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NPR News Coverage

The power outages that followed hurricanes Harvey and Irma are unfortunately a common reality with powerful storms, just as is the fact that the affected people need to eat.

Hurricane diets can consist of a lot of processed, prepackaged food, but with a bit of imagination or preparation, hot meals are possible.

After Hurricane Irma hit Florida, Tara Gatscher and her family returned to their house in Tampa Bay to find that while the house didn't have any terrible damage, they didn't have power.

President Trump is about to make his debut at an institution he has often berated. For the first time, he will attend the annual United Nations General Assembly in New York, which brings together leaders of the 193 member nations for a week of meetings and speeches.

As president-elect, he called the U.N. "just a club for people to get together, talk and have a good time."

But it's a "new day" at the U.N., said U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley.

Updated at 4 a.m. ET Sunday

Police in the U.K. have now arrested two men in connection with the explosion on a train Friday that left dozens injured.

London's Metropolitan Police announced on Sunday morning that they arrested a 21-year-old man in the west London area of Hounslow late on Saturday night.

Earlier on Saturday police made what they said was a "significant arrest" of an 18-year-old man in relation to the investigation.

Ask Luis Garza how the La Raza exhibition came to be at The Autry Museum of the American West, and he raises his palms, eyes heavenward:

"Karma," he says. "Fate. Serendipity. The gods have chosen to align us at this moment in time."

Buckle up! We'll be visiting many U.S. states and territories in our weekly education news roundup.

Florida schools reopening after Irma

Schools all over Florida remained closed this week in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma. Most have targeted this Monday to reopen. The closures affected several hundred thousand students in some of the largest districts in the country, from Miami to Jacksonville.

DeVos' "Rethink School" tour

When he came to the United States 12 years ago, Edgar Velazquez hardly spoke a word of English. Most days of his first year, the 14-year-old Mexican immigrant went to the library after school to read the dictionary, determined to learn 250 words — the minimum for basic conversation.

At home, Velazquez often did his homework in the bathroom. It was the quietest spot in his family's 500 square-foot studio in the Tenderloin, a San Francisco neighborhood with "needles on the ground and a lot of homeless on the streets," he recalls.

Nearly 400,000 Rohingya people have fled government violence in Myanmar and crossed into neighboring Bangladesh. The majority of them are children — 60 percent, by U.N. estimates. And at least 1,100 are separated from their parents.

The challenges for aid groups are unfathomable with a refugee crisis this large, caused by what Zeid Ra'ad Al Hussein, the United Nations high commissioner for human rights, says seems to be "a textbook example of ethnic cleansing."

The situation is even more daunting when so many children are at risk.

Updated at 2 a.m. Saturday

Several hundred people gathered in St. Louis Friday to peacefully protest the acquittal of a police officer who was charged with the murder of a black motorist.

But after the main protest, police say "agitators" threw items including a brick at police. St. Louis police said nine police officers and one Missouri State Highway Patrol trooper were injured. At least two officers who were injured by a brick were transported to a hospital. Police Chief Lawrence O'Toole said 23 people were arrested by 6 p.m.

Two Freedom of Information Act requests are raising questions about President Trump's private Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida: Who stayed there, how much they did they pay and who received the profits?

In one FOIA action, Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington, an advocacy group, requested the visitors log for Mar-a-Lago. Such records would potentially show who met with or accompanied the president from January through March this year.

The Vatican says it has recalled a priest from its diplomatic mission in Washington, D.C., and launched an investigation into allegations of child pornography.

The priest, who has not been named, is currently in Vatican City, according to a statement from the Vatican. It says the U.S. State Department informed Vatican officials on August 21 "of a possible violation of laws relating to child pornography images by a member of the diplomatic corps of the Holy See accredited to Washington."

A recent study out of Philadelphia tracked kindergartners who were learning English and found that four years later there were major discrepancies between which groups of students had mastered the language.

