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Middle East
3:33 pm
Tue November 8, 2011

Disappearances In Lebanon Haunt Syrian Activists

Syria's brutal repression of an anti-government movement that began in March continues — even outside its borders. In neighboring Lebanon, the disappearance of an elderly government critic underscores the long reach of the Syrian regime.

Until recently, 89-year-old Shibli al-Aisamy spent most of his time in the United States. As a founder of the pan-Arab Ba'ath Party in the 1960s, Aisamy had once served as a vice president of Syria. He later broke with then-Syrian President Hafez Assad, the father of the current president, Bashar Assad.

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The Two-Way
3:13 pm
Tue November 8, 2011

Report: Wall Street Bonuses Will Decline 20 To 30 Percent This Year

People walk past the Wall Street bull in New York City.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

After two years of record payouts, Wall Street bonuses will take a hit this year, a new report says. The report finds that on average Wall Street workers will get an end-of-year bonus check worth 20 to 30 percent less than last year.

NBC News reports:

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The Salt
2:56 pm
Tue November 8, 2011

From Grille To Grill: When Roadkill Is Good Enough For Dinner

The thought of eating roadkill is likely to roil your stomach if you're an urbanite picturing a flattened skunk covered in flies.

But what about a perfectly marinated venison tenderloin charring on the grill?

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Around the Nation
2:35 pm
Tue November 8, 2011

In Indiana, Some Buses Stop Shuttling Kids For Free

In Indiana, school buses have been disappearing in large part because districts can no longer rely on a steady funding stream to pay for them.
iStockphoto.com

School buses have been disappearing in Indiana in large part because districts can no longer rely on a steady funding stream to pay for them.

As many as a dozen Indiana districts are threatening to cut back on busing.

In Franklin Township, near Indianapolis, the school district is already charging families monthly fees for their kids to ride the school bus. It can all be traced back to property taxes.

Forced To Cut Transportation

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Law
2:14 pm
Tue November 8, 2011

Justices Weigh Technology And Privacy In GPS Case

The Supreme Court heard arguments in a case about whether GPS monitoring devices like this one may be affixed to suspects' cars without a warrant from a judge.
Yasir Afifi AP

Justices grappled Tuesday with a question that pits the use of modern technology in law enforcement against individual privacy interests. At issue is a case testing whether police must obtain a warrant before putting a GPS tracking device on a car to monitor a suspect's movements.

The Two-Way
2:08 pm
Tue November 8, 2011

U.N. Says Some Of Iran's Work Is 'Specific' To Nuclear Weapons

April 2010: Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad unveils a sample of the third generation centrifuge for uranium enrichment during a ceremony in Tehran on April 9, 2010. Iran says its nuclear ambitions are peaceful.
Behrouz Mehri AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 8, 2011 4:02 pm

In a report (pdf) released today, the International Atomic Energy Agency says it has enough "credible" evidence that Iran has worked and may currently be working on producing nuclear weapons.

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Monkey See
2:03 pm
Tue November 8, 2011

'100 Yards To Glory': What Eli Manning Told Bob Costas About His Pores

Bob Costas, co-author of a new book and DVD set counting down the greatest moments in NFL history.
NBC Universal Photo Bank

On today's All Things Considered, Robert Siegel poses an important question to Bob Costas, one of the authors of a new book about the greatest moments in football: With football so popular and beloved and money-making, why is baseball still considered our national pastime? What does football have to do to get a little love?

"Hey, leave baseball something," Costas says of the special, nostalgic language with which we often speak of it. "In every other measurable way, football has surpassed it."

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Sports
2:00 pm
Tue November 8, 2011

Paterno Cancels Weekly News Conference

Guy Raz speaks with NPR's Mike Pesca about the growing scandal in the Penn State football program. Longtime coach Joe Paterno abruptly canceled his weekly news conference Tuesday, amid reports that members of the school's board are pushing for him to step down.

