NPR News

Pages

NPR Story
3:00 am
Wed December 14, 2011

Holder Vows To Enforce Civil Rights Protections

Originally published on Wed December 14, 2011 6:02 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

Read more
NPR Story
3:00 am
Wed December 14, 2011

Business News

Steve Inskeep has business news.

Afghanistan
3:00 am
Wed December 14, 2011

Defense Secretary Panetta In Afghan Capital Kabul

Originally published on Wed December 14, 2011 6:02 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

Let's get a look, now, at two war-torn countries. One that Americans are leaving, and another that they would like to leave. One is Iraq whereas, we'll hear in a moment, departing U.S. troops leave behind some unresolved conflicts.

Read more
Europe
3:00 am
Wed December 14, 2011

Italian Lawmaker To Debate Strict Austerity Measures

Originally published on Wed December 14, 2011 6:02 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

Read more
Business
3:00 am
Wed December 14, 2011

iNukeBoom Is One Big Boombox

As a publicity stunt, audio company Behringer has come out with an 8-foot wide by 4-foot high iPod docking station. It weighs 700 pounds and costs $30,000.

Chompsgiving To Chew Year's: Holiday Dishes
11:01 pm
Tue December 13, 2011

Christmas Eve, A Feast, Fry Pans And Seven Fishes

There is no set menu for the southern Italian Christmas Eve tradition called the Feast of the Seven Fishes — and no one seems to know why there are seven. Stumped about what to make for your own feast? Here, a dish for stuffed squid submitted as part of this series on holiday food traditions.
iStockphoto.com

The southern Italian Christmas Eve tradition known as the Feast of the Seven Fishes has become a tradition for Italian-American families as well.

Cindy Coddington, who grew up with the traditional meal in her family, remembers the day as a whirlwind of family and fry pans.

"Ours was fried shrimp, fried scallops, pan-fried smelts, calamari cut up in rings and fried. And I'll tell you after the holidays, you really couldn't stand the sight of any more fried food...for a while," Coddington says.

Read more
Around the Nation
11:01 pm
Tue December 13, 2011

When It Comes To Marriage, Many More Say 'I Don't'

Marriage — it's so last century. A new report finds that the share of all U.S. adults who are married has dropped to its lowest on record.
iStockphoto.com

The share of all U.S. adults who are married has dropped to a record low 51 percent, according to a new report. If the trend continues, the institution will soon lose its majority status in American life.

The report being released Wednesday by the Pew Research Center finds new marriages dropped a sharp 5 percent last year, which is very likely related to the bad economy. Pew senior writer D'Vera Cohn says it fits with a larger trend.

Read more
Africa
11:01 pm
Tue December 13, 2011

African Migrants Caught In Brutal Libyan Limbo

A Libyan security guard stands next to African immigrants in the port of Tripoli on Dec. 5, 2011, after authorities foiled their attempt to illegally immigrate to Europe. Thousands of sub-Saharan Africans have been stranded or imprisoned in Libya, suspected of being mercenaries for former Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi.
Mahmud Turkia AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed December 14, 2011 6:02 am

Thousands of sub-Saharan Africans are either stranded or imprisoned in Libya in the wake of the revolt against Moammar Gadhafi — and they haven't been having an easy time. Many have been detained and abused, accused of being mercenaries in Gadhafi's army.

On a recent day at the military airport in Tripoli, the Libyan capital, a Libyan fighter lines up 115 Nigerians to be deported.

More than ready to leave, the women and men gather their meager belongings.

Read more
Business
11:01 pm
Tue December 13, 2011

Kodak Shifts Focus, Zooms In On Commercial Printing

This camera was for sale in Australia when Kodak announced that it would close its Melbourne manufacturing plant in 2004 due to a rise in digital photography. A decline in the sale of digital cameras has caused the company to again shift focus, this time towards commercial printing.
Robert Cianflone Getty Images

Originally published on Wed December 14, 2011 8:42 am

The photography pioneer Kodak has been dogged by bankruptcy rumors, its stock has tumbled, and its cash reserves have shrunk. But the company says it expects a strong fourth quarter as it fights toward profitability in 2012.

"I grew up in a Kodak family — aunts, uncles, father, brother-in-law," says Linda Nau. Her connection to the company is similar to that of a lot of native Rochesterians. Nau herself even worked at Kodak.

Read more
Iraq
11:01 pm
Tue December 13, 2011

Tensions Feared As U.S. Leaves Disputed Iraqi City

Iraqi soldiers take part in a graduation parade in Kirkuk on Monday. The oil-rich city is a mix of Kurds, Arabs, Turkmen and others. Its future status is a source of tension within Iraq.
Marwan Ibrahim AFP/Getty Images

As American troops leave Iraq, the one place in the country that's most likely to erupt into violence, at least in the short term, is the oil-rich city of Kirkuk.

