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The Salt
11:01 pm
Sun February 5, 2012

California's Stevia Growers Bet On Fast Track To Sweetener Success

The S&W Seed Co., in Five Points, Calif., will grow these seedlings of zero-calorie stevia in the fields of California's Central Valley.
Dan Charles NPR

Originally published on Mon February 6, 2012 2:23 am

It's stevia time!

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Shots - Health Blog
11:01 pm
Sun February 5, 2012

What Spermicide Users Should Know, But Often Don't

Many over-the-counter contraceptives contain a spermicide known as nonoxynol-9.
Gretchen Cuda Kroen For NPR

When Lisa Rentz decided she'd had enough of birth control pills, she walked into her local drug store and picked up something different: a vaginal contraceptive film that contains the spermicide nonoxynol-9, or n-9.

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Shots - Health Blog
11:01 pm
Sun February 5, 2012

The 'Morning After' Pill: How It Works And Who Uses It

Plan B is available over the counter for people 17 and older.
AP

Originally published on Thu February 14, 2013 10:52 am

Access to emergency contraception has swirled at the center of a recent flurry of debate over insurance coverage. It's a pill women can take if their birth control fails or they forget to use it.

The most popular brand of emergency contraception is called "Plan B One-Step." You might better know it as the morning-after pill. Today, about 10 percent of sexually active women say they've used it.

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Your Money
11:01 pm
Sun February 5, 2012

In Idaho, Two Workers Take Jobs, And Hope For Best

When he was laid off in 2008., Nathan Bussey had been working for Hewlett-Packard for just under 10 years. He's now hoping to advance in his new job at a call center.
Molly Messick StateImpact Idaho

Originally published on Mon February 6, 2012 12:11 pm

StateImpact Idaho's Molly Messick reports on two people coping with the lingering effects of an economic downturn.

Before the recession, Idaho had one of the fastest growing economies in the country. But last year, its jobless rate peaked at nearly 10 percent. That number has begun to creep downward – but many workers in the state are still struggling to replace the jobs they've lost.

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Music Interviews
11:01 pm
Sun February 5, 2012

Songs To Spin To, From A Fitness Guru

For gymgoers, the right soundtrack can be a critical part of an effective workout.
Arthur Tilley Getty Images

For the latest installment of The Ultimate NPR Workout Mix, Morning Edition reached out to someone who makes workout mixes for a living.

Justin Rubin teaches spin classes at Equinox Fitness in Los Angeles, where dozens of riders fill a dark room, pedaling against varying resistance levels on stationary bikes. Riders reserve their bikes online 26 hours before a class, and the bikes for Rubin's class are gone within minutes. The key to his popularity: People love his music.

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Sports
5:49 pm
Sun February 5, 2012

Photos: Super Bowl XLVI

Eli Manning of the New York Giants hoists the Vince Lombardi Trophy after defeating the New England Patriots in Super Bowl XLVI.
Photo by Al Bello Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 10:02 am

The New England Patriots have kicked off to the New York Giants to begin the Super Bowl.

Economy
4:39 pm
Sun February 5, 2012

Stopping The 'Brain Drain' Of The U.S. Economy

Recent surveys show that a large percentage of graduates from the nation's top schools are taking jobs in consulting or financial sector.
Mary Altaffer AP

Yale University student Marina Keegan received an email last May from Bridgewater Associates, one of the world's largest hedge funds, offering her $100 if she said why she didn't apply for a summer internship.

Keegan, an English major, decided to take Bridgewater up on its offer.

"It was only sort of once I was inside the room when I realized ... maybe I'm helping them perfect their recruiting machine, which is exactly what we were doing," Keegan tells weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz.

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Music
4:00 pm
Sun February 5, 2012

New Staging Of 'Yentl' Tells A Transgender Girl's Story

Actress Hillary Clemens portrays Yentl/Anshel in the new staging of Isaac Bashevis Singer's play at the Asolo Repertory Theatre in Sarasota, Fla.
Daniel Perales Studio

Singer-songwriter Jill Sobule is probably best known for her 1995 hit single, "I Kissed a Girl." These days, she's taking on a new musical project: the gender-bending play by Isaac Bashevis Singer, Yentl.

Barbra Streisand turned Singer's play into her 1984 hit movie musical of the same name. Although Sobule's version features music, it's a little more Singer and a little less Streisand.

"She changed the ending and made it kind of Funny Girl coming to America. ... We keep to the word," Sobule tells weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz.

