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Post Mortem: Death Investigation In America
3:06 pm
Mon March 5, 2012

Free, But Not Cleared: Ernie Lopez Comes Home

Ernie Lopez hugs his daughter, Nikki Lopez, for the first time since 2009. Ernie was released from prison on March 2 in Amarillo, Texas, after nine years, while he awaits a new trial.
Katie Hayes Luke Katie Hayes Luke for NPR

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:58 am

Ernie Lopez calls it his "rebirth." After spending nearly nine years in prison for the sexual assault of a 6-month old girl, a top Texas court threw out the conviction. And on Friday, the 41-year-old Lopez walked out of the detention center in Amarillo, Texas, where family and friends were waiting.

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Music Reviews
2:54 pm
Mon March 5, 2012

Bruce Springsteen's Hard-Bitten Pop Optimism

Bruce Springsteen's 17th album, Wrecking Ball, has a little taste of almost every style he's ever played, including classic E Street rock 'n' roll.
Danny Clinch

Originally published on Mon March 5, 2012 5:02 pm

Ever since The Rising in 2002 — and arguably since 1984's Born in the U.S.A.Bruce Springsteen releases have functioned as State of the Union addresses as much as pop LPs. Wrecking Ball does, too, beginning with its Occupy-era lead single "We Take Care of Our Own," an anthemic bit of wishful thinking which, like "Born in the U.S.A.," seems easy to misinterpret by 180 degrees if you don't pay attention to the verses between the chorus.

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The Salt
2:38 pm
Mon March 5, 2012

Sustainable Sushi: See The Video. But Don't Eat The Eel

Odds are the local sushi joint's fish is less than sustainable.
Matteo De Stefano IStockPhoto.com

Sushi seems like the perfect modern food: Light, healthful and available at seemingly every supermarket in the nation. But is it sustainable?

That's the question behind "The Story of Sushi," a new video that's been pulling a lot of clicks in the past week. Maybe that's because its adorable format, with tiny, handcrafted figures used to tell the tale, stands in stark contrast to its depressing message: Most of the sushi we snarf up is harvested using unsustainable methods.

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It's All Politics
2:04 pm
Mon March 5, 2012

New Yorker Cover Puts New Twist On Old Romney Shaggy Dog Story

New Yorker cover

Robert Staake, the cover artist for the New Yorker's March 12 cover took a story that's an oldie but goodie — Mitt Romney strapping the kennel containing Seamus the family dog atop the family car during a vacation road trip — and gave it a new spin with Rick Santorum filling in for the dog.

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News
2:00 pm
Mon March 5, 2012

Holder Addresses Killing Of American Terrorism Suspects

Attorney General Eric Holder spoke in Chicago on Monday on the legal rationales for targeting and killing Americans suspected of terrorism overseas. Carrie Johnson talks to Melissa Block.

The Two-Way
1:45 pm
Mon March 5, 2012

In Egypt These Days, Lying About A Nose Job Can Bring A Politician Down

Originally published on Mon March 5, 2012 1:49 pm

It was more than 30 years before Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak lost his grip on power, though many of his people had long suffered under his oppressive regime.

It took less than a week for "a newly minted ultra-conservative Islamist member" of the post-Mubarak parliament in Egypt to be forced to resign because he lied about getting a nose job.

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The Two-Way
1:37 pm
Mon March 5, 2012

E.U. Mulls Mandatory Quotas To Close Gender Gap At Executive Level

European Commissioner for Justice, Fundamental Rights and Citizenship Viviane Reding addresses the media at the European Commission headquarters in Brussels on Monday.
Yves Logghe AP

The European Union's justice commissioner says companies have not done enough voluntarily to narrow the gender gap at the top of publicly traded European firms.

Viviane Reding said self regulation has not worked, so it may be time to consider quotas.

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The Two-Way
1:15 pm
Mon March 5, 2012

Report: 'McCain To Call For Air Strikes On Syria'

Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., will later today become the first senator to call for U.S.-led air strikes on the forces of Syrian President Bashar Assad, Foreign Policy magazine's The Cable blog reports:

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Education
1:02 pm
Mon March 5, 2012

Schools Get Tough With Third-Graders: Read Or Flunk

A student reads at a public elementary charter school in New York City. Educators like to say third grade is when students go from learning to read, to reading to learn.
Chris Hondros Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 5, 2012 5:36 pm

There's little dispute among educators that kids are not reading as well as they should be, but there's endless debate over what to do about it. Now, a growing number of states are taking a hard-line approach through mandatory retentions — meaning third-graders who can't read at grade level will automatically get held back.

