microloans, and if they are in fact helping women start businesses in the developing world. Thanks to everyone who...

Paternity leave can make a big difference in a dad's long-term engagement with the child, doctors find. Paid family leave also fosters breastfeeding and reduces the incidence of maternal depression. As part of All Things Considered's series Stretched: Working Parents' Juggling Act , NPR talked with Dr. Benard Dreyer , a developmental and behavioral pediatrician at the New York University School of Medicine and president of the American Academy of Pediatrics, to get a better sense of...

Last October, Goats and Soda began a series called #15Girls . The stories explored the lives of 15-year-olds who sought to take control and change their fate — despite daunting obstacles. It's been a year, and we wanted to check back with the girls we profiled and see how their lives have changed. We weren't able to reach them all, but we did find out how five of the teens are faring in 2016. Fatmeh When we met Fatmeh, she was a Syrian refugee living in Beqaa Valley, Lebanon. She and her...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: Back in the U.S. now. You probably know the name of Rosa Parks. You probably know that her refusal to move to the colored section in the back of a city bus sparked the Montgomery bus boycotts, one of the pivotal moments in the American civil rights movement. But what you might not know is that shortly after she worked alongside Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and others, she had to leave her home in Alabama to escape...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. SCOTT SIMON, HOST: These days it seems you can sue just about anybody and anything. The one place in the judicial system where it remains hard to take legal action is against individual countries. They're covered by what's known as sovereign immunity. This week, Jason Rezaian, The Washington Post reporter who was imprisoned by the Iranian government for 544 days, filed suit with his family against Iran for what they called...

Tim Bauerschmidt left home when he was 19. He would call or visit his parents in Michigan occasionally. Decades went by. After his father died last year, he knew his mother couldn't live by herself. She was 90, and he realized he didn't know her that well. "I had some stilted conversations," says Bauerschmidt. "She'd be on the other end of the phone when I talked to my dad. I'd have to say, 'Mom, are you there? Are you on the line?' [She would say] 'Oh yeah, I'm here.' " Bauerschmidt says it...

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Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton face off in the second presidential debate Sunday night at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri.

On a late summer day in 2010, John T. Williams, a Native American woodcarver, was walking across the street carrying his carving knife and a small piece of wood when he was shot and killed by a Seattle police officer. "He was carving an eagle at the moment," his brother Rick recalls, on a recent visit with StoryCorps. Rick tells his friend Jay Hollingsworth that his brother loved to carve — had been carving even at age 4, when he completed his first totem pole. He says John could walk and...

In the world of illegal wildlife trade, the most valuable appendage — even more than elephant ivory — is the horn of the rhinoceros. Investigative journalist Bryan Christy estimates that the wholesale market for rhino horn is roughly a quarter of a billion dollars. Christy, who traveled to Africa while investigating the rhino horn trade for National Geographic Magazine, tells Fresh Air 's Terry Gross that he looked forward to seeing his first rhino in the field while on...

It's hard to imagine a less likely Hillary Clinton supporter than Michael Chertoff. Chertoff led the Republicans' 1990s probe into the Clintons' land deal, known as the Whitewater investigation — and that led to the Monica Lewinsky scandal. Clinton would later vote against Chertoff for other key positions requiring Senate approval. In a dramatic turnaround, Chertoff just came out in support of Hillary Clinton for president. "The reality is ... it's a binary choice. This is not, 'What is your...

Mike Cruse is the father of a new baby. His daughter Olivia was born in July. But like most fathers in the U.S., he doesn't get paid parental leave. That means his wife, Stephanie, will have to take care of the baby mostly herself — an already difficult task that may be even harder for her since she's dealing with postpartum anxiety. Cruse, who manages the warehouse for a lighting company, had to take vacation days from his job to stay home and help for those first 10 days. Now he has no...

The idea behind the company Blue Apron is simple: Each week, it sends customers a box with recipe cards and fresh ingredients to make a handful of meals, each of them in just under 35 minutes. The company has grown quickly since its founding in 2012: It delivers around 8 million meals per month. Now, BuzzFeed reporter Caroline O'Donovan has uncovered some disturbing details about the company — reports of violence and code violations at one of its main packing facilities, in Richmond, Calif. ...

A friend of photographer Phillip Toledano once said "He is the most self-absorbed person I've ever met — but he wears it well." The Many Sad Fates of Mr. Toledano is a new short film in which the photographer, with the assistance of makeup artists, fortune tellers, and psychics, disguises himself as the various fates life might one day hold for him: Ending up a homeless alcoholic, a white-collar criminal cuffed and taken away by police, or a lonely senior, feeding a small dog from...

It's been one year since health officials in Michigan warned people in the city of Flint to stop drinking the tap water after a research team from Virginia Tech discovered elevated lead levels. To this day, Flint's water is still not safe to drink without a filter. While funding has been scarce to replace corroded pipes, Congress reached a deal this week that could send millions of dollars in aid to Flint. Lead pipes in Flint were severely corroded over the 18 months the city used water from...

During the presidential debate on Monday night, Hillary Clinton raised a 1973 federal lawsuit brought against Donald Trump and his company for alleged racial discrimination at Trump housing developments in New York. The Justice Department sued Donald Trump, his father, Fred, and Trump Management in order to obtain a settlement in which Trump and his father would promise not to discriminate. The case eventually was settled two years later after Trump tried to countersue the Justice Department...

We've all been there — having fun relaxing with friends and family, when someone says something a little racially off. Sometimes it's subtle, like the friend who calls Thai food "exotic." Other times it's more overt, like that in-law who's always going on about "the illegals." In any case, it can be hard to know how to respond. Even the most level-headed among us have faltered trying to navigate the fraught world of racial awkwardness. So what exactly do you do? We delve into the issue on...

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton went head-to-head Monday night in the first presidential debate . NPR's politics team, with help from reporters and editors who cover national security, immigration, business, foreign policy and more, live annotated the debate. Portions of the debate with added analysis are underlined in yellow, followed by context and fact check. You can follow more highlights of the debate at nprpolitics.org . Note: The transcript on this page was updated live as the...

As we surf from website to website, we are being tracked — that's not news. What is news, revealed in a recent paper by researchers at Princeton University, is that the tracking is no longer just about the "cookies" that record our tastes. The researchers surveyed a million websites and found that state-of-the-art tracking is a lot more sophisticated, allowing websites to track the fingerprints left by our devices. Princeton's Arvind Narayanan and Steven Englehardt studied how all the things...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. (SOUNDBITE OF BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN SONG, "BORN IN THE U.S.A.") MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: Now it's time for our segment called Words You'll Hear. And that's where we take a word or a phrase that we think will be in the news in the coming days and let you know what it's all about. And this week, our words are the boss. (SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "BORN IN THE U.S.A.") BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN: (Singing) Born down in a dead man's town. The first kick I took...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. (SOUNDBITE OF BUCKWHEAT ZYDECO SONG, "ZYDECO LA LOUISIANEE") MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: You know that we often try to take note of the deaths of people who've made a mark on history or politics, in the culture or in sports. Frankly, we can't get to them all, but we do feel a special obligation to note those you might have missed. So today, we want to tell you about a legend in zydeco, a musical genre born in the bayous of Louisiana....

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: We're going to spend the next couple of minutes talking about work and what work means. In a few minutes, we'll hear from the author of a new book about the African-American women who found work with NASA and, against all odds, became instrumental to the first manned trip to space. The book is called "Hidden Figures," and my conversation with author Margot Lee Shetterly is coming up. We'll also hear about the...

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