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Health
2:56 pm
Sun February 5, 2012

Fewer Autopsies Mean Crucial Info Goes To The Grave

Colleagues of Renee Royak-Schaler at the University of Maryland School of Medicine paid for and conducted an autopsy that revealed that cancer had ravaged her body. Today, autopsies are conducted on just 5 percent of patients.
Jenna Isaacson Pfueller ProPublica

Originally published on Tue May 8, 2012 2:52 pm

A half-century ago, autopsies — sometimes called the ultimate medical audit — were an integral part of American health care, performed on roughly half of all patients who died in hospitals. But today, autopsies are conducted on roughly 5 percent of such patients, and experts say that is a troubling trend.

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Author Interviews
2:10 pm
Sun February 5, 2012

How Whitey Bulger Corrupted The Justice System

These 1984 file photos originally released by the FBI show New England organized crime figure James "Whitey" Bulger.
Federal Bureau of Investigation, File AP

Originally published on Mon February 6, 2012 12:32 pm

When Whitey Bulger was captured last year, he'd spent close to 20 years on the run — and on the FBI's Most Wanted list.

Bulger was the head of an Irish gang terrorizing the streets of South Boston. The Massachusetts State Police wanted him gone, but curiously couldn't touch him.

Why? Bulger was a confidential FBI informant, and the bureau shielded him for years.

Robert Fitzpatrick, the author of Betrayal: Whitey Bulger and the FBI Agent Who Fought to Bring Him Down, says Bulger was widely known to be an unsavory character.

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The Two-Way
11:09 am
Sun February 5, 2012

Russia's Hottest Protest Song, Courtesy Of The Military Elite

A screen grab from the YouTube video, "Putin and the Paratroopers."
YouTube

An Internet hit is becoming the anthem for Russian protesters as they march against Vladimir Putin's rule.

In the few days since it was posted, more than 1 million people have watched the YouTube video for the song, catapulting its band into sudden stardom. Yet this is no ordinary story of the latest Web sensation.

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Middle East
9:21 am
Sun February 5, 2012

Egypt To Try 19 Americans Over NGO Funding

Egyptian official media reported Sunday that 40 people, including at least 19 Americans, have been referred to trial on charges they illegally provided foreign funding to non-governmental organizations in the country.

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Middle East
7:00 am
Sun February 5, 2012

Syria Veto 'Outrageous' Says U.N. Envoy Susan Rice

United States Ambassador to the United Nations Susan Rice spoke after the Security Council vote on Saturday, saying the United States was "disgusted" by Russia and China's veto.
Mary Altaffer AP

Originally published on Sun February 5, 2012 2:53 pm

For nearly a year, Syria's government has sustained a violent crackdown against opposition protesters. The international community has struggled to agree on a unified response, and on Saturday, the latest effort to bring pressure on Syria's leaders fell apart.

Russia and China blocked a U.N. Security Council resolution that would have condemned the Syrian government for attacks against civilians. U.S. Ambassador Susan Rice said the United States was "disgusted" by the double veto.

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Presidential Race
7:00 am
Sun February 5, 2012

Curtain Rises On Colorado Caucuses

Colorado holds its Republican caucuses on Tuesday. Mitt Romney, Rick Santorum and Ron Paul have focused their attention there recently. The state will also be a key battleground in the general election contest. From Denver, Kirk Siegler of member station KUNC reports.

Sports
7:00 am
Sun February 5, 2012

On Defense, Neither Super Bowl Team Wins

In football, defense wins championships, or so the saying goes. That hasn't been true recently. In fact, both teams in Sunday's Super Bowl, the Giants and the Patriots, featured less-than-stout defenses through the season. NPR's Mike Pesca has some possible reasons why.

Presidential Race
7:00 am
Sun February 5, 2012

Support, Protest And Hiccups During The Nev. Caucus

Mitt Romney was the big winner in Saturday's Nevada caucus, leaving runner-up Newt Gingrich in the dust. Organizers said tens of thousands of people participated in the West's first presidential contest of the year, and some of them were still taking part late into the night. NPR's Carrie Kahn reports.

Presidential Race
7:00 am
Sun February 5, 2012

Voting Their Own Way: Maine's Extra-Long Caucuses

Originally published on Sun February 5, 2012 12:27 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Europe
7:00 am
Sun February 5, 2012

Greece: Partial Agreement Reached With Creditors

The moment of truth has arrived for Greece. Sunday the government must finally reach agreement on the terms of a $170-billion bailout from the so-called troika: the European Commission, the European Central Bank and the International Monetary Fund. John Psaropoulos reports from Athens.