Students whose home language was Spanish were considerably less likely to reach proficiency than any other subgroup. And, on the extreme end, Spanish speakers were almost half as likely as Chinese speakers to cross the proficiency threshold.

Hospital pharmacist Mandy Langston remembers when Lulabelle Berry arrived at the emergency center of Stone County Medical Center in Mountain View, Ark., last year.

Berry couldn't talk. Her face was drooping on one side. Her eyes couldn't focus.

"She was basically unresponsive," Langston recalls.

Just a few years ago, many car dealers and homebuilders were worried that millennials would forever want to be urban hipsters, uninterested in buying cars or homes.

But now, as millennials get older — and richer — more of them are buying SUVs to drive to their suburban homes.

The National Association of Realtors' 2017 Home Buyer and Seller Generational Trends study found that millennials were the largest group of homebuyers for the fourth consecutive year.

Vevo, the music video platform co-owned by the three major labels along with Google's parent company and the Dubai-based Abu Dhabi Media, was the victim of a hack by the prolific group OurMine in the early hours of Friday. The hack was revealed by OurMine in a blog post.

Copyright 2017 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

Copyright 2017 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

Tens of thousands of people write letters or emails to the White House each day. Only a handful make it to the president's desk.

But when someone offers to mow your lawn for free, it gets your attention. Especially when that someone is only 10 years old.

Frank "FX" Giaccio made that offer to the president this summer saying, "I'd like to show the nation what young people like me are ready for."

When the word "bodega" began to trend all over Twitter this week, I wondered whether something bad had happened in one those beloved, big-city neighborhood corner stores.

Systematically paying women less than men. Promoting them more slowly. And denying them opportunities.

These are the allegations in a lawsuit against Google filed Thursday in San Francisco on behalf of three female former employees.

They're seeking class-action status to sue on behalf of all women employed by Google in California over the past four years. "The lawsuit appears to be the first to make class action sex bias claims against Google," according to Reuters.

Can a cat be both a liquid and a solid? Does contact with a crocodile influence a person's willingness to gamble? And do old men really have big ears?

Those are just a few of the questions studied by scientists who received Ig Nobel Prizes at Harvard University on Thursday, at the less-than-prestigious ceremony put on by the otherwise-august institution for the past 27 years.

The federal ethics agency may be opening the door for anonymous donors to pay legal fees for White House staffers.

It could happen just as special counsel Robert Mueller draws closer to the White House in his investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 election and possible collusion with Trump campaign.

Several conservative and pro-Trump groups are said to be considering creating such funds to help White House staffers who may be interviewed by investigators, but who can't afford Washington's high-priced ethics lawyers.

A judge has acquitted former St. Louis police officer Jason Stockley of first-degree murder in the shooting of Anthony Lamar Smith in late 2011. The verdict over Smith's killing has been highly anticipated — and it prompted protests outside the courthouse.

Here's an overview of the case from St. Louis Public Radio:

Washington, D.C., is no stranger to First Amendment demonstrations. But local police will have a heightened challenge this weekend as a trio of rallies will place groups with clashing political views in close proximity on the National Mall.

Four days, 40 nominees — and now, a clear idea of which writers have a shot to win the 2017 National Book Awards.

The National Book Foundation unveiled its longlists of nominees in stages this week, releasing a new set of 10 nominees each day. The rollout concluded Friday with the list of fiction contenders.

Khadija Saddiqi is a soft-voiced, wispy woman. Her clothes and Muslim headscarf are rigorously modest. The only suggestion of her unusual boldness is the bodyguard who stands outside her home in Lahore.

The only evidence of why she might need a guard is the scar near Saddiqi's wrist.

As Saddiqi picked up her 7-year-old sister from school last year, a man lunged at her with a knife, stabbing her in her throat, arms, breasts and back.

"I thought it was the end of my life," says Saddiqi, 22. "I was full of blood."

She knew her attacker well.

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