Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a blogger and producer who works with NPR's Morning Edition and Digital Media group. In addition to coordinating Web features, he frequently contributes to NPR's blogs, from The Two Way and All Tech Considered to The Salt.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to leading the London 2012 Olympics blog, The Torch. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR.org.

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, the site won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell trains both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between departments. Other shows he has worked with include All Things Considered, Fresh Air, and Talk of the Nation.

Prior to joining NPR in late 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage out of Qatar.

Chappell's work for CNN also included producing Web stories and editing digital video for SI.com, as well as editing and producing stories for CNN.com's features division. He also worked at the network's video and research library.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

From 2002-2003, Chappell served as editor-in-chief of The Trans-Atlantic Journal, a business and lifestyle monthly geared for expatriate Europeans working and living in the United States.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

Pages

The Two-Way
2:59 pm
Mon June 17, 2013

FTC Can Sue Firms In 'Pay For Delay' Drug Deals, Court Rules

The Supreme Court has ruled that the FTC can challenge arrangements between makers of generic drugs and makers of brand-name products such as AndroGel, seen here on a computer monitor screen.
Reed Saxon AP

When the maker of a brand-name drug pays a maker of generic drugs to not produce a lower-priced version of their product, the Federal Trade Commission can challenge the arrangement on antitrust grounds, the Supreme Court ruled Monday. The ruling may end the era of what regulators call "pay-for-delay" deals.

The justices voted 5-3 to allow a case to go forward in which the FTC is challenging one of many such deals. Several companies are involved in the case, including Solvay Pharmaceuticals, maker of AndroGel, and generic-drug maker Actavis.

Read more
The Two-Way
3:27 pm
Fri June 14, 2013

Australian General's Frank Talk On Sexual Abuse Wins Fans

Lt. Gen. David Morrison, Australia's army chief, has simple advice for those who don't want women in the service: "Get out."
YouTube

Read more
The Two-Way
6:31 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

Lost In 1968 Battle, Marine's Dog Tag Found Again

After a photo of Lanny Martinson's dog tag was placed on Facebook and elsewhere, Marines and veterans helped track him down. Martinson lost the tag in Vietnam in 1968.
Facebook

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 8:08 pm

Lanny Martinson was a 23-year-old Marine sergeant in Vietnam when he last held his dog tags. In the 45 years since, he thought they were gone forever, lost in the mad rush to save his life after he and other Marines walked into a minefield.

He'll soon be getting one of those dog tags back, after a network of people worked together to find the tag's owner. When they contacted him, Martinson was just at the point of filing papers to request new dog tags, all these years later.

Read more
The Two-Way
2:05 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

In Gay America, Optimism Abounds As Stigma Persists, Pew Says

A new survey of more than 1,000 lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender adults finds that more than 90 percent feel more accepted in society than they did 10 years ago. Here, a woman displays her pro-gay T-shirt at the L.A. Pride Parade in West Hollywood last Sunday.
David McNew Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 2:48 pm

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender Americans say they feel more accepted in society than they did 10 years ago, and they're overwhelmingly optimistic that the trend will continue. But a sweeping new Pew Research Center survey also finds persistent levels of stigmatization and secrecy in the community.

Read more
The Two-Way
4:46 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

Egyptian Author Sentenced To Prison For Book 'Where Is God?'

Egyptian author and human rights activist Karam Saber has been sentenced to five years in prison, after a court found his writings to have insulted religion, reports the Egyptian news website Aswat Masriya.

The complaint against Saber and his book Ayn Allah (Where Is God?) was initially filed in 2011, months after the fall of former president Hosni Mubarak's regime. Saber's was reportedly the first blasphemy case of its kind after Egypt's revolution.

