KASU

Associated Press

A former state and local elections official says she's making another run for Arkansas secretary of state.

Susan Inman announced Tuesday she's seeking the Democratic nomination for the post, currently held by Republican Mark Martin. Martin was first elected to the post in 2010 and is barred from seeking re-election next year because of term limits.

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — A monthly survey of business leaders suggests that business conditions worsened last month but that the economy will pick up over the next few months in nine Midwestern and Plains states, according to a report issued Tuesday.

The Mid-America Business Conditions Index dropped to 56.1 in July after reaching 62.3 in June. The May figure was 55.5.

FORREST CITY, Ark. (AP) — A technical institute in Arkansas plans to merge with a neighboring community college.

The Times-Herald (http://bit.ly/2uFwsMV) reports the board of trustees at Crowley's Ridge Technical Institute voted 3-2 to merge with East Arkansas Community College. All three members who voted in favor of the merge were appointed this week by Gov. Asa Hutchinson.

Officials of the technical institute say they're concerned about how the meeting was called and that they weren't notified.

Jackson County Sheriff's Department Facebook Page

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) - A 16-year-old has been charged as an adult with capital murder in the shooting death of an Arkansas police officer.

A prosecutor says he plans to charge a man accused of crashing his vehicle into a Ten Commandments monument outside the Arkansas Capitol with first-degree criminal mischief.

Larry Jegley told The Associated Press Monday that 32-year-old Michael Tate Reed faces up to 10 years in prison if convicted on the felony charge.

His attorney wasn't immediately available for comment.

Reed was arrested last month after Little Rock police say he intentionally drove into the monument, destroying it less than 24 hours after it was erected.

Attorneys for the state of Arkansas want a court to cancel subpoenas issued in the battle over a gay-rights ordinance in Fayetteville, saying they're too broad.

The state Supreme Court struck down Fayetteville's anti-discrimination ordinance this year, saying it violates state law, but justices didn't rule on whether law is constitutional because that question wasn't addressed in the lower court.

A former Arkansas Senate president who admitted spending more than $150,000 of campaign funds on personal items has been released from federal prison.

The Jonesboro Sun reports that former Sen. Paul Bookout was released from federal prison earlier this month and will complete the remainder of his sentence at his home in Jonesboro.

Bookout pleaded guilty to one count of federal mail fraud and was sentenced to 18 months in prison. He began serving his sentence in May 2016 at a minimum-security prison in Illinois.

Arkansas Historic Preservation Program

JONESBORO, Ark. (AP) — A 110-year-old Jonesboro building listed on the National Register of Historic Places is set for demolition after a judge dismissed an appeal of a condemnation order.

The city of Jonesboro plans to demolish the Rosse's Home Ice Co. building because the structure has fallen into disrepair. According to the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette (http://bit.ly/2vjg70w), the city notified the building's owner in February 2015 that the building was dangerous and should be torn down.

Little Rock's annual music festival, Riverfest, is suspending operations after four decades.

The Riverfest, Inc., board of directors announced Tuesday that 2017 was the last year for the music festival in downtown Little Rock and North Little Rock. The festival's executive director, DeAnna Korte, says rising costs and more competition from other festivals made it difficult for Riverfest to continue.

Korte says hot and rainy weather in May and June also affected Riverfest's ability to be successful.

A commission that oversees Arkansas judges has filed charges of failing to pay state and federal income taxes against Saline County Circuit Court Judge Bobby McCallister.

The Arkansas Judicial Discipline and Disability Commission said Tuesday that McCallister appears to have filed no more than tax returns since 1995, but said it isn't clear how much he may owe.

Attorneys for McCallister didn't immediately return phone calls for comment.

Wikipedia

HOT SPRINGS, Ark. (AP) — A group from Little Rock is acquiring the Arlington Hotel in Hot Springs for an undisclosed amount of money.

The Hot Springs Sentinel-Record newspaper reported Monday (http://bit.ly/2ubw3EX) that Sky Capital Group LP is buying the state's largest hotel from Southwest Hotels Inc., which has operated the hotel since 1954.

The Arlington Hotel has 478 rooms, along with a spa, a bathhouse, a convention center, ballroom and a lobby bar. Sky Capital also operates the Four Points Sheraton in Little Rock.

Pixabay

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — A new system will soon alert Missourians when a law enforcement officer is killed or injured.

Gov. Eric Greitens on Friday signed a bill creating the "Blue Alert" system. Similar to Amber Alerts, the system would notify the public when someone who injured or killed a law enforcement officer is on the run.