National Security
2:00 pm
Tue November 8, 2011

Holder Fields Tough Questions From Lawmakers

U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder is sworn in before testifying during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing about the controversial "Fast and Furious" gun-trafficking program on Tuesday.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 8, 2011 9:15 pm

Attorney General Eric Holder spent almost three hours on Capitol Hill on Tuesday, getting a grilling from members of the Senate Judiciary Committee about a flawed gun-trafficking operation that let hundreds of guns flow across the Southwest border.

But even after the Justice Department oversight hearing, Republican lawmakers say there are lots of questions that remain unanswered.

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The Two-Way
1:29 pm
Tue November 8, 2011

Coming Up: Herman Cain Interview

"I can categorically say I have never acted inappropriately with anyone, period," Republican presidential candidate Herman Cain just told ABC News' Jonathan Karl on a live ABC/Yahoo webcast.

Responding to the latest accusation by a woman — Sharon Bialek of Chicago — who says he sexually harassed her in the late 1990s, Cain said the charge is "baseless, bogus and false" and that Bialek is lying.

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NPR Story
1:16 pm
Tue November 8, 2011

Leibovitz Takes A 'Pilgrimage' For Artistic Renewal

In 2000, the Library of Congress declared Annie Leibovitz to be a Living Legend. Leibovitz lives in New York with her three children.
Annie Leibovitz

Originally published on Wed November 9, 2011 10:14 am

From John Lennon curled around Yoko Ono to a pregnant Demi Moore, photographer Annie Leibovitz has made a career of capturing people, often celebrities. But her latest collection is something very different. In Pilgrimage, Leibovitz focuses her lens on places and objects that have special meaning for her.

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The Two-Way
1:04 pm
Tue November 8, 2011

'Superstar Conservative' Judge Writes Opinion Upholding Health Care Law

"An appeals court judge appointed by President Ronald Reagan just wrote an opinion affirming the constitutionality of the federal law overhauling health care," our colleague Scott Hensley writes over at the Shots blog.

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Education
12:40 pm
Tue November 8, 2011

Does New Orleans Welcome Disabled Students?

Noah Fisher, 10, and his full-time aide, Daniel Thomas, at Lafayette Academy, a charter school housed in a former district school building in New Orleans.
Larry Abramson NPR

Originally published on Tue November 15, 2011 6:56 pm

New Orleans has become the center of an education revolution, where more than 70 percent of students attend a charter school.

The number of students taught in traditional district-run schools is shrinking fast. That's because parents in post-Hurricane Katrina can pick and choose from a smorgasbord of schools with different approaches and cultures.

By many measures, this educational marketplace has improved student achievement. But as this experiment moves ahead, it's led to questions about whether the district is truly open to the most challenging students.

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Shots - Health Blog
12:32 pm
Tue November 8, 2011

Conservative Appeals Court Judge Writes Opinion Upholding Health Law

An appeals court judge appointed by President Ronald Reagan just wrote an opinion affirming the constitutionality of the federal law overhauling health care.

That makes three appeals court decisions in favor of the law and one against, if you're keeping track.

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The Two-Way
12:29 pm
Tue November 8, 2011

As Asteroid Approaches, Here's How To Watch It

This radar image of asteroid 2005 YU55 was obtained on Nov. 7 when the space rock was at 3.6 lunar distances, which is about 860,000 miles from Earth.
NASA/JPL-Caltech

As we reported at the end of October, 2005 YU55, an asteroid bigger than an aircraft carrier, is set to have a very close rendezvous with planet Earth. It'll be closer than the moon and today at 6:28 p.m. ET, it will make its closest approach.

Don't worry. NASA is confident it will miss us. Here's a video NASA put together that explains the trajectory and shows an animation:

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The Two-Way
12:03 pm
Tue November 8, 2011

Another Cain Accuser Identified

Karen Kraushaar, a 55-year-old federal employee and registered Republican, has been identified as one of the two women who in the late 1990s settled claims of sexual harassment against 2012 GOP presidential candidate Herman Cain, our colleague Liz Halloran reports on the It's All Politics blog and the NPR Newscast.

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Middle East
12:00 pm
Tue November 8, 2011

Eight Months In, Violence In Syria Continues

The U.N. says more than 3,500 people have died in Syria's eight-month cycle of protests and government crackdowns. Residents of Homs, the third largest city in the country, report fierce fighting as government forces try to regain control of the city.