The city is a complicated ethnic mix of Kurds, Arabs, Turkmen and others. The question of whether it belongs to the autonomous Kurdish region in the north or to the Arab-dominated central government of Baghdad has long been a point of contention.

Read more
Asia
11:01 pm
Tue December 13, 2011

And You Thought The Tiger Mother Was Tough

Wolf Dad XiaoBaiyou at home, where he drew up more than a thousand rules for his kids. Any transgression earned the kids a beating with a feather duster, either on the legs or on the palm of the hand.
Louisa Lim NPR

Tiger Mother Amy Chua, the super-strict Chinese-American disciplinarian, became an overnight sensation in the U.S. this year when she wrote about her tough parenting style. But she looks like a pussy cat next to her mainland Chinese equivalent, "Wolf Dad" Xiao Baiyou.

Xiao is the latest media sensation in China — a father who not just beat his son and three daughters, but boasts about how he did it.

Read more
Education
11:01 pm
Tue December 13, 2011

Florida Charter Schools Failing Disabled Students

Tres Whitlock types on the DynaVox tablet that serves as his voice. Whitlock, 17, has cerebral palsy and can't speak on his own. He is trying to enroll in a Hillsborough County charter school, but has yet to enroll because of concerns about the therapy and services he needs.
John O'Connor StateImpact Florida

Originally published on Wed December 14, 2011 11:33 am

Tres Whitlock is stuck in a public school where he feels ignored. He wants out.

The 17-year-old would-be video game designer researched his options online and found his perfect match: Pivot Charter School.

"It's computer-based, and I think I will do better," he says.

But when Whitlock tried to enroll in the school, he found a series of barriers in his way. The reason? He has cerebral palsy, and school officials say they don't have anyone to take Whitlock to the bathroom.

Read more
Newt Gingrich
11:01 pm
Tue December 13, 2011

On The Hill, Gingrich Made Friends And Enemies

Originally published on Wed December 14, 2011 2:59 am

Republican presidential candidate Newt Gingrich is new to his front-runner status, but he's hardly new to Washington.

He has spent decades weaving relationships in and around government — starting with his successful campaign to win the House majority back in the early 1990s. Some of his most ardent supporters now worked with him back then — but some of his angriest opponents did, too.

'He's A Quality Guy'

Read more
Mitt Romney
11:01 pm
Tue December 13, 2011

As Governor, Romney Balanced Budget By Hiking Fees

When it comes to taxes, the field of Republican presidential candidates is unified: Keep them low and certainly don't raise them.

In both his runs for the White House, Mitt Romney has hewed to this Republican line. But whether he cut or actually raised taxes as governor of Massachusetts is a subject for debate.

All politicians like to talk about cutting taxes. But at the state level during tough economic times, many end up cutting spending while raising taxes because they have to balance their budgets.

Read more
Around the Nation
11:01 pm
Tue December 13, 2011

New Gary, Ind., Mayor Has A Big Job Ahead Of Her

Originally published on Wed December 14, 2011 6:02 am

Gary, Ind., is among the most troubled cities in the Midwest, but some residents are starting to feel a bit more optimistic.

That's because they've just elected a new mayor with an Ivy League pedigree and some big ideas. Her name is Karen Freeman-Wilson and when she's sworn in at the beginning of the new year, she'll become the first African-American female mayor in the history of the state of Indiana.

But Freeman-Wilson isn't interested in the symbolism. She says her first job will be to promote Gary.

Read more
Sweetness And Light
9:00 pm
Tue December 13, 2011

Look, Ma, I'm In The End Zone!

Even In Canada: During the CFL's Grey Cup title game in November, Arland Bruce (1) and Andrew Harris of the BC Lions choreographed their moves to celebrate a fourth-quarter touchdown against the Winnipeg Blue Bombers in Vancouver.
Jeff Vinnick Getty Images

Originally published on Wed December 14, 2011 9:39 am

Hear ye, hear ye: The court of public opinion will now come to order in the class-action suit by disturbed football fans against dopey football players who act like imbeciles in the end zone after scoring a touchdown.

Your honor, the plaintiffs call to the stand a man of great taste, good manners and exquisite judgment –– namely, me.

What is this?

Read more
Presidential Race
5:48 pm
Tue December 13, 2011

As Caucuses Loom, Iowans Bemoan Lack of Face Time

Former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum speaks Tuesday at the Lincoln Cafe in Belle Plaine, Iowa. Among GOP candidates, Santorum had the state to himself on Tuesday.
Chris Carlson Associated Press

Originally published on Tue December 13, 2011 10:38 pm

The Iowa caucuses — the first contest of the 2012 presidential nominating season — take place in three weeks. That means there's precious little time for candidates to make their case and close the deal with Hawkeye State Republicans.