The alert system was part of several crime-related changes to state law approved by the Legislature in May. The law also increases penalties for assaulting law enforcement officers.

A Christian-themed movie studio has donated $25,000 toward replacing a Ten Commandments monument outside the Arkansas Capitol that was destroyed last month.

PureFlix Entertainment donated the funds Thursday toward the monument, which was destroyed by a man who smashed his vehicle into the granite display less than 24 hours after it was installed on the Capitol's grounds. PureFlix is the production studio for the movie "God's Not Dead" and its sequel, which was filmed in Little Rock in 2015.

Wikipedia

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Officials say three more Arkansas counties have been added to the list of counties that are eligible for disaster unemployment assistance because of severe weather earlier this year.

Arkansas finance officials say the state ended its fiscal year with a $15.7 million surplus after a boost in sales tax collections over the past two months helped restore most of the budget cuts enacted earlier.

The Department of Finance and Administration said Wednesday the state ended the fiscal year with $5.3 billion in net available revenue, which was $19 million below the previous fiscal year. Arkansas' fiscal year ended Friday.

Pixabay

JONESBORO, Ark. (AP) — No one was injured when a short-lived tornado swept through Jonesboro, damaging an apartment complex and downing trees and power lines in the northeast Arkansas city.

The National Weather Service in Memphis, Tennessee, said the Monday morning storm had winds of up to 105 mph (168 kph). More severe weather moved through central and northern Arkansas on Tuesday afternoon as well, with electricity knocked out to thousands of people. There were no immediate reports of damage or injuries.

pixabay.com

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court has ruled for same-sex couples who complained an Arkansas birth certificate law discriminated against them.

The justices on Monday issued an unsigned opinion reversing an Arkansas high court ruling that upheld the law.

Under the law, married lesbian couples had to get a court order to have both spouses listed as parents on their children's birth certificates.

Wikipedia

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Gov. Bill Haslam is headed to Europe next week to try to recruit more foreign investment in Tennessee.

Haslam and Economic and Community Development Commissioner Bob Rolfe plant to visit the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, Sweden, Finland and Germany. They are scheduled to leave on Monday and return June 30.

More than 500 European businesses operate in Tennessee, employing about 62,000 people. More than $3.8 billion has been invested in the state by European companies since 2011.

Pixabay

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Forecasters have issued a flash flood watch for eastern and southern Arkansas as Tropical Storm Cindy heads toward the state.

KEISER, Ark. (AP) — The herbicide dicamba has ruined about 100 acres of soybeans at a state-funded agriculture experiment station in northeastern Arkansas.

Northeast Research and Extension Center Director Chuck Wilson told the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette (http://bit.ly/2rr6qKq) the afflicted field will be tilled and replanted. He said the damage was discovered Friday and that officials aren't certain where the herbicide originated.

"We're going to have to start over," Wilson said.

Jackson County Sheriff's Department Facebook Page

NEWPORT, Ark. (AP) — A suspect has been arrested in the killing of a decorated northeast Arkansas police officer who was fatally shot while assisting another officer with a traffic stop, police said.

Wikipedia

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Missouri lawmakers are returning to the Capitol for a special legislative session on abortion.

An attorney who was heading Arkansas' Alcoholic Beverage Control Division on an interim basis has been named to the post permanently.

Gov. Asa Hutchinson on Friday named Mary Robin Casteel as the agency's director. Casteel had planned to resign from the agency, but was named last month as its interim director following Bud Roberts' resignation.

Pixabay

SEARCY, Ark. (AP) — Prosecutors say they won't seek the death penalty for a man charged in the death of a Searcy man who disappeared more than 20 years ago.

Brandon Lee Wheeler is charged with capital murder and abuse of a corpse in the death of Jarrod Green.

Police say Green was reported missing in October 1994. A court affidavit says that detectives received information late last year about the possible location of Green's body, and Wheeler was arrested last month in Ohio.

TULSA, Okla. (AP) — Walmart and other major corporations are asking a federal court to dismiss a lawsuit filed against them by the Cherokee Nation, which argues that the companies have not done enough to stop prescription opioid abuse.

The Oklahoma-based tribe filed the lawsuit in April in tribal court. On Thursday, the companies argued in federal court that the case doesn't belong in tribal court and should be dismissed. Along with Walmart, the lawsuit names CVS, Walgreens and major drug distributors in the U.S.

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