Remembrances
12:00 pm
Tue November 8, 2011

Bert Sugar Remembers 'Smokin' Joe' Frazier

Former heavyweight champion Joe Frazier died Monday night at the age of 67, just a month after being diagnosed with liver cancer. "Smokin' Joe," as he was called, was known for his powerful left hook that knocked down Muhammad Ali in 1971 at Madison Square Garden.

Law
12:00 pm
Tue November 8, 2011

Supreme Court Hears Arguments In GPS Case

United States vs. Jones raises questions about the limits of police searches, personal privacy and the use of new technology in law enforcement. At issue is whether police need warrants to attach GPS tracking devices to a cars to monitor suspects' movements for indefinite periods of time.

From Our Listeners
12:00 pm
Tue November 8, 2011

Letters: Student Loan Debt And Stay-At-Home Dads

NPR's Neal Conan reads from listener comments on previous show topics, including ways to reduce student loan debt, finding the humor in life as a stay-at-home dad, and what schools teach students about sex.

It's All Politics
11:55 am
Tue November 8, 2011

Earlier Cain Accuser Is Republican, Longtime Government Employee

Republican presidential candidate Herman Cain addressed the Defending the American Dream Summit at the Washington Convention Center Nov. 4. in Washington, DC. He plans to speak about the sexual harassment allegations against him at a news conference Tuesday afternoon.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 8, 2011 6:04 pm

Until now, Karen Kraushaar has been known to many in Washington as "Woman A," one of two employees who settled claims of sexual harassment against Herman Cain more than a decade ago when he headed the National Restaurant Association.

On Tuesday, after another woman went public with her harassment accusation against Cain, Kraushaar's identity was revealed by an iPad news site, The Daily.

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The Two-Way
11:50 am
Tue November 8, 2011

Monster Storm Takes Aim For Alaska

A massive storm brews off the west coast of Alaska.
NOAA

The National Weather Service is predicting a "historic" storm for the west coast of Alaska. Here's how meteorologists described it to the Alaska Dispatch:

"This is going to be one of the worst storms on record over the Bering Sea," said Bob Fischer, lead forecaster with the National Weather Service in Alaska. "Essentially the entire west coast of Alaska is going to see blizzard and winter conditions — heavy snow, poor visibility, high winds."

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It's All Politics
11:31 am
Tue November 8, 2011

Clinton For Veep: Follow The Sources

Would President Obama swap Joe Biden for Hillary Clinton on his 2012 ticket? NPR's Political Junkie Ken Rudin is dubious. "Where this comes from I do not know," he declared in his Monday column dismissing the speculation about any plans to replace Biden.

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Author Interviews
11:24 am
Tue November 8, 2011

James Wolcott: 'Lucking Out' In 1970s New York

Two pedestrians stand on Broadway at West 44th Street in New York's Times Square on a November night in 1976. In his new memoir, critic James Wolcott writes about his life in 1970s New York.
AP

Originally published on Tue November 8, 2011 3:04 pm

When critic James Wolcott was a college sophomore, he wrote an article about Norman Mailer for his student paper. After the article was published, Wolcott found Mailer's address in a copy of Who's Who and mailed him a copy. Mailer wrote back.

"[He said]: 'When you leave college, I'd be willing to write a letter for you to editor Dan Wolf at The Village Voice," recalls Wolcott.

Wolcott knew he couldn't wait the two years until graduation. He wrote back to Mailer.

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Animals
11:01 am
Tue November 8, 2011

How Dogs Evolved Into 'Our Best Friends'

Dogs today evolved from wolves who first developed a relationship with humans on the hunting trail.
iStockphoto.com

Dogs have aided humans for thousands of years. Man's best friend has provided protection, companionship and hunting assistance since the days of the earliest human settlements.

But how and when dogs evolved from wolves is a matter of debate. Naturalist Mark Derr says there are two main schools of thought: Some researchers believe that humans domesticated wolves who were scrounging around their villages for trash. Others think that humans were taking care of wolves from the time they were puppies — until enough puppies were tamed and they somehow then evolved into dogs.

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