Read more
The Two-Way
3:55 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

Huge System Of Storms Predicted To March East From Midwest

A map shows the chance of severe thunderstorms Wednesday evening, with the National Weather Service predicting strong winds and storms moving eastward to the mid-Atlantic Thursday.
NOAA

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 8:03 pm

The National Weather Service warns of a massive storm system that will make its way eastward from Iowa to Maryland in the next 24 hours, as strong winds, thunderstorms, and hail are predicted to hit areas from the upper Midwest to the Mid-Atlantic beginning Wednesday and continuing Thursday.

Read more
The Two-Way
4:14 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Egypt Said To Be In Talks With Ethiopia Over Nile Dam Plan

A May 28 photo shows the Blue Nile in Ethiopia, during a diversion ceremony for the country's dam project. Egypt says it is against the plan.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Egypt's leaders are negotiating with Ethiopia over a Nile River dam project the Ethiopians have begun building, according to reports. The news comes after a week of forceful talk about the dam project, including one session with Egypt's President Mohamed Morsi in which politicians discussed armed intervention, apparently not aware their words were being broadcast on live television.

Read more
The Two-Way
2:24 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Google Asks Permission To Publish Info About FISA Requests

Google was recently allowed to release general data about national security letters it receives, as seen in this chart. The company is now asking the U.S. government to allow it to publish similar data on national security requests, including those made under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act.
Google

As Google and other large tech companies cope with the aftermath of recent reports that the National Security Agency has had broad access to their users' data, the search giant is asking the U.S. government for permission to publish the number of national security requests it receives, including those made under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act.

Read more
The Two-Way
5:44 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

World War II-Era German Bomber Raised Near English Coast

A Dornier 17 bomber, which Germany used in the first years of World War II, is lowered onto a salvage barge in the English Channel, 70 years after the craft was shot down.
RAF Museum

A rare Dornier 17, an aluminum-skinned German bomber that flew in the Battle of Britain, has been salvaged from the murky waters of the English Channel. The plane was shot down more than 70 years ago near the coast of Kent.

"The Royal Air Force Museum is pleased to announce the successful lift of the only known example of the Dornier Do17," said the RAF Museum's director general, Peter Dye, Monday. He called the feat an "incredibly complex and delicate operation."

Read more
The Two-Way
4:45 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

'I'm Not Satisfied': Family's First Graduate Has Bigger Goals

Recent high school graduate Dajina Bell got her diploma after working hard to turn around her GPA. An anonymous donor who heard her story on Colorado Public Radio set up a scholarship for her.
Jenny Bundin CPR

When Denver teenager Dajina Bell graduated from high school last week, she celebrated a remarkable academic and personal comeback. Bell's high school years, marked early on by her brother's death and a host of other troubles, ended with her becoming her family's first graduate.

Read more
The Two-Way
1:50 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

BP Ends Oil Spill Cleanup In Gulf, Except For Louisiana

BP is scaling back its cleanup efforts from the Deepwater Horizon oilspill in areas outside Louisiana. Here, a photo from last September shows alluvial clay and tar mats on the shore of Elmer's Island, in Jefferson Parish, La.
Gerald Herbert AP

BP is ending its cleanup of the massive Deepwater Horizon oil spill in three Gulf Coast states this month, leaving Louisiana as the only state with ongoing cleanup linked to the company's Deepwater Horizon Response effort. Reports of oil sightings in Alabama, Mississippi, and Florida will soon be the U.S. Coast Guard's responsibility to investigate.

For NPR's Newscast unit, Debbie Elliott reports:

Read more
The Two-Way
6:37 pm
Fri June 7, 2013

Grand Jury Indicts Ariel Castro On 329 Counts

Ariel Castro, whose Cleveland, Ohio, home allegedly became a prison for three kidnapped young women, has been indicted on 329 counts by a grand jury. Other charges include 177 counts of kidnapping and 139 counts of rape, as well as aggravated murder, a charge stemming from "the unlawful termination of another's pregnancy."