To those pushing the idea, it's equal doses of tough and love: You are not doing kids any favors, they say, by waiving them on to fourth grade if they aren't up to snuff on their reading.

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It's All Politics
12:56 pm
Mon March 5, 2012

Pollster: Romney Surges Despite OH GOP Voters Sharing Santorum's Views

Mitt Romney greets supporters in Youngstown, Ohio, Monday, March 5, 2012.
Gerald Herbert AP

Suffolk University has a new poll out of Ohio that reminds us that in politics as in life, timing is everything; Rick Santorum would have been much better off if Super Tuesday had been two weeks ago.

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The Two-Way
12:42 pm
Mon March 5, 2012

Toola, An Otter Pioneer Who Raised Orphan Pups, Has Died

Toola, the southern sea otter, with a surrogate pup.
Randy Wilder Monterey Bay Aquarium

Originally published on Mon March 5, 2012 12:50 pm

Toola may not be a household name, but she made quite an impression on the staff of the Monterey Bay Aquarium, where she lived most of her adult life.

Just look at how Dr. Mike Murray, an aquarium veterinarian, described the sea otter:

"I will argue that there is no other single sea otter that had a greater impact upon the sea otter species, the sea otter programs worldwide, and upon the interface between the sea otters' scientific community and the public."

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The Two-Way
12:20 pm
Mon March 5, 2012

Should NFL's Gregg Williams Be Banned, Fined Or Pardoned For Bounties?

Gregg Williams, then the defensive coordinator for the New Orleans Saints, in August 2010.
Chris Graythen Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 5, 2012 12:22 pm

Gregg Williams, who has spent time as an assistant or head coach at six NFL teams, is meeting with league investigators today to talk about what he's admitted was "a bounty pool of up to $50,000 over the last three seasons that rewarded players with thousand-dollar payoffs for knocking targeted opponents out of games while he was the New Orleans Saints' defensive coordinator," The Associated Press reports.

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NPR Story
12:00 pm
Mon March 5, 2012

Teller Talks: Magicians Use Science To Trick You

Penn & Teller, performing at the Rio in Las Vegas in 2008.
Courtesy of Penn & Teller

On stage, Teller, half of the magician team of Penn & Teller, rarely says a word.

But now he's talking, explaining how magicians harness scientific research on deception to trick audiences into falling for their illusions. And their work, in turn, makes them interesting to brain researchers.

Politics
12:00 pm
Mon March 5, 2012

Our Brains, Betrayed By Political Flip-Flops

The human brain craves predictability, according to neuroscientists, and when politicians appear to flip-flop, our brains don't like it. Often, we feel betrayed. NPR science correspondents Jon Hamilton, Alix Spiegel and Shankar Vedantam talk about why we're hard-wired to appreciate consistency.

Opinion
12:00 pm
Mon March 5, 2012

Op-Ed: The Catholic Church Is Not For Women

Originally published on Mon March 5, 2012 1:33 pm

Transcript

JOHN DONVAN, HOST:

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World
12:00 pm
Mon March 5, 2012

Women's Rights In The Age Of The Arab Spring

Popular movements during the Arab Spring paved the way for democratic elections in Egypt and Tunisia. In Egypt, Islamists are assuming powerful roles. Many women's rights activists fear that a shift toward democratically-elected Islamist rulers will limit personal and political freedom for women.

The Salt
11:33 am
Mon March 5, 2012

Raw Milk Proponents Don't Trust Health Officials

Raw milk lovers trust the stuff that comes straight from the cow more than they trust the FDA.
iStockPhoto.com

You'd think that scary numbers from the big dogs in infectious disease would be enough to make raw milk drinkers reconsider that choice.

But don't count on it. Just 7 percent of raw milk consumers say they trust health officials' recommendations on what foods are safe to eat, according to a new study.

That means that 93 percent of those folks aren't convinced when health officials say that raw milk products can cause diseases like bovine tuberculosis, Q-fever, and brucellosis, as well as more common food-borne illnesses like Listeria and Salmonella.

