KASU

Chris Arnold

Yesterday on Capitol Hill, Tina Meins and other survivors of gun violence joined Democratic senators to push for tougher gun control laws. In the San Bernardino mass killing last year, Meins' father and 13 of his co-workers were shot to death.

"In mere seconds, my life and the lives of my mother and sister were irrevocably changed," she says.

The Dalai Lama, visiting the White House today, offered President Obama condolences for the Orlando shootings.

The president and the Tibetan spiritual leader also talked about issues facing Tibetans living within China. The White House said in a statement:

"The President emphasized his strong support for the preservation of Tibet's unique religious, cultural, and linguistic traditions and the equal protection of human rights of Tibetans in China."

Federal Reserve policymakers on Wednesday will tell the world their latest plans for raising interest rates. The goal is to keep the economy on track. And right now, that is not an easy thing.

Members of the Federal Open Markets Committee track an array of sometimes conflicting data. Economists call this the Fed's "dashboard." So what are the dashboard's instruments telling us about where the economy is headed next?

Capt. Yellen's Dashboard

Why should anybody care that billionaire George Soros is trading again and making big bets that will pay off if economies around the world fall on harder times?

When the 85-year-old hedge fund founder did something like this a decade ago, the U.S. housing market was about to implode, Lehman Brothers would soon collapse and the U.S. and global economy was headed into what economists call "the toilet."

One thing Soros appears to be most concerned about this time around is weakness in China.

When two armed men burst into a McDonald's in Besancon, France, on Sunday, it's safe to say they chose the wrong fast-food franchise for a stickup. French police say the men in their 20s fired a warning shot and cleaned out the registers of about 2,000 euros ($2,280).

But unbeknownst to the alleged would-be thieves, among the 40 McDonald's diners reportedly that night were 11 off-duty members of an elite French special forces team that specializes in hostage situations. Qui aurait su!?

The world of mixed martial arts has suffered a heavy blow with the unexpected death of one of its best known athletes. Kimbo Slice, whose given name was Kevin Ferguson, reportedly died Monday of as-yet-undisclosed causes at a Florida hospital. He was 42.

"We are all shocked and saddened by the devastating and untimely loss of Kimbo Slice," Scott Coker, head of the fight promotion company Bellator MMA, said in a statement. He added:

Lonnie David Franklin Jr. preyed upon prostitutes and drug addicts in Los Angeles in a string of murders going back to the 1980s. Prosecutors said he dumped the bodies in trash bins and alleyways. He came to be called the Grim Sleeper.

But one woman he had shot in the chest, raped, pushed out of his car and left for dead didn't die. Enierta Washington survived. And she testified against Franklin at his trial. Photographs of some of Franklin's victims — hundreds of photographs — were found in Franklin's home, police said.

When the chair of the U.S. Federal Reserve speaks, the world listens. Well, OK, the entire world doesn't listen, but investors and economists all over the world do. And Janet Yellen's take on the health of the U.S. economy was largely positive. Speaking at the World Affairs Council of Philadelphia on Monday, Yellen said:

The city of Chicago today released hundreds of videos of police shootings and arrests, some in cases where critics contend police used excessive force. The city is struggling to regain public support for its police force after the fatal shooting of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald in 2014. Since then, other shootings in Chicago, many involving young black men, have fueled ongoing public outrage in the city.

For years, Heartland Regional Medical Center, a nonprofit hospital in the small city of St. Joseph, Mo., had quietly sued thousands of its low-income patients over their unpaid bills.

But after an investigation by NPR and ProPublica prompted further scrutiny by Sen. Charles Grassley, the hospital overhauled its financial assistance policy late last year and forgave the debts of thousands of former patients.

As if an $81-million-dollar bank heist wasn't spectacular enough, it now appears that the crime may mark the first time one country has used malicious code to steal money from another country.

Verizon and two labor unions representing some 40,000 workers have reached a tentative agreement to end a strike that has lasted more than six weeks.

Labor Secretary Thomas Perez announced the deal today in a statement, saying, "The parties have reached an agreement in principle on a four-year contract, resolving the open issues in the ongoing labor dispute between Verizon's workers, unions, and management."

Nearly two dozen athletes from six countries and in five sports who competed in the 2012 London Olympics have tested positive for banned substances after doping samples were rechecked.

In the wake of a spectacular $81 million heist involving Bangladesh's central bank, the top official for the messaging system used to move billions of dollars every day throughout the global banking system says he's going on the offensive against cybercriminals.

Gottfried Leibbrandt, chief executive of the Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunication (SWIFT), announced the plan today in Brussels.

French authorities launched a surprise search of Google's offices in Paris early Tuesday morning as part of an inquiry into the tech company's tax dealings in France.

Prosecutors said in a statement that the raid, which also involved 25 computer experts, is part of an investigation launched in June 2015 into possible tax evasion and money laundering.

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