KASU

Karen Tricot Steward / KUAR

As Content Development Director, Karen Tricot Steward helps with the creation of news and cultural programming and helps set standards and best practices. She manages digital content on our website and social media platforms. She also works with local program producers and people who pitch programming ideas to public radio. In addition, Karen coordinates the internship program, helping fulfill public radio’s goal of serving the community by being a place of learning.

She started at KUAR in 2001 as a news reporter. She has also served as local host and news anchor for Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

For her news reporting, she has won several awards from the Arkansas Associated Press for stories on topics like the Little Rock mayoral race and Iraq war veterans in Arkansas. She also won a first place award from the Society of Professional Journalists for investigative reporting. Karen has worked at Stone Ward, an advertising agency in Little Rock, as well as for the University of Utah and the University of Iowa. Karen has a B.A. in Journalism from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock.

Phone: 501-569-8491

E-mail: karen@kuar.org

The following is a statement from the Broyles family regarding the death of former University of Arkansas football coach, athletic director, ABC commentator, and Alzheimer’s advocate Frank Broyles. Coach Broyles, 92, died from complications of Alzheimer’s Disease, on August 14, 2017. 

“It is with profound sadness that we announce the passing of Coach Frank Broyles. He passed peacefully in his home surrounded by his loved ones.

Arkansas has carried out its first execution since 2005, just four minutes before the inmate's death warrant was set to expire.

Ledell Lee's execution was scheduled for 7 p.m., but an evening of appeals kept him alive longer. The U.S. Supreme Court nearly halted his execution at one point in the evening but ultimately decided, 5 to 4, that the state could proceed.

"A lethal injection was administered at 11:44 p.m. and the coroner pronounced Ledell Lee dead at 11:56 p.m.," announced Soloman Graves, a spokesman for the Arkansas Department of Correction.

Governor Asa Hutchinson spoke to the media for an hour Thursday, saying he has visited with officials at the Arkansas Department of Correction and now has great confidence that the seven executions set for this month will be carried out successfully.

"I reviewed the protocols, procedures and training. But, obviously there's contingency plans. That's why we have communication directly from the chambers there to my office," said Hutchinson.

Seven Arkansas inmates are scheduled to be executed over 11 days this month, starting Monday.

Arkansas is set to conduct four double executions over ten days this month. That's already an unprecedented rate and in some states, like Oklahoma, double executions aren't even allowed.

In part two of our conversation with Sean Murphy, who covers executions for the Associated Press out of Oklahoma, Karen Tricot Steward talks to him about witnessing the highly-publicized botched execution of Clayton Lockett. That execution used the same controversial sedative Arkansas will use and put an end to back-to-back killings in that state. 

Controversy continues over Arkansas's rush to conduct four double executions in four days this month.

One issue raising concern is the use of the common sedative midazolam, marketed under the trade name Versed. The drug has been tied to botched executions where inmates wake up during the procedure. Some states have stopped using it altogether for lethal injections.

KUAR News spoke with Sean Murphy in Oklahoma, who covers executions for the Associated Press. He witnessed the highly-publicized botched execution of Clayton Lockett in 2014.

A relatively new nonprofit news organization focusing on issues surrounding the U.S. criminal justice system is tracking the cases of death row inmates scheduled to be executed in Arkansas and nine other states. 

The Marshall Project collaborates with other news outlets and journalists to publish investigative reports on national controversy and reform within the criminal justice system.

Federal law says if you've purchased tax-free online, you need to pay a tax to the state. But, no one's really doing that. The problem: Arkansas relies heavily on sales tax to support essential government services.

When it comes to federal legislation requiring online merchants to collect sales tax, Republican U.S. Representative Steve Womack of Arkansas has long been one the more prominent GOP backers of such a measure.

KUAR's Karen Tricot Steward spoke with Representative Womack on the issue.

Little Rock Police are apologizing and dropping the misdemeanor charge against Democratic state representative and civil rights attorney John Walker. He was taken into custody Monday for filming a traffic stop and refusing to leave the scene

Chief of Police Kent Buckner now says Walker never should have been arrested.