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Jonesboro City Council looks over 2018 proposed budget

Jonesboro Mayor Harold Perrin says the key to Jonesboro’s success in the future lies in how it can attract more people to not only come to the city, but decide to stay. Perrin says some of next year’s budget has specific items that will address quality of life issues, such as this example from the city’s Parks and Recreation budget. “We had four tournaments that were rained out this year and that means that $70,000 in sales tax revenue has been lost because we couldn’t hold those tournaments,...

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Music & Arts Connection

(From left) No Time Flatt — Becky Weaver, Patrick Cupples, Kevin Wright, Kevin Keen and Steve Moore.
Arkansas State University

KASU Bluegrass Monday: No Time Flatt

JONESBORO – The band No Time Flatt will perform a concert of bluegrass music Monday, Nov. 27, at 7 p.m. at the Collins Theatre, 120 West Emerson Street, in downtown Paragould. The concert is part of the Bluegrass Monday concert series presented by KASU 91.9 FM, the 100,000-watt public broadcasting service of Arkansas State University. Formed in 2015, No Time Flatt has quickly assembled a large group of devoted fans known as “Flattheads.” Based in West Tennessee, this band released its first...

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NPR Connection

'Butcher Of Bosnia' Ratko Mladic Guilty Of Genocide, Crimes Against Humanity

Updated at 8 a.m. ET After a 5 1/2-year trial, the former Bosnian Serb military commander blamed for orchestrating the murders of thousands of ethnic Muslims has learned his own fate. On Wednesday morning, judges at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia in The Hague handed down a guilty verdict for one count of genocide, five counts of crimes against humanity and four counts of violations of the laws or customs of war, out of the 11 counts against 74-year-old Ratko...

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Some major changes may be coming to how the U.S. government collects data about the country's racial and ethnic makeup.

The Trump administration has been considering proposals to ask about race and ethnicity in a radical new way on the 2020 Census and other surveys that follow standards set by the White House.

"Do Indians celebrate Thanksgiving?"

I am asked this question at least once every fall. Which, by the way, is too many times.

The answer is that my family (though I can't speak for the other 5 million Indigenous people in America) doesn't. Not the "brave-pilgrims-and-friendly-savages" version of the holiday, anyway. Twenty or 30 of us might gather under the same roof to share a meal. We'll thank the creator for our blessings.

But that could be true of any Thursday night in a Wampanoag house.

Republicans have been selling their tax overhaul plan as a major booster for the U.S. economy. In fact, they have argued that it would grow the economy so much that cuts would largely pay for themselves.

But on both counts, top economists are doubtful.

In a new poll from the University of Chicago's Booth School of Business, 38 economists from schools including Yale, MIT and the University of California-Berkeley weighed in on contentious points about the GOP tax plans.

This year, even more than last year, people are dreading talking politics over Thanksgiving dinner. A new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll finds that 58 percent of people celebrating the holiday are not excited about the prospect — and Democrats are less excited than Republicans.

Adult Siblings Can Make Our Lives Healthier And Happier

Nov 23, 2017

We'll have a total of just 10 at our Thanksgiving this year, with the biggest absence being that of my mother, who died in March at the age of 92. Our 2-year-old granddaughter and her parents won't be there, either, nor will my nephew and his 6-month-old son, so we'll have no children around to temper the loss. Instead, we'll have to get our yuks from the antics of our daughter's 90-pound dog, Huxley.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep with one more benefit of joining the navy. Sailors no longer have to be pepper sprayed every three years.

NOEL KING, HOST:

Wait a minute, you mean they have been pepper sprayed?

D.R.E.A.M.: Dogs Rule Everything Around Me

Nov 23, 2017

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NOEL KING, HOST:

The way Brenda Bracey tells the story, it's just short of a miracle.

"Twenty-three years," she says. "This is the first Thanksgiving in 23 years that I have not worked at least an eight-hour shift."

For almost a quarter-century, Bracey has been working at grocery stores in the town of Largo, on Florida's west coast. She's done all different jobs, she says, her voice bubbly over the phone line.

Copyright 2017 KUT 90.5. To see more, visit KUT 90.5.

NOEL KING, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

China is claiming a larger role for itself in world affairs. China's president, Xi Jinping, talked last month of making his country a powerful nation that could lead the world.

NOEL KING, HOST:

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KASU Listeners' Trending Stories

New Arkansas Industrial Wood Pellet Mill Raises Green Stakes

More than 150 wood pellet manufacturing mills operate across the U.S., many supplying the domestic woodstove pellet market with home heating fuel. More than a quarter are industrial pellet mills, grinding thousands of acres of forest into biomass for overseas export to electrical utilities stoking retrofitted coal-fire furnaces with "densified" wood. The largest mills, concentrated in the southeastern U.S., claim to sustainably harvest timber, from both hardwood and softwood forests. But a new mill, Highland Pellets in Pine Bluff, which harvests only fast-growing Southern softwood pine may be among the greenest. Still, the calculated ecological costs and benefits of forest biomass remain hazy.

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