Read more
The Two-Way
3:19 pm
Fri June 7, 2013

U.S. Drone Strike Reportedly Kills Seven In Pakistan

A U.S. drone aircraft fired two missiles at a compound in a remote area of northwest Pakistan, killing seven people Friday night, according to reports. Pakistani officials who spoke about the strike to the AP say it killed seven militants.

Read more
The Two-Way
2:23 pm
Fri June 7, 2013

Wal-Mart Meeting Spurs Protests Over Low Pay, Safety Issues

Wal-Mart U.S. CEO Bill Simon speaks to shareholders at Bud Walton Arena in Fayetteville, Ark., during this week's shareholders' meeting. The company is coping with a bribery scandal, as well as demands from workers.
Gareth Patterson AP

Retailing giant Wal-Mart Stores' annual shareholders' meeting this week showed signs of the company's recent turbulence, as protesters assembled at corporate headquarters to shout slogans and demands.

Despite a court-issued restraining order, the protesters, including workers who are on strike, decried low wages and called for better safety procedures for supply-chain workers. And some of their views were heard inside the meeting, as well.

Read more
The Two-Way
4:57 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

Tropical Storm Andrea Makes Landfall In Florida

The National Hurricane Center's tracking system placed Tropical Storm Andrea on Florida's Gulf coast, level with Gainesville, Thursday afternoon. The storm is expected to spread rain and strong winds along the Southeastern coast tonight and Friday.
National Hurricane Center

Originally published on Thu June 6, 2013 5:02 pm

Tropical Storm Andrea has made landfall on Florida's Big Bend area, the National Hurricane Center in Miami reports. As of 5:45 p.m. ET, the center's tracking system placed the storm on the state's Gulf coast, level with Gainesville. Andrea is expected to spread rain and strong winds along the Southeastern coast tonight and Friday.

Read more
The Two-Way
4:10 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

Gatlin Beats Bolt In 100 Meters For The First Time

American sprinter Justin Gatlin celebrates winning the 100m men's race at the IAAF Golden Gala at Stadio Olimpico in Rome Thursday. He defeated world record-holder Usain Bolt in the event.
Paolo Bruno Getty Images

Read more
The Two-Way
3:12 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

Baby Moose Benefits From Anglers' Unlikely Catch And Release

Dr. Karen Sciascia of Red Hill, Pa., holds a baby moose she and Four Rivers Fishing Co. guide Seth McLean rescued from a river in southwestern Montana, in a photo taken just before they released the animal on the bank where its mother waited.
Four Rivers Fishing Co. AP

Dr. Karen Sciascia of Red Hill, Pa., has delivered thousands of babies in her career. But on a vacation to Montana this week, she helped deliver another life from danger, as she and her fishing guide saved a baby moose that was separated from its mother as they crossed a river.

Read more
The Two-Way
5:26 pm
Wed June 5, 2013

Andrea, First Named Storm Of 2013 Season, Forms In Gulf

The National Hurricane Center is tracking Tropical Storm Andrea, currently in the eastern Gulf of Mexico, on its website.
NWS

Tropical Storm Andrea, the first named storm of the new hurricane season, has formed in the eastern portion of the Gulf of Mexico. Forecasters expect the storm to bring heavy rains to Florida before moving up the East Coast.

Read more
The Two-Way
4:48 pm
Wed June 5, 2013

DEA Arrests Scarsdale Mom In Massive Pot-Growing Scheme

A photograph taken on May 20, 2013, by the DEA Strike Force shows some of the marijuana plants the agency says were grown by a woman from a wealthy New York suburb, in a warehouse in the Queens borough of New York.
DEA AP

Originally published on Wed June 5, 2013 7:59 pm

Andrea Sanderlin, a mother who drives a Mercedes SUV and lives in a large Scarsdale, N.Y., home, is facing serious drug charges after federal investigators accused her of being the mastermind behind an operation growing nearly 3,000 marijuana plants in a warehouse in Queens.

