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9 Of Those Killed In Duck Boat Capsizing Were Related

Updated at 5:25 p.m. ET Seventeen people are dead after an amphibious tourist boat carrying 31 people capsized and sank Thursday during a severe squall in a lake in southern Missouri. The Ride the Ducks Branson boat sank on Table Rock Lake near the resort town of Branson on Thursday. Divers worked through the night on rescue and recovery operations. On Friday morning, the county sheriff told reporters that all the bodies had been found, bringing the death toll to 17. The Associated Press...

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Greene County Residents Encouraged to Get Hep A Vaccine

Little Rock, Ark. – The Arkansas Department of Health (ADH) recommends all Greene County residents that are 19-60 years of age get vaccinated for hepatitis A (hep A). Mass hep A vaccination clinics will be held July 26-27, 2018 from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. at the Greene County Health Unit at 801 Goldsmith Rd. and Eastside Baptist Church at 529 East Court Street, both in Paragould. Patients should bring their insurance card and driver’s license if they have them. If they don’t have insurance, or if...

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Traveling Arkansas: Juicy peaches in Clarksville

Arkansas Department of Parks and Tourism Travel Writer Kim Williams talks about the following events happening in Arkansas during the weekend of July 19!

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Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

The cows were silent on a recent July morning at Mill-King dairy farm in McGregor, Texas. They stood under shade trees, digesting their breakfast, while cicadas buzzed in the branches overhead.

"It's starting to warm up, so they're starting to get a little bit less ... frolicky," says Craig Miller, watching from the fence line.

His grandfather started this farm. Now he runs it, producing nonhomogenized milk from a mostly grass-fed herd. He says this cow behavior is exactly what he expects as the temperature rises.

A storm rolls in over the Blackfeet Indian Reservation in Montana. The clouds are low and dark as distant lightning cracks over a green prairie. Wade Running Crane is starting to get wet.

"This is like a sign from Ashley that she's here," he says of his family friend Ashley Loring.

Ashley's mother, Loxie Loring, is standing next to him.

"She liked this kind of weather," she says. Her daughter also loved riding horses and writing poetry.

"She was outgoing," Loring says. "She wasn't scared of anything, And for how small she is, she was..."

A Road Trip In 'America For Beginners'

21 hours ago

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This week in the Russia investigations: Two big questions about the second-most famous Russian in the world and Rod Rosenstein fires a warning shot.

Finnish fallout

No Hollywood screenwriter could get away with turning in a treatment for this week. The studio bosses would roll their eyes and ask for the story to be more plausible.

It's a haunting image. At dusk, hundreds of Rohingya refugees at a camp in Bangladesh are huddled around a projector, looking at something just outside the frame — a film about health and sanitation.

That photo, taken on an iPhone by documentary photographer Jashim Salam of Bangladesh, is the grand prize-winning photo of the 2018 iPhone Photography Awards.

Today, white yachts bob on the turquoise surface of Balaklava Bay, a quiet inlet hidden from the open waters of the Black Sea. But 30 years ago, the bay was a restricted military zone, filled with submersible giants of the Soviet navy.

What Your State Is Doing To Beef Up Civics Education

Jul 21, 2018

Fake news. Record-low voting turnout. Frequent and false claims from elected officials. Vitriol in many corners of political debate.

These are symptoms we hear of all the time that our democracy is not so healthy.

And those factors might be why many states are turning to the traditional — and obvious — place where people learn how government is supposed to work: schools. More than half of the states in their last legislative sessions — 27 to be exact — have considered bills or other proposals to expand the teaching of civics.

If you've been to a beach this summer, anywhere from Texas to the Carolinas, you've likely seen it. Masses of brown seaweed, sometimes a few clumps, often big mounds, line the shore. It's sargassum, a floating weed that's clogging bays and piling up on beaches in the Gulf and Caribbean.

On Miami Beach recently, Mike Berrier was enjoying the sun and the water, despite the sargassum weed.

More than 100 former student athletes have reported "firsthand accounts of sexual misconduct" committed by Ohio State University physician Richard Strauss nearly two decades ago, the school announced on Friday.

Officials said the allegations date from 1979 to 1997. They include students who, at the time, were varsity players in 14 sports and patients of Student Health Services.

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City of Jonesboro

Jonesboro City Council to Review Diversity Resolution in August

The Nominating and Rules Committee has forwarded a resolution to the full city council that would encourage diversity on the city’s volunteer boards and commissions. Jonesboro has several boards and commissions that citizens can serve. Some of the boards and commissions include the Board of Zoning Adjustment, Land Use Advisory Committee, Metropolitan Area Planning Commission, Civil Service Commission, Auditorium Commission, Municipal Airport Commission, and the Advertising and Promotion...

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Arkansas Business and Politics

A multi-media news organization focusing on Arkansas news and information specific to the economy and policy. Listen Mondays & Fridays at 6:51 am; Wednesdays at 5:20 pm.

As Heard on Morning Edition

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. For over 3 decades, this show has prepared listeners for the day ahead with news, analysis and commentary.

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Whale Of A Plane: Airbus BelugaXL Makes First Flight

It's built for oversize cargo, but it also sports a smile: The Airbus BelugaXL took off on its first flight on Thursday, creating a unique sight as the jet with the bulbous upper half rolled down the runway. The BelugaXL's paint job "features beluga whale-inspired eyes and an enthusiastic grin," the aircraft company says. That whale flew over southern France, soaring over the coast and mountainside. The jet is the first of a handful that Airbus will use to shuttle large aircraft components...

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