KASU

James Doubek

Doubek started at NPR as a part-time production assistant in 2015 before joining full time as an associate producer in 2017. He previously was an intern at NPR's Washington Desk in the summer of 2015.

Updated at 2:27 p.m. ET Sunday

North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un said the country will close down its main nuclear testing site sometime in May, South Korea says.

South Korean presidential press secretary Yoon Young-chan said Sunday that Kim agreed to the plan during a meeting between the leader and South Korean President Moon Jae-in on Friday.

European law enforcement agencies say they've arrested the administrators of a website that allowed users to pay to knock selected websites offline.

The site Webstresser.org let paying customers — for as little as 15 euros a month, according to the European law enforcement agency Europol — launch distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks to shut down websites or Internet users.

A 14-year-old African-American boy stopped to ask for directions to school in a Detroit suburb but was shot at instead, according to prosecutors.

Retired firefighter Jeffery Zeigler, 53, who is white, was arraigned on Friday "on assault with intent to murder and felony firearm" charges, according to the Oakland County Sheriff's Office.

Brennan Walker of Rochester Hills, Mich., says he overslept and missed the bus to school Thursday morning. He didn't have his phone. He tried to trace the bus route, but ended up lost and began knocking on doors for directions.

Milos Forman, known for directing the classic films One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest and Amadeus, has died at age 86, his manager tells NPR.

Forman's wife Martina told the Czech news agency CTK that Forman died Friday in Connecticut after a short illness.

His manager, Dennis Aspland, confirmed his death was at a hospital near his home in Warren, Conn.

Russian officials condemned the U.S.-led airstrikes on three sites in Syria early Saturday, calling the attacks "treacherous and insane" and a "clear and present danger to world peace."

The U.S., U.K. and France carried out the strikes in the early morning hours on targets that U.S. officials said were linked to a Syrian government chemical weapons program. The strikes were a response to an alleged chemical weapons attack carried out by Syrian President Bashar Assad's regime on April 7.

Updated at 8:40 p.m. ET

A judge has issued an arrest warrant for Brazil's former President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, who will wait in prison while he appeals a corruption conviction. The country's highest court ruled early Thursday that he could not remain free during the appeal process.

In a 6-5 decision, the Supreme Federal Tribunal rejected da Silva's request to remain free while he appeals a 12-year prison sentence for corruption.

Updated 3:21 p.m. ET

One U.S. soldier was killed and another American was wounded in an overnight roadside bomb explosion in Manbij, Syria.

They were in a convoy. One other coalition fighter, confirmed now to be from the U.K., was also killed in action. Five others were wounded. They were not local fighters, but part of the coalition.

Prior to Thursday night, there had been three U.S. coalition members killed in Syria.

Multiple companies say they're pulling their advertisements from conservative Fox News host Laura Ingraham's show after she sent a tweet mocking Parkland shooting survivor and gun-control activist David Hogg.

Nestle US, Hulu and Nutrish confirmed on Twitter that they are removing advertising from Ingraham's show. Media reports say TripAdvisor, Expedia, Wayfair and Johnson & Johnson are pulling their support as well.

Updated at 12:10 a.m. ET Friday with additional comment from Weber Shandwick

Michigan State University spent more than $500,000 to keep tabs on the online activities of former Olympic gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar's victims and journalists covering the case, according to the Lansing State Journal.

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