But candidates were tough to find in Iowa on Tuesday. Only former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum — a big underdog in the race — was there. In fact, many Iowans note that this year candidates have spent fewer hours in the state than before recent presidential caucuses.

Read more
Living Large: Obesity In America
5:46 pm
Tue December 13, 2011

For Teens, Weight Loss Sculpts New Lives

Located in the North Carolina mountains, Wellspring Academy is a boarding school for overweight teenagers. In addition to their regular classes, students learn to control their weight through a healthful diet, physical activity and counseling.
Travis Dove For NPR

Originally published on Wed August 1, 2012 5:42 pm

Second of two stories, which are part of an ongoing series on obesity in America. The first part begins in August as students start their weight-loss journey at Wellspring Academy, a boarding school in Brevard, N.C. The second checks in with students in late October.

Read more
NPR Story
5:09 pm
Tue December 13, 2011

Why GOP Hopefuls Aren't Spending Time In Iowa

Originally published on Tue December 13, 2011 5:09 pm

With three weeks to go until the Iowa caucuses kick off the Republican nominating contest, the candidates are not registering much of a presence in Iowa.

Three Books...
4:45 pm
Tue December 13, 2011

Fakin' It: Three Books On Masquerading Identities

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue December 13, 2011 6:21 pm

Scratch just a little below the surface of American writing, and you'll find a substratum of stories that revolve around an impostor, a figure at once sinister and fascinating. This charlatan moves fluidly between personae, and in doing so, proves that identity is — especially in America — up for grabs. The impostor thus is everything we insist we are not. But he's also, I think, everything we wish we could be as the inheritors of our open, yet easily manipulated, American culture.

Read more
The Two-Way
4:32 pm
Tue December 13, 2011

VIDEO: 'World's Slowest Fastest Camera' Captures The Movement Of Light

MIT Media Lab postdoc Andreas Velten, left, and Associate Professor Ramesh Raskar. In the foreground is a plastic bottle glowing with laser light.
M. Scott Brauer MIT

Originally published on Tue December 13, 2011 5:08 pm

A camera that captures images at the rate of one trillion exposures per second is a device with amazing potential, according to researchers at MIT. The tradeoffs required to reach that speed also mean its a camera with some real drawbacks.

Read more
Shots - Health Blog
4:06 pm
Tue December 13, 2011

FDA Tells Weight-Loss Surgery Centers To Pull Misleading Ads

Originally published on Wed December 14, 2011 3:54 pm

In an unusual move, the Food and Drug Administration has warned a marketing company and eight surgery centers in Southern California that their billboards and other advertisements touting weight-loss surgery are misleading because they don't adequately describe the risks from the procedure.

The agency's letters ask the surgery centers and the marketing firm 1-800-GET-THIN to pull the allegedly misleading advertising.

Read more
The Two-Way
3:45 pm
Tue December 13, 2011

Biden: Iraq Will Be A Partner; History Will Judge If War Was Worth It

Vice President Joe Biden is interviewed by NPR's Robert Siegel in the Secretary of War Suite of the Eisenhower Executive Office Building, Dec. 13.
David Lienemann The White House

Originally published on Tue December 13, 2011 6:49 pm

Saying that the U.S. is not looking for Iraq to be an ally, Vice President Biden told NPR's Robert Siegel this afternoon that the U.S. now views that country as a partner.

"We're looking for a stable, democratic government that is not beholden to anyone in the region and is able to be secure within its own borders and have its own policy ," he said during an interview in Washington's Eisenhower Executive Office Building, adjacent to the White House.

Read more
Iraq
3:39 pm
Tue December 13, 2011

U.S. Troops (But Not Their TVs) Prepare To Leave Iraq

A day after leaving Iraq last week, U.S. Army soldiers from the 1st Cavalry Division lined up their armored vehicles near Kuwait City, Kuwait. Armored equipment will not stay behind after troops leave Iraq, but other property may.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Thu December 15, 2011 8:34 am

The final American troops are set to leave Iraq in a matter of days. Just a few thousand remain, and they will be heading south toward Kuwait — the starting point for a war that began nearly nine years ago.

The last American military unit out of Iraq will be part of the 1st Cavalry Division from Fort Hood, Texas. The division fought in some of the war's toughest battles and suffered nearly 300 killed.

Read more
Music
3:22 pm
Tue December 13, 2011

Schubert's 'Winterreise' Paints Bleak Landscape For Bill T. Jones

Choreographer Bill T. Jones at an appearance earlier this year.
Frederick M. Brown Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 21, 2014 6:55 pm

As snowstorms hit the country today, All Things Considered revisits a vivid story that choreographer and dancer Bill T. Jones shared about one winter song. It originally aired Dec. 13, 2011.

Read more

Pages