Read more
The Two-Way
3:11 pm
Wed June 5, 2013

TSA Says It Won't Relax Carry-On Ban Of Knives, Other Items

A graphic released by the TSA earlier this year announced coming changes to the agency's Prohibited Items List, which it said would allow small knives. The TSA now says those items will remain banned from carry-on bags.
TSA

Originally published on Wed June 5, 2013 7:59 pm

Small knives, golf clubs, and other items that had been poised to be allowed in air passengers' carry-on luggage will instead remain prohibited, the Transportation Security Administration confirmed Wednesday. The reversal follows a review process in which the agency heard from passenger advocates, law enforcement, and others.

"After extensive engagement with the Aviation Security Advisory Committee, law enforcement officials, passenger advocates, and other important stakeholders, TSA will continue to enforce the current prohibited items list," the agency said in a statement.

Read more
The Two-Way
1:45 pm
Wed June 5, 2013

Obama Names Susan Rice As New National Security Adviser

President Barack Obama announces a staff shakeup Wednesday, naming U.N. Ambassador Susan Rice (right) to replace the retiring Tom Donilon. He also nominated former White House aide Samantha Power (left) to succeed Rice at the U.N.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 5, 2013 2:55 pm

President Obama has announced his choice of U.N. Ambassador Susan Rice as the next national security adviser, an appointment that does not require Senate confirmation. Congressional Republicans have sharply criticized Rice for erroneous statements she made after the attacks on a U.S. diplomatic post in Benghazi, Libya, last September.

Read more
The Two-Way
4:34 pm
Tue June 4, 2013

Beer Fridge Blamed For Cellphone Network Blackout

A row of beer cans in Australia, where a man's beer fridge has been blamed for playing havoc with the cellphone network in several neighborhoods.
Torsten Blackwood AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 4:50 pm

Faced with reports of a "black spot" that interfered with the mobile network in several neighborhoods, technicians at Australian cellphone provider Telstra say they recently found the source of the problem: a man's beer fridge in his garage. The refrigerator was tracked by "software robots" and workers wielding special antennas.

Read more
The Two-Way
3:44 pm
Tue June 4, 2013

Ohio State President Will Retire In Wake Of Latest Gaffes

Ohio State president Gordon Gee, seen here at last month's spring commencement, has announced his retirement. Gee came under fire for his remarks on Catholics, other schools, rival athletic conferences, and coaches.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Ohio State University president Gordon Gee will retire on July 1, ending his leadership of the school that was recently embarrassed by his verbal miscues. Gee, 69, recently sparked anger with comments he made about Catholics and rival universities.

Gee made those comments, reportedly intended as jokes, at a session of Ohio State's Athletic Council.

Read more
The Two-Way
1:43 pm
Tue June 4, 2013

Former Rep. 'Duke' Cunningham Freed After Bribery Sentence

Former Rep. Randy "Duke" Cunningham, seen here with his wife, Nancy, in 2005, has finished serving a seven-year sentence for bribery and tax evasion.
Lenny Ignelzi AP

Former California Rep. Randy "Duke" Cunningham is a free man today, after spending more than seven years in prison on bribery and other charges. A distinguished Vietnam War veteran and former Navy pilot, Cunningham's 15-year career in Congress ended abruptly when he admitting to taking $2.4 million in bribes from defense contractors and evading taxes.

Read more
The Two-Way
6:29 pm
Mon June 3, 2013

Mississippi Man Indicted On Charges Of Mailing Ricin Poision

James Everett Dutschke has been indicted on five counts related to letters containing the poison ricin that were sent to President Obama and others.
Rogelio V. Solis AP

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 7:45 pm

James Everett Dutschke, the Mississippi man arrested in April on suspicions that he sent letters containing the poison ricin to President Obama and other officials, has been indicted on five federal charges, from sending threats in the mail to knowingly making and possessing "a biological agent... for use as a weapon."

Maximum punishments for the counts leveled against Dutschke, 41, range from five years to life in prison.

Read more

Pages