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Music Reviews
11:27 am
Mon March 5, 2012

Dierks Bentley's 'Home' Is Full Of Country Struggles

Courtesy of the artist

Dierks Bentley has a nice, deep voice; an open, friendly demeanor; and a knack for working in a variety of country-music genres, from bluegrass to power ballads. For all that, it's always been difficult to pin down what Bentley aims to do. Although he's only in his 30s, Bentley sounds as though he's working through a bit of a midlife crisis on his new album Home. Take, for example, the single "Am I the Only One," a novelty tune about going out to party with a twist — not many of Bentley's pals want to join him, because they've settled into adulthood, and he hasn't.

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The Two-Way
11:14 am
Mon March 5, 2012

Venezuela's Hugo Chávez Says Tumor Is Cancerous

Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez speaking during a TV program in Havana on March 4.
AFP/Getty Images

Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez said that the tumor removed by Cuban doctors last week was found to be cancerous.

In remarks televised on Sunday, Chávez also denied rumors that that the cancer had spread to other parts of his body. Bloomberg reports:

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Around the Nation
11:00 am
Mon March 5, 2012

Blacks, Latinos Mark Civil Rights Milestone

Originally published on Mon March 5, 2012 10:44 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News.

Coming up, some advocates for more expansive reproductive rights say women are being disrespected and demeaned by state and national debates about access to abortion and contraception, particularly those debates that include few, if any women. We are going to hear from a female state lawmaker who has flipped the script and crafted legislation focused on the reproductive choices of men. We'll have that conversation in a few minutes.

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Health
11:00 am
Mon March 5, 2012

Georgia Lawmaker: Women's Voices Not Being Heard

Originally published on Mon March 5, 2012 10:44 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE, from NPR News. Coming up, you've heard the phrase: A mind is terrible thing to waste. That's the longtime slogan of a group that worked to get more African-Americans into college. Well, now a group is saying: Ice time is a terrible thing to waste. There's a new scholarship to try to get more college students of color into hockey. We'll hear more about that in just a few minutes.

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Author Interviews
10:43 am
Mon March 5, 2012

Habits: How They Form And How To Break Them

Routines are made up of a three-part "habit loop": a cue, a behavior and a reward. Understanding and interrupting that loop is key to breaking a habit, says journalist Charles Duhigg.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon March 5, 2012 12:46 pm

Think about something it took you a really long time to learn, like how to parallel park. At first, parallel parking was difficult and you had to devote a lot of mental energy to it. But after you grew comfortable with parallel parking, it became much easier — almost habitual, you could say.

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The Two-Way
10:35 am
Mon March 5, 2012

U.S., Israel Stand Together On Iran Issue, Obama And Netanyahu Say

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu looked on as President Obama spoke this morning in the Oval Office of the White House.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun March 11, 2012 8:05 am

With Iran and its nuclear program looming over the discussions, President Obama said this morning that "the United States will always have Israel's back." The president's comment came with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who is at the White House for talks today, by his side.

For his part, Netanyahu told reporters that the U.S. and Israel stand together on policy toward Iran, The Associated Press reports.

The two leaders just held something of a photo op. Other reports on what they had to say:

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Media
10:03 am
Mon March 5, 2012

4 Survival Strategies For Struggling Newspapers

A new study suggests ways newspapers can survive in the digital world. Here dead-tree versions of front pages from around the country announce the death of Osama bin Laden in front of the Newseum in Washington on May 2, 2011.
Kevin Dietsch UPI /Landov

Originally published on Mon March 5, 2012 11:42 am

Newspapers are dying, right?

You probably think so because, for one thing, you're not reading this in a newspaper.

It'd be a reasonable thought. Newspaper readers gradually have been stopping their subscriptions for many years. And the Internet (NPR.org, too) has steadily stolen readers and advertising revenue for the past decade.

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The Two-Way
9:37 am
Mon March 5, 2012

Obama To Hold News Conference Tuesday

With lots of topics to choose from, including the economy, the 2012 presidential race, Syria, Iran's nuclear ambitions and his meetings today with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, there will be plenty to ask President Obama about Tuesday afternoon when he holds a just-announced news conference.

No word yet on the exact time.

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