Middle East
7:00 am
Sun February 5, 2012

Violence Rises In Syria As UN Falters

For nearly a year, Syria's government has sustained a violent crackdown against opposition protesters. The international community has struggled to agree on a unified response, and on Saturday, the latest effort to bring pressure on Syria's leaders fell apart. Host Rachel Martin talks with NPR's Kelly McEvers, who is monitoring developments in Syria.

Sports
5:11 am
Sun February 5, 2012

Why Do Laymen Love The Giants? It's All Psychology

New York Giants quarterback Eli Manning warms up before the NFC championship game against the San Francisco 49ers last month in the City by the Bay. Oddsmakers have their money on Manning and his Giants to once again prevail over the Patriots on Sunday. But is that prediction based more on psychology than facts?
Julie Jacobson AP

The Super Bowl: an annualized marketing event-cum-gambling extravaganza. That they have to play a football game to justify the ads, gambling and Ines Sainz's career is still in the official rule book somewhere, but that rule book is now sponsored by the Gatorade G2 series. Why does Gatorade have more series than Telemundo?

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Religion
5:10 am
Sun February 5, 2012

Worshipers Kicked Out Of N.Y. School On Principle

Parishioner James Hall of Grace Fellowship Church, which meets at PS-150 in Queens, N.Y.
Fred Mogul

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 10:03 am

For years, small churches have been meeting in New York City public schools. Some want cheap rental space, and others are part of a "church planting" movement. The idea is to "plant" congregations, often in unconventional settings, to attract the unaffiliated.

A federal court last year ruled that these school gatherings violate the separation of church and state. The congregations now have one week left to vacate.

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Europe
5:10 am
Sun February 5, 2012

For Reporter, Cruise Ship Disaster Is A Local Story

The Costa Concordia cruise ship remains half-submerged three weeks after it crashed. It continues to be a source of anger for local residents.
Sylvia Poggioli NPR

Originally published on Sun February 5, 2012 5:49 pm

It rarely happens to a reporter that a major story breaks in her own neighborhood. And well, it's not really a neighborhood, but the Tuscan archipelago, where a cruise ship crashed last month. It's an area I know very well.

I spend summers there, and just last August I was boating a few yards from Le Scole, a rocky reef near Giglio island that is the scene of the disaster.

For the past three weeks, the half-submerged Costa Concordia has dominated the landscape of Giglio and looms ominously over the island's future as a haven for nature lovers and scuba divers.

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Presidential Race
5:09 am
Sun February 5, 2012

Romney Vows To Take Nevada's Vote To Washington

Republican presidential hopeful Mitt Romney won the Nevada caucus Saturday, maintaining strong front-runner status in the race to the nomination.
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun February 5, 2012 12:27 pm

There was no 11th-hour surprise in the Nevada caucuses Saturday night. The first state in the West to vote in the Republican presidential race chose Mitt Romney, who won with support from a broad base and left his rivals trailing behind.

No Thanks To You, Mr. President

Nevada has been Romney country since at least 2008. That year, he took about half the vote in the caucuses but lost the Republican nomination to John McCain.

This year, he has his sights set higher.

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Europe
5:08 am
Sun February 5, 2012

Employed But Not Paid, Some Greeks Voice Protest

ALTER's newsroom no longer operates as part of the strike. Instead, the unpaid staff is broadcasting messages demanding their pay and accusing the company's owner of defrauding them.
Joanna Kakissis NPR

The number of Greeks who are out of work has doubled in the last two years, as Greece has suffered its worst debt crisis in recent memory and a crippling recession. But the economy is so bad that even Greeks with jobs haven't been paid for months. It's a widespread problem that's left thousands in a desperate limbo.

One is Dimitris Perakis, the foreign news editor at ALTER Channel, a small private television station in Athens. He's 37 and has worked at the station for 15 years — his entire career in journalism.

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It's All Politics
1:00 am
Sun February 5, 2012

Move Over, Iowa, Nevada Has A Caucus Problem Too

Jan White, left, Brenda Robertson, center, and Janet Freixas, right, count paper ballots at the headquarters of the Douglas County Republican Party Saturday in Minden, Nev., following county-wide Nevada caucus meetings.
Ted S. Warren AP

Originally published on Mon February 6, 2012 7:35 am

Imagine this: You're the Super Bowl host city, and you've gone to a lot of trouble to get the big game in your town. Now everyone's watching as the game comes to an end, and you can't get the scoreboard to work. Suddenly no one's sure who's ahead or how much time is left to play.

That nightmare scenario probably could not happen. But we have seen some highly improbable events lately that embarrassed the host states in the presidential nominating process.

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